Study links ‘tobacco tactics’ with marketing unhealthy products to kids | Food Dive

BRIEF

Study links ‘tobacco tactics’ with marketing unhealthy products to kids

AUTHOR Cathy Siegner

PUBLISHED March 20, 2019

Dive Brief:

A recent study from researchers at the University of California San Francisco found R.J. Reynolds and Philip Morris applied their knowledge about the tobacco industry, from marketing to product development, to increase sales of sugary drinks after acquiring food and beverage companies. According to Food Ingredients First, the study used “secret documents” from the two tobacco giants and marketing campaigns from their beverage brands, including Hawaiian Punch, Tang, Kool-Aid and Capri Sun, and Tang. The tobacco companies later sold these brands to Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Mondelez International​ and Kraft Heinz, respectively.

The researchers say the findings show that many food and beverage companies today still use similar tactics despite signing the Children’s Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative. CFBAI participants agree to comply with nutritional standards in food advertising directed at children younger than 12, including reducing sugar, sodium and saturated fat…

FINISH READING: Study links ‘tobacco tactics’ with marketing unhealthy products to kids | Food Dive






 

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Good Catch hopes consumers will bite as it launches plant-based tuna at national retailers | Food Dive

 

BRIEF

Good Catch hopes consumers will bite as it launches plant-based tuna at national retailers

AUTHOR

Cathy Siegner

PUBLISHED

Feb. 21, 2019

Dive Brief:

Plant-based tuna from Good Catch Foods will be available this week at Whole Foods Market and Thrive Market outlets nationwide, the company announced. The two retailers will be the first to carry the shelf-stable product.

The New York-based startup said in its statement it is aiming both to appeal to consumers and protect ocean fisheries with its new product. Nearly 90% of the world’s marine fish stocks are either overexploited or depleted, Good Catch said, adding that scientists predict global fisheries may totally collapse by 2048.

Plant-based tuna avoids the high mercury levels, PCBs, dioxins and other contaminants found in ocean-based fish. It also avoids the diseases and other problems presented by factory fish farming and aquaculture, the company said.

Dive Insight:

Tuna was undoubtedly a deliberate choice for this new plant-based product since it’s one of the most popular — and overfished — species in the world, according to Forbes.

Good Catch’s mission is to disrupt the seafood category with products consumers want without any of the negatives. Company officials claim it is the first plant-based brand that truly rivals real fish. The ready-to-eat products deliver the flavor and flaky texture of chunk albacore tuna, the company says, and are available in three varieties in 3.3-ounce pouches — Naked in Water, Mediterranean and Oil & Herbs.

To make its faux tuna, Good Catch uses a six-plant protein blend made from pea protein isolate, soy protein isolate, chickpea flour, lentil protein, faba protein and navy bean flour. Each serving contains 14 grams of protein, which is about 30% less than real tuna. The new products also contain algal oil for flavor and to provide a plant-based source of omega-3 fatty acids.

Consumers may be more willing to try this plant-based product when they find out it doesn’t smell like the real tuna they’re used to. Good Catch examined why people like tuna and found it was the protein, taste and texture — but not how it smells, Chad Sarno, the company’s co-founder, executive chef and vice-president of culinary, told Forbes…

FINISH READING: Good Catch hopes consumers will bite as it launches plant-based tuna at national retailers | Food Dive






 

Gingko Bioworks uses $90M funding round to launch ingredients firm Motif | Food Dive

 

BRIEF

Gingko Bioworks uses $90M funding round to launch ingredients firm Motif

AUTHOR

Cathy Siegner

PUBLISHED

Feb. 27, 2019

Dive Brief:

Startup Gingko Bioworks announced the launch of its Motif Ingredients company with a $90 million funding round. Investors included Breakthrough Energy Ventures — which has Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Michael Bloomberg and Richard Branson on its board — Louis Dreyfus Company, Fonterra and Viking Global Investors.

The biotech firm said the new company will use Ginkgo’s biological engineering platform to recreate proteins from dairy, egg and meat to use in plant-based alternatives. Motif CEO Jonathan McIntyre said in a release that consumers wrongly believe plant-based foods will be more expensive and won’t taste or function like animal-based foods. “Motif will be key to propelling the next food revolution with affordable, sustainable and accessible ingredients that meet the standards of chefs, food developers, and visionary brands,” McIntyre said. How to overcome go-to-market challenges companies with shareable, real-time insights that are fast and easy to access can mitigate losses and improve strategic planning, ultimately increasing their speed to market.

Find out how.

Dive Insight:

Ginkgo Bioworks is launching Motif Ingredients to try and locate the next big thing in protein alternatives. Consumer demand for meat substitutes and plant-based beverages jumped 17% last year, the company noted, so this could be the optimal time for a company like this. According to CNBC, Ginkgo CEO Jason Kelly started strategizing on a new ingredients company in 2017 because of the success of Impossible Foods and its plant-based Impossible Burger that “bleeds.” Bill Gates has also invested in Impossible Foods, according to Crunchbase, and he seems to have an ongoing interest in funding and developing more sustainable protein products. No doubt it will help to have such heavy hitters backing the new company.

There are plenty of plant-based competitors out there besides Impossible Burger. Beyond Foods is staking its future on the plant-based Beyond Burger, as well as plant-based sausages and chicken. Gates has financially backed Beyond Meat as well, which has posted net losses in previous years and filed for an estimated $100 million IPO last fall. Other plant-based burgers already in the market, or coming soon, include the Lightlife Burger from Lightlife Foods and Nestlé’s Garden Gourmet Incredible Burger…

FINISH READING: Gingko Bioworks uses $90M funding round to launch ingredients firm Motif | Food Dive






 

JUST Egg cracks the substitute category wide open | Food Dive

JUST Egg cracks the substitute category wide open. The mung bean-based vegan breakfast item is taking grocery shelves by storm, reinvigorating the category and aiming at new markets with big manufacturing and distribution partnerships.

AUTHOR

Megan Poinski@meganpoinski

PUBLISHED

Feb. 21, 2019

If 100 chickens were laying JUST Egg, it would take them more than 12 years to produce the same amount of mung bean-based egg replacement that has sold in the United States, Hong Kong and Singapore in four months, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture statistics.

JUST Co-founder and CEO Josh Tetrick told Food Dive the company recently crossed the benchmark of selling the equivalent of 3 million eggs. The equivalent of the last 1 million was sold in the previous 30 days, he said at the beginning of February. The strong consumer desire and the transformative possibility of a vegan egg substitute have driven rapid growth of the product, Tetrick said.

“It’s pretty fun to see because, the truth is, you never know (how popular an item will be) until it’s out there,” Tetrick said. “You can do all sorts of consumer studies and tests and invite people to your headquarters and try. But, actually, until it’s out there in the wild, you don’t actually really know.

“After appearing on restaurant menus for a few months, the San Francisco-based food tech company’s JUST Egg first appeared on grocery shelves in September. The product has already been picked up by Aramark, which serves the egg substitute in patty form at some hospital, college and corporate cafeterias. Late last month, it rolled out nationwide at grocery stores owned by Albertsons.

But all of the growth isn’t just in the United States. Earlier this month, German poultry provider PHW Group announced it was entering into a partnership to sell and distribute JUST Egg to retailers and foodservice providers across Europe. Last summer, JUST entered into a partnership with Italian egg company Eurovo to manufacture and distribute the product in Europe.

“It makes me really optimistic about the food system generally, not just about what we’re doing, that one of the biggest poultry companies in the world and the biggest egg processor in the world are the building blocks of what we’re trying to do in Europe. I think that’s a pretty extraordinary thing.” Josh Tetrick Co-founder and CEO, JUST…

FINISH READING: JUST Egg cracks the substitute category wide open | Food Dive

 






 

Why DuPont is expanding its plant-based protein nugget line | Food Dive

 

BRIEF

Why DuPont is expanding its plant-based protein nugget line

AUTHOR

Cathy Siegner

PUBLISHED

March 14, 2019

Dive Brief:

DuPont Nutrition & Health has introduced six different plant protein nuggets to its Supro and Trupro product range containing more protein or less sodium. According to Food Business News, the new ingredients are available in different formats and textures and can be used in snacks, cereals, nutrition bars and toppings.

The company’s Supro Nuggets contain 80% soy protein and less than 120 milligrams of sodium per 100 grams. The Trupro Nuggets contain 70% pea protein and are non-GMO, the company said.

“These new nuggets broaden our range of plant protein options that drive high protein content and unique textures,” said Jean Heggie, strategic marketing lead, said in a release. “Our plant-based nuggets help manufacturers differentiate their brands with improved nutritional profiles and exceptional eating experiences.

“SPONSORED BY IRCEIRCE @ RetailXIRCE @ RetailX is taking place in Chicago from June 25-28, 2019 and will cover the latest trends in the retail world.

Dive Insight:

Plant-based ingredients are just about guaranteed to inspire interest from manufacturers and consumers as one of the hottest trends in the food and beverage industry. Wrapping all these attributes into one package is likely to attract notice for DuPont from a range of product manufacturers and companies looking to check some or all of these boxes — crunch, convenience, snacking, protein, low sodium and plant-based.

Plant-based and protein-enriched are two elements that can work well together in products because combining both types of ingredients can help satiate, act as a meal replacement and supply important nutrients, particularly for the growing number of people looking beyond meat and dairy sources for their protein…

FINISH READING: Why DuPont is expanding its plant-based protein nugget line | Food Dive






 

Why Kellogg’s MorningStar Farms is going 100% plant based | Food Dive

 

Q&A

Why Kellogg’s MorningStar Farms is going 100% plant based

AUTHOR

Lillianna Byington@lil_byington

PUBLISHED

March 13, 2019

As the plant-based trend spreads, Kellogg is using its MorningStar Farms business to move forward as a leader in the space.

At Natural Products Expo West last week, the legacy veggie protein brand launched a new vegan “Cheezeburger” and announced its commitment for its portfolio to be 100% vegan by 2021.

The new promise will allow Kellogg to expand the accessibility of its plant-based products and reduce its use of more than 300 million egg whites a year. MorningStar Farms’ full product line includes Falafel, Meat Lovers, Veggie Lovers and Tex-Mex burgers as well as Chik’n nuggets and patties. But they aren’t stopping there.

Melissa Cash, head of global marketing, strategy and innovation for plant-based protein and natural brands at Kellogg, talked to Food Dive at Expo West about how the brand plans to launch more plant-based products in the coming years, why they chose this new vegan burger and how more consumers are shifting their tastes to plant-based products.

This interview has been edited for clarity and brevity…

FINISH READING: Why Kellogg’s MorningStar Farms is going 100% plant based | Food Dive






 

Fast-growing chickens presents texture issue for the industry | Food Dive

 

BRIEF

Fast-growing chickens presents texture issue for the industry

AUTHOR

Jessi Devenyns

PUBLISHED

March 20, 2019

Dive Brief:

After years of breeding chickens to grow rapidly and produce the maximum amount of breast muscle possible, poultry producers are running into problems. They include woody breasts, similar to chewing leather, and squishy fillets known as “spaghetti meat,” according to The Wall Street Journal.

Researchers at the University of Arkansas estimated it will take an extra $200 million in industry expenses for companies to identify and divert breast fillets that are too tough, squishy or striped with bands of white tissue to sell in restaurants or grocery stores.

Some commercial poultry consumers such as Wendy’s and Whole Foods have switched to purchasing smaller, slower-growing birds in an effort to circumvent undesired textures, The Wall Street Journal noted. Chicken industry officials are confident they will be able to minimize the meat texture problems caused by genetic selection, but it will take several years to do so.

How to overcome go-to-market challenges companies with shareable, real-time insights that are fast and easy to access can mitigate losses and improve strategic planning, ultimately increasing their speed to market.

Find out how.

Dive Insight:

Texture is an emerging challenge within the poultry industry. After decades of working to produce more chickens faster, breeders can now grow a 6.3-pound birds in 47 days, according to the National Chicken Council — roughly twice as fast as 50 years ago. Although this rate of production can be beneficial for the bottom line — chicken breasts can be sold at a 13% premium compared to overall wholesale chicken meat prices, The Wall Street Journal noted — it can actually be detrimental to sales if consumers don’t like the taste. Even if scientists are unsure as to what is causing these strange textures, consumers are noticing the change and that can hurt sales. Chicken producers have seen a drop in demand recently and these textures don’t help…

FINISH READING: Fast-growing chickens presents texture issue for the industry | Food Dive



TRANSLATES TO: Poultry Industry Scared






 

The Man Deciding Facebook’s Fate – The New York Times

By Cecilia Kang

March 8, 2019

WASHINGTON — The Federal Trade Commission has no shortage of critics who say it cannot protect Americans from the prying eyes of Big Tech. Instead of forceful action against the likes of Facebook and Google, they say, the F.T.C. leans on a rules that make it hard to impose penalties bigger than rounding errors for the companies.

Those critics have an unusual champion: Joseph J. Simons, the man running the agency.

“We have this over 100-year-old statute that is our main authority,” Mr. Simons said in his first sit-down interview since becoming chairman 10 months ago. “And clearly legislators who approved that were not thinking about data security and privacy issues.

”In the deregulatory era of the Trump administration, Mr. Simons, 60, a Republican lawyer who has jumped between the public and private sectors for more than 30 years, is a rare voice for strengthening the government’s hand.

Mr. Simons has urged Congress to expand the F.T.C.’s privacy-enforcement powers and allow it to impose fines more easily, write new rules and hire more experts. He also says the agency should police how all companies and nonprofits — not just technology companies — collect and handle people’s digital data…

FINISH READING: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/08/technology/ftc-facebook-joseph-simons.html?partner=IFTTT






 

ANIMAL-FREE BEVERAGES

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ANIMAL-FREE SNACKS

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Be sure to read labels, since companies change their formulas often.

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ANIMAL-FREE MEATS AND DAIRY

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Be sure to read labels, since companies often change their formulas.

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ANIMAL-FREE FRESH and FROZEN GOODS

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Be sure to read labels, since companies change their formulas often.

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ANIMAL-FREE DRY GOODS

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Be sure to read labels, since companies change their formulas often.

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ANIMAL-FREE CAN, JAR ETC. GOODS

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Be sure to read labels, since companies change their formulas often.

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John Robbins of Diet For A New America

A powerful wave of awakening is sweeping across the earth today. Everywhere people are realizing that we have been unnecessarily fighting a war against the environment, against animals, and against ourselves. In every part of the world people are now wanting to bring their lives into deeper alignment with more life affirmative values and a respect for Creation and its creatures.

But to many the prospect of becoming vegetarian seems like a deprivation. You may grant that it’s healthier, kinder and lighter on our resource base to avoid animal products, but, you may say, you like the finer things in life, and do not want to survive on brown rice and tofu. You want to be healthy, yes, but perhaps wonder if it’s worth it if it requires a diet of alfalfa sprouts, wheat germ and mashed yeast.

In COOKING WITHOUT ANIMALS Sharon Davies-Tight has come to the rescue, and banished such fears. For her book is a connoisseur’s delight, impeccably designed for the person who enjoys cooking, and considers creating edible delights to be one of lifes worthy achievements. The recipes are clearly thought out, and presented with crystal clear clarity. The detail and variety are impressive, and the result is a book that treats the preparing of meals as a high art.

COOKING WITHOUT ANIMALS may well be the most comprehensive guide to purely vegetarian gourmet cooking yet written.

Sharon obviously loves cooking, and does not cut corners when the price would be a compromise in the final product. Nothing is half-baked, vague or left to your imagination. In fact, the directions could not be easier to understand, and can lead even a rank amateur to the culinary heights of expertise. If you want to expand your repertoire of non-animal fare, she’s your lady. Be advised though, that if you want to go very low-fat, and stay with what are termed as “health foods”, such as whole grain baked goods, this book may not be for you. It’s for people to whom the creation of fine cuisine without the products of animal suffering is the goal, not the elimination of all packaged or refined foods.

With every passing day more and more people are seeing that how we treat other beings says something important about us as people. The treatment of animals in contemporary factory farms is so appallingly cruel that you do not have to be in any way sentimental to find it unacceptable. The vegetarian journey is made easier by books such as COOKING WITHOUT ANIMALS, which yields to none in delights for the palate.

Choosing to no longer swallow the products of pain is an act, not only of compassion for the animals, but of self-respect. As Sharon says, you have every reason to be proud of yourself for taking such a step. She’s proud of you; and so am I.

~ John Robbins, author, DIET FOR A NEW AMERICA


DONATE NOW TO CHEF DAVIES-TIGHT, the animal-free chef






 

WHY VEGAN?






 

What Does Animal-Free Mean?

ANIMAL-FREE VEGAN COMPANIES ARE STILL IN THEIR BIRTHING STAGE

What this means is that for many companies to get up and running they need to use the factories that other companies use to manufacture their goods that do contain animal products. They basically rent out the facilities, thus the common labeling of possible and/or traces of allergens – among them animal products – on their animal-free vegan goods.

There are very few animal-free vegan companies that build their own factories. Most simply can’t afford the cost. So until such time that the demand for animal-free vegan goods increases to the point where they can stand on their own, I accept that there may be traces of animal products in the animal-free vegan products that I purchase. They can clean the equipment between uses, but it’s nearly impossible to wipe out all traces of what was previously manufactured on the same equipment.

My criterion for animal-free is that the recipe | formula itself contain no animal products.

If my French fries that I order at a restaurant are fried in the same oil that chicken is fried, I will eat the fries. The demand isn’t popular enough for restaurants to have essentially two kitchens – one for animal-free, one for animals. For me to refuse to eat out, doesn’t make any sense, since evolution takes time, and my presence at a restaurant ordering an animal-free dish matters. It shows the chefs, the workers, the patrons that I want to eat there, but I don’t want any animals in my food.

There’s not a magic wand we vegans are going to wave, whereby one day we wake up and all manufacturing companies and restaurants suddenly decide to convert their manufacturing plants and eating establishments to animal-free vegan – and then instantly follow through on it.

Veganism is spreading more rapidly than in the past, still, the way restaurants are currently responding to that trend is by focusing more on vegetarian (including eggs and dairy) than on all vegetable/plant-based.

There’s a Chinese restaurant I go to where the chef makes tofu – to date about eight different ways. Delicious! with many different sauces and combinations of vegetables and fruit. He of course has a full animal-based menu. For me not to eat there because he cooks animals would be counterproductive to the movement. Chefs evolve just like everybody else, and often meet resistance from those who want to hold onto their traditional ways of cooking. If there aren’t enough vegan customers to keep them in business (which there aren’t), all the restaurants will go out of business. And then where will we be?

Then there’s the grocery stores. If I won’t shop at a grocery store that sells meat, I won’t eat, because there aren’t enough of them that are totally vegan.

That will all change, but in the meanwhile I’m going to be part of that change, by supporting animal-free vegan companies that may have traces of animal products in their animal-free vegan goods, because they can’t yet afford to build their own factories, and I will eat at animal-based restaurants that care enough about my business to make me a delicious animal-free meal.

Although we’ve come a long way, we are still in the birthing stage of making our dreams of a cruelty-free planet a reality everywhere. Giving up because we’re not yet there is not an option I give myself.

The animals need us at every stage and juncture of the evolutionary process to free them.

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The Contradiction Issue

Upon choosing a healthier more compassionate diet, you will be challenged by those who have not yet taken that step, to defend your decision to not eat animals. They will argue that your animal-free diet contradicts your other animal using behaviors, thus making the issue of killing animals not worthy of consideration. They will point to your leather shoes, your wool sweater, your prescription drugs in a capsule, and the operation you may have had at some point in your life, which was the result of animal experimentation. They will look closely at what you eat, laying in waiting, ready to pounce, should you inadvertently or advertently consume any semblance of an animal product.

They will present you with a myriad of arguments: We slaughter animals because we raise them for slaughter; we’re at the top of the food chain; they don’t contribute to society; God gave us permission; they taste good; we’ve always done it; everyone else does it; men developed large arm muscles with which to hunt; we developed canine teeth with which to tear flesh; animals kill each other; it’s a matter of survival; we’re superior; plants scream when pulled from the ground; they’re dumb; they can’t feel pain or fright; they would otherwise suffer from overpopulation and starvation, all the while keeping you on the defensive, in order that you not offend – them and their right to consume animals.

What gives us the right to raise anyone for slaughter? An animal in captivity has the same capacity to feel pain, fright, and loneliness as an animal who is free. The only difference is that one gets a death sentence before s/he is born, and subsequently suffers accordingly. I suppose that being at the top of the food chain is not a bad place to be, unless we’re ever invaded by aliens who have a penchant for humans. My guess is that we’d get rid of that “next down balance of nature”  theory  real quick.

One cannot measure contribution, however, if one could, animals would be categorized as contributing a great deal to any society. However, animals do not exist on this planet for the benefit of humans; they exist for their own benefit. And I sure would like to meet the person God told that we could use the animals as we saw fit. Since when did the word dominion come to mean use, abuse and destroy? Humans wrote the bible. Where God’s inspiration left off and their self-serving motives began is a little unclear.

If we happen to be stronger than some animals, that in itself does not give us the right to use and abuse them. Nothing gives us that right. As far as tasting good, so might we. But we don’t do it, because we know that it is wrong. So whether we like it or not, rightness and wrongness is at issue here. If a woman has always battered her children, does that make it right? Of course not. If we continued to do everything we’ve always done just because we’ve always done it we’d never progress. The effort to civilize must continue.

…and who says a couple of billion of people can’t be wrong? Of course they can. The majority is not always right. If we did everything our neighbors did, we would be slaves to their desires, and our destinies would be in their hands.

Why men developed stronger musculature than women, nobody really knows; they can only conjecture. However, if men’s muscle development were contingent upon the amount of food they brought home from their hunts, they never would have developed, since 80% of all food gathered was close to home in the form of nuts and berries, by women who carried large baskets as well as children for hours at a time while they walked and worked. So, if hard labor was the precipitating factor in developing high levels of testosterone in men, thus giving them strong muscles with which to kill animals, then women would have developed high levels of this hormone as well, which they didn’t. Be that as it may, men’s arm muscles were used for a lot more than pulling strings on bows and arrows. And about these so-called canine teeth: these teeth are needed to open nuts, tear stalks, peel fruit and eat vegetables. I do not tear flesh, but consider these teeth important to the enjoyment of my food.

All other animals do not kill each other to eat. In fact, most animals are vegetarians. But regardless of whether an animal or human kills another, that does not give us the right to do it. Why do what somebody else does when you know the pain and suffering those actions cause?  Our judgments regarding what’s necessary for survival are biased by our own desires, habits, and previous as well as on-going conditioning by our parents, our peers, the medical profession, scientists for hire, and advertising campaigns designed by companies that want you to buy their products. If eating animals was such a cure all for what ails us, there wouldn’t be so many hospitals and nursing homes filled with sick people. Eating animals hinders our health by injecting too much saturated fat, protein and salt into our systems.

Superiority is always bad for the ones marked inferior, whether it be an ethnic group, a race, a religious group, an age group, a sex, a socioeconomic group, the homeless, the handicapped, the unemployed, anyone with an IQ below 120, anyone who challenges the status quo. The perception of being superior gives no one authority over another’s life. We all witnessed, in some way, the systematic slaughter of millions of humans initiated solely by the erroneous assumption of superiority of one ethnic group over another.  This is what we as humans are doing to the animals–with impunity.

…but to go so far as to claim that plants scream when pulled from the ground and use this to justify the continuation of slaughter, leaves those of us with compassionate minds no room for compassionate choices – a clever tactic from the crafty minds of those who profit from our consumption of their products. All movement makes sound. When magnified thousands of times, even something as harmless as plucking a hair from your own head, will sound pretty horrifying.

I’m sure you don’t really believe that those who can’t take intelligence tests designed for humans (or even humans who score low on such tests) are not intelligent. Animals are aware, can solve problems, use tools, communicate with each other and humans, etc. I have three dogs who have not been trained through fear to submit to my will, and their intelligence levels continue to enlighten me. The way they manipulate their environment is astounding. But even if they (or anyone else) were not as intelligent as another, that does not give us the right to hurt them. And if you think that animals can’t feel pain, then think again. When an animal is injured and squeals, why do you think they are squealing? Because they feel good? Of course not. They squeal because they hurt – just as you would. Animals do not always let you know that they are hurting – just as humans don’t. But people will assuage their consciences by telling themselves that the animals cannot feel the abuses committed against them. So why don’t they run from their aggressors? Because animals are trusting creatures – as are humans. However, the fault doesn’t lie in trusting – the fault lies in the self-serving minds of those who abuse power – for whatever reason or to whatever end.

What takes the cake are the hunters who stuff the heads of their prey and hang them on their office walls, all in the name of compassion. This concept of killing those we perceive as suffering is a frightening one. Why not go into the forests with food and medical supplies instead of guns? What will they do next, go into China, India, Africa, and solve their overpopulation and starvation problems with bullets? If I dare speak for the animals, I think they’d rather take their chances with nature. I know I would. But starvation of humans or animals need not exist anywhere on this planet. There is plenty of food to go around.  Once again, the problem lies in the crafty minds of those who abuse power – for their own selfish end. But to get back to the hunters – they hunt for the thrill of killing – nothing more. Anything else they derive from the sport can be accomplished on a picnic in the woods.

My final response to the accusation that my animal-free diet contradicts my other animal using behaviors, is simply that I didn’t create this pervasive multi-billion dollar animal abusing industry. The mass abuse (and killing is abuse) of animals by humans was not created overnight and it won’t be eliminated all at once. But I recognize the situation as unacceptable, and I’m doing something about it. I believe that change is possible, and through changing ourselves, we change the world. We have to start somewhere, so I’m starting with my diet (the meat went first, then the eggs, then dairy – and none of these went all at once). The leather shoes will go next, then the wool. All the while, new animal-free products will replace the old. And, new more effective research will be developed eliminating the use of animals in scientific experiments. I see the future as bright, and I’m doing my share, one step at a time, to make this a healthier more civilized planet for all of God’s creatures. However, as long as killing animals remains socially acceptable, you will be expected to defend your choice not to participate–and in my case, it is my pleasure to do that!

Cooking and eating animal-free takes us a step further along the path of civilization and your first step, no matter how small or faltering, contributes to the direction of this process. There is no contradiction here!

God bless you,

Sharon Lee Davies-Tight, the animal-free chef






Pest Prevention

MY PANTRY JARS

If you live in an apartment as I do, then you can’t have any open containers, boxes or bags of food. Everything I open goes into a jar with a tight-fitting lid.

If I open a box of cereal, I don’t roll down the clear waxed bag inside the box, thinking pests won’t find it. They’ll find it. After opening, I empty the box into a jar. If I use half a box of pasta, I don’t surmise that pests won’t like it anyway. I don’t take a chance. In the jar it goes.

Containers with tight-fitting lids are available at every dollar store. They’re cheap. Buy a cheap bookcase to put them on. Find room. You’ll be glad you did.

Every night before I retire, I empty the trash and wipe down the inside of the trash container, even though it had a bag in it. There is never any food out unless I’m cooking or eating, and when I’m done it promptly gets put away.

There is no such thing as leaving the dishes till morning, or saying just one night won’t hurt. Yes it will. Wipe down your counters, sinks and stove with soapy water at the end of the evening, being sure all crumbs are gone. Sweep your kitchen floor, so everything is fresh when you rise in the morning.

When you move into a new apartment, go under your sinks – kitchen and bathroom. Plug up the holes around the pipes into the wall with fine grade steel wool. Then seal the openings with duck tape. Landlords won’t mind. In fact they’ll like it. Then every year or so, redo them. Tapes get old and buildings settle.

If everybody did their part of controlling pests in their own living spaces, then apartment buildings wouldn’t be so over-run with them.


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I Want An Animal-Free Mall

I WANT AN ANIMAL-FREE MALL

That’s right. A mall. Animal-free. A big one. With lots of glitter and big lights. With every kind of shop. Grocery, bakery, deli, shoe store, pet supply shop, clothes, hair salon using only cruelty-free products, and on and on, restaurants too. Good ones. I have a vision. And it’s a nice one. No fur, no leather, no skins, and those who enter must wear all animal-free attire. This place has rules. No cruelty here. Yes, that’s right. That’s what I want. A happy place too. No vegetarian snobbery. There’s no place for arrogance in the animal-free world of Sharon Lee. No suffering looks on the faces of people who feel they’re being deprived.

Now that I mention it, I see that on a lot of vegetarian faces. Faces that still have Big Mac lines on them, so it’s not the deprivation causing the look. But it’s there. Maybe it’s the prejudice and discrimination directed at such folks that makes them so unhappy, especially when they’re doing something so right.

It’s okay to have fun while you do what’s right. It’s okay to laugh. God, my God, wants happiness. Every burst of laughter coming from one of It’s animal’s mouths delight’s It to no end. That’s one more frown It doesn’t have to turn upside down. So, laugh. Have fun. Enjoy your life. Just don’t kill the animals. That’s all. Not a lot to ask. And don’t participate by eating the catches of other people. If you do, try harder next time, till you get it right. I’m tired and sick and fed up and depressed (that doesn’t mean I’m not happy) over walking down the aisles of death in every supermarket in the world.

I’m offended and pained at being forced to view and smell the tortured, dismembered bodies of my animal friends. When is it all going to end? Entrepreneurs is what we need. Animal-free entrepreneurs. People with dreams. Big ones. Investors with money that flows in a cruelty-free world. Not just the small, never grow any bigger, shops sprouting up here and there. Though that’s a start and we have to start somewhere, so we’ll support them too. But bigger stores, and big chains of every conceivable market transformed into animal-free.

Fast food. Animal-Free Chefs. Veggie Burgers. Veggie Deli’s. Veggie Pizza Parlors. No animals nor animal products. Veggie cheese. Plant meats that taste like baloney, ham and turkey, but without the suffering. We don’t need featherless chickens; we need to free the chicken. International animal-free cuisines. I’m tired of having my animal-free products supplied by purveyors of torture. Why should I have to eat my vegetarian meal in a slaughterhouse? Why should I have to buy my clothes at a slaughterhouse? Aren’t you sick of it too? Being given your little vegetarian or vegan corner of somebody else’s house of cruelty? Just to satisfy a small segment of the market? Small segment?

Well, it wouldn’t be so small if more animal-free entrepreneurs with big ideas and big investors gave people what they really wanted: a cruelty-free world, which means a cruelty-free shopping mall. We could do it if we’d stop thinking so small. Big. Think big. Demand big. Stop trying to get your animal-free products in slaughterhouses. How absurd. Build your own stores. Start small if you want, but grow, by golly, grow. Give the people what they want before they ask for it. You know what people want. You’ve been silent too long. Too complacent. Okay, ‘I guess I’ll take whatever vegetarian crumbs they throw my way’ type of silence.

Plan the future. Make the future. See the future through God’s eyes. See big. See beautiful. I want an animal-free shopping mall. And then another, and another till we put the slaughterhouse malls out of business. Till we close the doors on the business of cruelty. I want an animal-free mall. And, I know you want it too. One for all people–and all other animals too. No zoo here, but a place where our animals can come shopping with us. Day care, mall care, for our furry family members while we shop. A mall with style, flair, with sparkle and bright lights. I can see it. I know you can too. Cause I’m looking through God’s eyes now and so are you.