CORONAVIRUS/COVID-19

Who Infected Whom?

Many meat processing plants are closing due to the rapid spread of coronavirus through those factories.

It’s been commonly reported that the workers at these animal processing plants infected each other. But how do we know that the animal meat itself didn’t contain the coronavirus, and through handling of the meat infected the workers?

How many live animals have been tested for coronavirus and how many tests have been done on the raw meat after slaughter?

A lot of blood splattering occurs during the slaughter process, directly exposing the workers to blood thus cells. The raw meat hangs in the air, increasing the risk of the air-borne potential of the coronavirus via flesh as well as blood if these animals are infected.

The flesh is moist and the blood is exposed on the flesh. In humans, exposure to the actual blood is not required to contract the virus, because the living, breathing organism can pass the virus to others via coughing or sneezing or touching their drippings from mucous membranes of the eyes, nose and/or mouth.

Even if wearing gloves, coats and masks, air-borne particles can reach the workers, especially in ventilated areas creating air currents.

Who cleans the blood from the floors and the utensils and the machinery and the assembly lines?

It’s hard to imagine that those white coats don’t get soiled with blood. Even the coverings of surgeons and operating room personnel get soiled. Ever see a butcher’s white coat?

Nobody talks about transmission of the virus via blood – even in humans. Why not? Perhaps the connection would steer humans away from eating the flesh and the blood. Better to focus on coughing and sneezing? After all, dead animals can’t cough or sneeze.

I wonder if a dead human with coronavirus were covered in blood, if those handling the body would regard themselves as safe?

During the proliferation of the HIV virus years ago, first responders to an accident suddenly began wearing gloves for protection. In fact, all healthcare workers did – even though it was considered a sexually transmitted disease.

It’s time to start testing animals before they reach the processing plants for the coronavirus – en masse – as well as those already slaughtered and hanging in coolers waiting to be processed further.