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Impossible Foods Net News

The latest Impossible ‘meat’ has pork farmers questioning the name

TA-FC ClipBoard: Nobody is making the claim that it’s made from a pig. Maybe we should take issue with the pig farmers calling their product pork, so the children who were born and bred on family farms wouldn’t think they were eating their friends. The farmers should have called their animal meat what it was, pig meat or hog meat. If the world came to think pig was synonymous with pork, then people have a right to make an imitation product out of plants.

It’s imitation pork. Impossible is synonymous with imitation. Yes, most farmers would think it was impossible to do. But guess what? Somebody did it.

Does anybody think it strange that the pig/hog/pork farmers are now poking their noses into the plant meat industry’s business and trying to make policy for them? The animal meat industries do not control the plant meat industries. 


Business
Alexandria Burris, Indianapolis Star
USA TODAY
 
A few months ago John Hardin stopped by a Burger King to try the Impossible Whopper for the first time. The plant-based burger patty on the Whopper sandwich had been lab engineered to mimic the taste and appearance of beef, and its soaring popularity last year created a national shortage.

“I wanted to taste it for myself,” the Danville, Indiana, resident said. “I wanted to see how close it was.”

Hardin had another reason for wanting to try the Impossible Burger: He wanted to understand what he saw as his future competition.

“This is going to have an impact on what I do, and I realized it was only one data point,” said the 75-year-old patriarch of a family of Hoosier pork producers. “This is the very, very early days in how this will evolve.”

About a year after Redwood, California-based Impossible Foods rolled out the Impossible Burger 2.0 in January 2019, the company introduced its newest plant-based product, Impossible Pork, at the international Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

Like its predecessor, Impossible Pork is engineered to replicate meat, and has some Indiana farmers bracing for what could possibly be a disruption to their business. The National Pork Producers Council, meanwhile, is objecting to the company’s use of “pork” — a word that means flesh of a pig used for food — to describe a product derived from plants.

The food fight has begun.

Is pork still pork if it’s not from a pig?

Your tenderloin or pork chop may well have come from an Indiana farm.

With roughly 2,800 farms raising hogs, Indiana is the fifth largest exporter of pork in the U.S. About 66% of Hoosier production takes place on farms that have more than 5,000 heads of hogs, said Josh Trenary, executive director of the Indiana Pork Producers Association.

Those hogs can end up at processing plants in Kentucky, Michigan and elsewhere, where they are made into chops, ham and bacon later stacked on grocery store shelves.

Impossible Foods aims to disrupt that process. The company’s mission minces no words: eliminate the use of animals as a food source by 2035. In the place of animals, the company wants to see meat derived from alternative sources such as plants via processes that have less of an environmental impact.

Rachel Konrad, Impossible Foods spokeswoman, said the company is a long way from reaching that goal. To do that, the startup would have to double its growth, revenue and “everything else” every year for at least the next 15 years — an ambitious feat, Konrad admits.

For now, Impossible Foods just wants to get its plant-based, gluten-free meat in front of omnivores.

The company says its scientists have created what it views as a more sustainable, affordable way to make “meat” to feed a growing population.

Similar to the Impossible Burger, the company’s plant-based pork contains soy leghemoglobin, a heme protein produced when scientists genetically engineer and ferment yeast. Heme is found in living plants and animals, and Impossible Foods says its version of heme is similar to what carnivores consume in meat. The molecule gives cooked meat its flavors and aromas, the company says.

Pork producers and the national council that represents them say they aren’t afraid of competition, but they object to the usage of a specific term associated with animals being used to describe plant-based substitutes.

There’s no pork in Impossible Pork, they say.

“They’re taking our name,” said Dan Kovich, director of science and technology for the National Pork Producers Council. “You can’t make pork from plants unless you feed it to a pig.”

Kovich and Hardin, the Indiana pork farmer, said consumers will decide whether Impossible Pork is a menu option they want to eat, but they are concerned about consumer confusion.

“I don’t want them to think they’re eating pork,” said Hardin, whose farm operation has 500 mother pigs. “They’re eating something that’s meant to look like it.”

He also questions whether its nutritional value is the same or less than lean meats. According to Impossible Foods, Impossible Pork has 16 grams of protein, 3 milligrams of iron, 13 grams of total fat and 7 grams of saturated fat in a 4 ounce serving.

Similarly, every 4 ounce Impossible Burger has 370 milligrams of sodium, 14 grams of fat, 19 grams of protein and 9 grams of carbs. Chipotle Mexican Grill and Whole Foods executives have criticized plant-based products from Impossible Foods and rival Beyond Meat as being too processed.

Pork producers aren’t the only industry to challenge how companies label the packaging of imitations products. Cattle and dairy farmers have sought to codify, via federal regulations, what can be called “beef” and “milk.”

Lawmakers across the country have moved to enact such labeling laws in their states. Missouri was the first to do so. The state’s law requires that only products from slaughtered animals can be labeled as meat.

In Indiana, State Rep. Terry Goodin, D-Indianapolis, introduced House Bill 1350 at the General Assembly this session, but the bill is no longer being considered.

A Republican-backed bill moving through the Maryland General Assembly also died in a committee this year. The American Civil Liberties Union, Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit the Good Food Institute and the Animal Legal Defense Fund challenged the constitutionality of an Arkansas law to keep words like “burger” off the packaging on vegan and vegetarian food products. A federal court blocked that law in December.

During the same month, the Plant Based Foods Association, a trade organization, released a set of voluntary labeling standards for plant-based meat alternatives. Under the standards, packaging could have references to animal meat as well as qualifiers that indicate the product is not derived from an animal.

Trenary said the Indiana Pork has not taken a position publicly. He said the issue is better addressed by the federal government since the product is federally regulated.

“The fact that states are weighing in certainly demonstrates that there’s concern out there overall,” he said. “Indiana Pork is certainly supportive of the efforts nationally to make sure the naming conventions that are being used are clear.”

Konrad of Impossible Foods downplays the potential for consumer confusion.

“We bend over backwards to emphasize that our product is made from plants,” she said, adding that Impossible Burger labels state the product is plant-based. “In fact, the reason that our product is enjoying skyrocketing growth is precisely because there are no animals in it.”

A growing market

Vegans and vegetarians are not the consumers Impossible Foods aims to attract.

“They’re already doing the right thing for the environment because they’re not eating,— you know, quite literally — high on the hog,” Konrad said. “They are eating in a way that is sustainable and scalable for the planet. So we don’t want them to eat our product at all. Save our product for the true carnivores.”

The target market, she said, is the same market the pork industry seeks.

“Our goal is to take an increasing percentage of their customers and get the meat out of their diet and make it Impossible,” she said.

There is a market for both plant-based and pig-based pork, Konrad said, adding that 95% of Impossible Foods consumers regularly eat animals.

Impossible Foods is expected to make Impossible Pork, which can be charbroiled, sauteed, baked and grilled, available to consumers later this year. The company also unveiled Impossible Sausage at CES, a version of the pork with a bit of spice. That product has debuted exclusively at Burger King.

Besides Impossible Foods, companies such as Tyson, Perdue Farms, Beyond Meat and Daily Harvest also are vying to fill consumers growing appetite for meat alternatives.

Grocery sales of plant-based foods that directly replace animal products have grown to $5 billion in 2019, a 29% increase over the prior two years, said The Good Foods Institute, citing SPINS retail data released March 3. Plant-based milk accounted for about $2 billion of those sales. Plant-based meat generated about $939 million in sales.

Brian Martin is a fifth generation farmer in western Indiana. He raises hogs for consumption and medical uses like in hernia bandages.

The rising popularity of meat alternatives hasn’t affected his day-to-day operations, but a growing public interest in animal welfare and the environment has led to changes in how some pork producers raise their livestock, he said.

“A lot of our culture today is becoming more and more interested in where food comes from and its carbon footprint on our planet, and I think that’s an awesome thing,” Martin said.

Concerns about the environment and climate change are driving some people to reduce the amount of animal meat in their diets, according to Euromonitor International, a business intelligence and market analysis firm based in the United Kingdom. Still, the consumption of meat is expected to outpace its substitutes through 2022 in the United States.

“There’s no question that domestically in the U.S. we will continue to see an increase in the consumption of an all-plant diet,” Martin said. “But I believe that in a world that continues to need more food, there will continue to be lots of people that like to eat bacon.”

From suppliers to producers, pork supports more than 14,000 jobs in Indiana and $633.1 million in personal income based on 2016 production levels, according to Indiana Pork Producers Association.

Hogs are the state’s third most valuable agricultural commodity, accounting for 11.4% of 2018 farm receipts, according to the latest data from the United State Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service. The state’s pork exports generated $364 million that year.

The livelihoods of livestock farmers are intertwined with soybean and corn farmers who provide feed for pigs and cattle. So Hardin says what happens on one end of the market could affect the other.

He views the rise of Impossible Foods and similar companies as another disruption for the pork industry which he survived others before.

“We’ve had these disruptions all across our economy and for at least the last 30-40 years, and we’ll see how this one goes,” he said, adding that some consumes may want real meat.

“If they’re not concerned about, you know, how foods are manipulated and manufactured then the other products might hold hosts sway,” he said.

Follow IndyStar reporter Alexandria Burris on Twitter: @allyburris.

This article originally appeared on Indianapolis Star: Impossible Pork: Why Indiana hog farmers aren’t pleased

Source: The latest Impossible ‘meat’ has pork farmers questioning the name






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BURGER KING Impossible Foods Net News

You Don’t Need to Fear the Estrogen Content In Impossible Burgers

CNAP ClipBoard: Tiffany Stevens the author of this article states, “So if you’re worried an occasionally meatless meal will turn you into a woman, don’t be. Instead, prove your masculinity by taming your fear of new foods.”

  • If men are worried about being turned into a woman, what do the women have to fear, being turned into a man?
  • An “occasional” meatless meal will give you a sex change? Who said anything about occasional? Meat at every meal is the deal, has been for decades. If not meat, then some animal product – milk and/or eggs are in just about everything. It’s almost like once they started using the fluids and eggs of the animals, they put them in everything. Can you imagine the obsessive compulsions directed at finding uses for animal products? Looking back it all seems pathological.
  • When you have to read a label to see if there are any animal products in the product you want to buy, that tells you that nearly everything contains animals of some sort. Otherwise you wouldn’t have to look.
  • Most of the men I see in Cleveland are fat and they all have man boobs and none of them are vegetarian or vegan. I mean, why do men have breasts in the first place? Or hadn’t anybody noticed?
  • The rapid growth hormones they get from eating animals designed to grow fast and fat is what’s responsible for their breasts being kicked into milk producing gear!!
  • Hey, if this keeps going and men keep overloading their systems with rapid growth hormones, the men will develop the capacity to become milk producing machines and be able to feed the planet! You know, how they expect the cows to give them milk? Well, now the human male with be the number one supplier. Nobody will want human female milk. MALE MILK will be in HIGH DEMAND. WE’VE GOT MALE BOOBS. Who WANTS cows when we’ve got HUMANS?
  • But wait, it’s happening to women too. Ever see so many women with super huge boobs walking around all over the planet – almost like they’re being HAND-BRED for factory farming of milk? They’re almost half their body size. And their bodies are huge too. Where did they come from? Cows, Chickens, Pigs, Lambs…that’s where. It’s because of the animals they eat, not because of plant estrogen.
  • The Republicans in the USA had nothing to do with people’s soy fears that began a long time ago. This is nothing new and the discovery was made by Asians who eat a lot of it and written up by the British. The story wasn’t about boobs. It was about decreased libido – in both men and women after they consumed tofu. It “cools the cockles”, they say – but only temporarily.
  • Cockles refers to the testicles in men – maybe women will be growing cockles too – not impossible through the evolutionary process that lots of people claim doesn’t exist. Cockles are in the mollusk family and the shape resembles testicles.
  • I never thought it a good idea to have sex after a meal. We’d have sex first, then go out to wine and dine. Much more fun and relaxing that way, rather than hardly enjoying the meal with sex on our minds – this way we had the best of both worlds.

Tiffany Stevens

MyRecipes January 15, 2020

Between Beyond Meat, Impossible Foods, and other emerging plant-based meat companies, it’s never been a better time to be a vegetarian or vegan. Nor has it ever been easier to cut back on meat consumption in general, for the sake of your health and for the sake of the planet. Diners who want to occasionally sub an Angus patty for a plant-based one can now find those options in a number of restaurants, including Burger King, which added the Impossible Whopper to its menu in the fall of 2019.

New food technology can sometimes spark unnecessary fears among eaters, however, especially when a new food product is seen as unnatural or weird. Take, for example, the recent rumors warning consumers to beware the estrogen content in Impossible Whoppers and other Impossible Food products, lest the delicious, meat-free burgers cause men eating them to grow breasts.

Fears about soy products feminizing men have existed for quite a while. The Impossible Burger fear mongering, however, is a bit more recent. It stems from a 2019 story published by Tri-State Livestock News, a trade publication covering livestock agriculture.

Written by James Stangle, who specializes in veterinary medicine, the story claims that four Impossible Whoppers a day contain “enough estrogen to grow boobs on a male.” That story was then picked up by conversative pundits such as Michael Savage, according to The Washington Post.

It seems silly to point out that few people, if any, are buying and consuming four Impossible Whoppers daily. But even if a man did decide to eat Impossible Whoppers for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and a snack between, he needn’t worry about developing feminine secondary sex characteristics.

For starters, the compound contained in Impossible Burgers isn’t human estrogen at all—it’s phytoestrogen, a plant isoflavone that acts similarly to human estrogen, but doesn’t have nearly the same strength, according to Insider.

Phytoestrogen, which is often found in soy, can promote the effects of naturally occurring estrogen, which exists in all humans. But it can also suppress it, since it has both estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects. How phytoestrogen affects you depends on what your existing estrogen levels are as well as other individual biological factors.

Regardless of whether it promotes or decreases the effects of naturally occurring estrogen, however, it still doesn’t have the strength to grow breasts in men.

Although Stangle didn’t include this citation in his piece, it seems his claims may have stemmed from a single case in which a Texas man in 2008 developed “breasts and breast soreness” from drinking three quarts of soy milk a day, according to Snopes. Those effects went away after he stopped ingesting that extreme amount of soy milk regularly. This isolated case from 12 years ago might be shocking, but it’s not enough evidence to sound the alarm on soy products in general.

The validity of the feminization fears surrounding soy products is also belied by the number of countries that rely on soy products; a plethora of Asian countries have been using soy beans for centuries without men in those societies suffering adverse or unexpected biological effects.

It’s worth pointing out that the feminization fears behind the Impossible Whopper estrogen rumors are inherently tied to sexism, homophobia and transphobia in some circles. Meat eating is also connected, in some men’s mind, to masculinity; the idea of eating a veggie burger amounts to an assault on their very identity. There’s nothing to fear from eating a plant-based burger, however; a bite of a charbroiled soy product won’t take away anyone’s man-card.

So if you’re worried an occasionally meatless meal will turn you into a woman, don’t be. Instead, prove your masculinity by taming your fear of new foods.

Source: You Don’t Need to Fear the Estrogen Content In Impossible Burgers






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Beyond Meat Impossible Foods Net News

Impossible Foods CEO slams ‘the most destructive technology on Earth by far’

Impossible Foods CEO slams ‘the most destructive technology on Earth by far’

Daniel Howley

Technology Editor

January 8, 2020, 1:27 PM EST

Impossible Foods unveils plant-based pork and sausage

Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown is bringing the heat to CES 2020 in Las Vegas, America’s biggest consumer tech trade show. The head of the plant-based meat company not only debuted two new products, a ground pork and pork sausage alternative, but slammed the meat industry in an interview with Yahoo Finance, calling it “the most destructive technology on Earth by far.”

The company’s ultimate goal is to completely replace animals as a form of food by 2035.

Impossible Foods already offers a beef alternative in its Impossible Burger, which uses plants and includes a soy-based heme protein, which gives the burger the faux blood that makes it “bleed.”

The new sausage offering goes on sale in January at 139 Burger King locations in various test markets across the U.S. There’s no word on availability for the ground pork offering just yet.

Impossible’s latest move comes as the fake meat wars continue to heat up. The company’s biggest competitor, Beyond Meat (BYND), went public in 2019 and saw its stock skyrocket from its IPO price of $25 all the way to $234 in July, before settling back down to $83.89 on Tuesday.

On Tuesday, Impossible told Reuters it’s no longer seeking a deal to supply McDonald’s (MCD) with its Impossible burger due to supply constraints. Beyond Meat’s shares jumped on the news.

Holding the meat industry’s feet to the fire

With beef and pork alternatives already on the table, Brown says that chicken and turkey alternatives, as well as other plant-based meat options, are on the way.

Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown holds up an Impossible Burger 2.0, the new and improved version of the company’s plant-based vegan burger that tastes like real beef, at a press event during CES 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada on January 7, 2019. – (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP)

“Again the thing that you just have to remember to anticipate everything Impossible is going to do is that our intention is to completely replace animals as a food production technology, the most destructive technology on Earth by far,” Brown said. “And that means that any product that we’re currently producing using animals, Impossible Foods is already working on, and will commercialize a plant-based, a better, more delicious, more affordable, vastly more sustainable version of that product.”

Brown’s claims of the impact of the meat industry on the environment aren’t unfounded. There have been several studies linking meat to everything from climate change to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Which is why, he says, Impossible Foods is so important.

Beyond Meat offers a similar reason for its products’ existence, naming the meat industry’s impact on the environment as an example of why plant-based alternatives are necessary.

“It’s a very important problem to solve,” Brown said. “Pork production is actually a big public health issue, because there are actually more antibiotics fed to pork, to pigs, than to all humans. It’s a major source of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.”

While there’s been a lot of discussion about the meat industry’s impact on climate change through methane produced by farm animals, Brown says Impossible Foods is focusing on more than just how the climate itself is affected.

“Of course, it’s not just about climate, it’s about global biodiversity, it’s about water resources, water pollution, and so forth,” Brown said. The nutritional impact of plant-based meat alternatives has also been a major sticking point for the companies. And while they have a lower amount of saturated fat than their animal-based counterparts, plant-based burgers like Impossible’s do have more sodium than beef.

But Impossible’s pork products won’t help anyone if they don’t taste good. Fortunately, for Brown, after I tried a soft-shell corn taco with the company’s ground pork offering, I can report that the taste of Impossible Foods’ faux pork is as close to the real thing as you can get.

It’s not dry, and even browns similar to pork. If I didn’t know it was plant-based, I wouldn’t have been able to tell the difference. In our own Yahoo Finance taste test last fall, Impossible’s burger outshined Beyond’s by a slim margin.

As for the pork, we’ll just have to wait and see how the rest of the world feels…

Source: Impossible Foods CEO slams ‘the most destructive technology on Earth by far’






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BURGER KING Daiya Dairy Free Follow Your Heart Non-Dairy Impossible Foods Net News TEST PRODUCT REVIEWS Tofutti

Lawsuit claims Burger King’s Impossible Whoppers are contaminated by meat

CNAP RESPONSE: Burger King’s claim that The Impossible Whopper is 100% Whopper and 0% beef is not true.

It can’t be both. A 100% beef whopper is not 100% Impossible Whopper.

A Whopper is defined as containing 100% animal product, namely beef.

In addition, nobody calls a Whopper, a Whopper Sandwich. I’ve never heard it, except when people are writing about it.

To America and the world a Whopper is a big burger on a big bun. Nobody says they’re going to have a burger sandwich – in real time. Burger King is a little late to the table in changing what they call their Whopper into a sandwich. It’s like a hot dog. Nobody calls a hot dog in a bun, a hot dog sandwich, unless it’s made on rectangular bread.

The lawyers and Madison Avenue are trying to trick people into believing they’re eating something they’re not, by the confusing, ambiguous language they use.

There’s no wonder the confusion regarding this product. There should have been none. When I say I develop animal-free recipes with the animal meat-eater in mind, it doesn’t mean I add animal meat. Burger King made a mistake by dividing people.

Why lie? Why deceive the public in what you’re selling and what they’re buying?

According to Burger King:

The WHOPPER = “Our beef patties are made with 100% beef with no fillers, no preservatives, no additives, no nonsense. We also make our flagship product, the WHOPPER® Sandwich, with 1/4 lb* of savory flame-grilled beef.”

IMPOSSIBLE WHOPPER = “100% Whopper, 0% beef.

Our Impossible™ WHOPPER® Sandwich features a savory flame-grilled patty made from plants topped with juicy tomatoes, fresh lettuce, creamy mayonnaise, ketchup, crunchy pickles, and sliced white onions on a soft sesame seed bun. 100% WHOPPER®, 0% Beef.”

The registered mark is the same on an Impossible Whopper and a Whopper description put out by Burger King advertisers. So, if an Impossible Whopper is made with a 100% WH0PPER® which is made with 100% beef, there is a conflict. It can’t be both.

The 100% WHOPPER = 100% BEEF, not 100% plant.

So, don’t call the plant version of the Whopper a Whopper that is 100% WHOPPER®. It isn’t.

  • Clear that up before you get sued for that too.

I’m not a friend of BURGER KING. But I am a friend of ANIMAL-FREE MEATS DAIRY & FOODS.

Get an animal-free mayonnaise and cheese. Something white for the cheese, so employees don’t mix up the orange dairy cheese with the plant white cheese.

It’s already available. daiya brand and Follow Your Heart brand make the best cheeses for burger purposes. They soften quickly against the heat of the burger – daiya quicker than Follow Your Heart.

daiya is round and FYH is square. I like the round version for shape on a burger; it still wraps down over the burger nicely.

Tofutti brand Inc. is a contender, but the cellophane wraps are cumbersome and it’s not as healthy – good though; it tastes good against any burger. It also melts quicker against the heat of the food than the others – sometimes too much.

The animal-free mayonnaise that holds up the best is JUST MAYO.

Vegenaise brand, although good, has a consistency problem as you approach the bottom of the jar. JUST MAYO doesn’t; it feels thicker, which is better for restaurants.

IMPOSSIBLE WHOPPER

THE IMPOSSIBLE WHOPPER ISN’T A WHOPPER

THE IMPOSSIBLE WHOPPER UPDATE



Lawsuit claims Burger King’s Impossible Whoppers are contaminated by meat

By Jonathan Stempel and Richa Naidu,

Reuters 18 November 2019

Plant-based alternatives health-craze is here to stay

By Jonathan Stempel and Richa Naidu

(Reuters) – Burger King was sued on Monday by a vegan customer who accused the fast-food chain of contaminating its meatless “Impossible” Whoppers by cooking them on the same grills as its traditional meat burgers.

In a proposed class action, Phillip Williams said he bought an Impossible Whopper, a plant-based alternative to Burger King’s regular Whopper, at an Atlanta drive-through, and would not have paid a premium price had he known the cooking would leave it “coated in meat by-products.

“The lawsuit filed in Miami federal court seeks damages for all U.S. purchasers of the Impossible Whopper, and an injunction requiring Burger King to “plainly disclose” that Impossible Whoppers and regular burgers are cooked on the same grills.

Burger King, a unit of Toronto-based Restaurant Brands International Inc, declined to comment, saying it does not discuss pending litigation.

Its website describes the Impossible Burger as “100% Whopper, 0% Beef,” and adds that “for guests looking for a meat-free option, a non-broiler method of preparation is available upon request.

“Williams’ lawyer did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the disclaimer or the available cooking options.Impossible Foods Inc, which helped create the Impossible Whopper, has said it designed the product for meat eaters who want to consume less animal protein, not for vegans or vegetarians.

“For people who are strictly vegan, there is a microwave prep procedure that they’re welcome to ask for in any store,” Dana Worth, Impossible Foods’ head of sales, said in a recent interview.

Burger King began selling the Impossible Whopper in August.

Restaurant Brands also owns the Canadian coffee and restaurant chain Tim Hortons, and is overseen by Brazilian private equity firm 3G Capital.

The case is Williams v Burger King Corp, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida, No. 19-24755.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York and Richa Naidu in Chicago; Editing by Tom Brown)

Source: Lawsuit claims Burger King’s Impossible Whoppers are contaminated by meat





 

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Beyond Meat Gardein Meatless Meats Impossible Foods Net News

Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have a new foe in the plant-based burger wars: the Ultimate Burger

Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have a new foe in the plant-based burger wars: the Ultimate Burger

Brian Sozzi

It’s ultimately not meat. But the Conagra Brands-owned Gardein brand hopes its new plant-based Ultimate Burger wins over Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods loyalists in 2020.

Gardein, acquired in Conagra’s 2018 acquisition of Pinnacle Foods, will release the next iteration of the Ultimate Burger in January. The burger is a mixture of soy and pea protein, assorted spices and canola oil. It will join several other plant-based Gardein products currently on the market, such as fishless fish and meatless meatballs (using the same proteins). The “Ultimate” label will also be used on a line of spicy sausage and hot dogs.

Wrapped in sleek brown packaging, the Ultimate Burger scores big on overall value: a six-pack of burgers will go for $11.99. A two-pack of Beyond Meat burgers could set you back about $5.99.

The notorious five pound Impossible Foods “brick” can go for upwards of $250.

A Conagra spokesperson says the Ultimate Burger will quickly reach supermarkets and restaurants given its extensive network of ingredient suppliers.

Ultimate burgerIt’s not surprising to see Conagra go all-in on plant-based foods. Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have created a surging market, fueled by great-tasting plant-based products and new deals at restaurant chains such as Burger King and McDonald’s.

The meat alternative category has hauled in $957 million in sales for the 52-weeks ended November 2, up 10% year-over-year, according to Nielsen. Within this category, the meatless burger business has seen $272 million in sales, up 11.4% from a year ago.

Brian Sozzi is an editor-at-large and co-anchor of The First Trade at Yahoo Finance. Follow him on Twitter @BrianSozzi

Source: Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have a new foe in the plant-based burger wars: the Ultimate Burger






 

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BURGER KING Impossible Foods Investing

The Impossible Whopper Isn’t A Whopper

About the ingredients: Shortly after Burger King released the Impossible Burger in all it’s stores in the USA I contacted them on their main website to ask if the bun contained any animal products. They did not respond.

I’m sure many people who don’t want animals in their buns or their mayonnaise, or any other food, had the same question. Given the anticipation of that question, Burger King should have given that information on their website, rather than keep everybody in the dark about it. Their failure to do that, knowing veganism was at the heart of why they were introducing the Impossible Burger on their whopper sandwich in the first place was a strategy error.

Burger King purposely did not satisfy everybody with the Impossible Whopper. They purposely left the vegan out, by not declaring the bun or the mayo animal-free. They made the burger to satisfy everybody, but not the mayo and maybe not the bun. I still don’t know for sure if the bun contains animal products.

When the animal-free chef engineers a recipe, some vegans may think it’s not vegan enough, for a variety of reasons, but her recipes never contain any animal products to the best of her knowledge.

Was Burger King angry at vegans and the hoops they make companies jump through to become certified vegan? Did they want to stick it to them? Or were they trying to placate their animal-eater base by disregarding the vegan altogether? A little payback that some market analysts may think the animal-eaters want? Probably all of the above.

Since the customer turnout for the Impossible Burger was already massive through other venues, Burger King really didn’t have to be concerned about their animal-eating customers turning up their noses at the product. It was already a proven commodity.

My take at this point: The Impossible Whopper is not an Impossible Whopper, unless the entire whopper fits the impossible designation. Currently, Burger King is in violation of it’s own claim of impossibility, by calling it’s sandwich the Impossible Whopper.

Our WHOPPER® Sandwich is a ¼ lb* of savory flame-grilled beef topped with juicy tomatoes, fresh lettuce, creamy mayonnaise, ketchup, crunchy pickles, and sliced white onions on a soft sesame seed bun.

The new Burger King sandwich should be called “The Whopper With The Impossible Burger”.

As it turns out, the Impossbible part of the Impossible Whopper was only the burger, not the entire sandwich that makes a whopper a whopper.

An Impossible Whopper would include an Impossible mayonnaise, since traditionally mayonnaise was made with eggs. Plus an Impossible bun, since most bread companies include milk product in their buns, even though it’s not needed to make a bun a bun. 

From a business point of view Burger King underestimated their animal-eating base, by disrespecting a group on their behalf, that made the Impossible burger possible. And here they are enjoying the results of all their sacrifices. Somehow it didn’t feel right that they couldn’t eat it too, only because Burger King failed to provide them with an animal-free bun and animal-free mayo along with the animal-free burger.

Making the only sandwich that Burger King sells without an animal burger totally animal-free, (bun, condiments and burger) is so easy. It’s only one sandwich, yet the executives at Burger King, and/or Restaurant Brand International, and/or 3G Capital – the Brazilian Investment firm were compelled to go only halfway with it – at the risk of losing the people responsible for the development of the plant burger as well as those animal-eaters who now feel sorry for vegans that Burger King left them out. 

That so many others have served the Impossible Burger so everybody, including vegans, could eat it makes one wonder about the motives behind Burger King intentionally not doing it.


Although Facebook Vegans most often claim never to eat any plant styled proteins resembling meat styled from an animal, and if they occasionally do, they wouldn’t eat at an establishment that didn’t have the equivalent of two Jewish kitchens, one for cooking flesh and one for cooking fluids, or in this case, one for animal meat and one for plant meat, or forget the two kitchens if the shops only serve vegan that is certified vegan, like Pareve and Kosher is certified Pareve and Kosher, then that’s okay.

Although justifiable, regarding not wanting animal meat to be cooked in the same place that plant meat is cooked, because of the cross-contamination, it’s unrealistic at this stage of conversion from animal to plant to make that a serious demand. Note that separating flesh and fluid of the animal when cooked or prepped and plated in Jewish kitchens ends there, since Jews don’t have two sets of teeth, tongues, esophagi, stomachs, and intestines. Although they eat the flesh and fluids separately, they meet each other once in the mouth, simply because you can’t wash the mouth thoroughly enough between introduction of flesh and fluid to leave no trace of either. 

Facebook Vegans are not the majority of vegans nor even the majority of those who don’t consume animals. In fact, if Jews still make up only 1/10th of 1% of the total human population of the species (which is questionable), then vegan Jews make up a much smaller than 1/10th of 1% of the world vegan population (not counting all the other animals that don’t eat animals).

Some can argue that most vegans are Jews. I see something there. But most Jews aren’t vegan, and therein lies the proof of the rub.

That all being said, most Facebook Vegans who focus on unreasonable or unfeasible demands, while beating up other vegans for not being vegan enough, in other words, one cannot eat anything even grown as a plant out of respect for the worm being crushed by the shovel during planting time, are trolls hired by the animal-exploiting and animal-consuming industries meant to disrupt the proliferation of the animal replacement industries.

Most real vegans don’t care what you make the plant look or taste like as long as there’s no animal suffering or animal in it. On a late Saturday night, when a group of friends turn to getting something to eat after a night of partying, the vegan in the group is delighted to discover that the restaurant chosen by the group not only has a great animal-free burger but has a great bun and condiments to match. Yes. They eat it. And love it. I know, because I do the same.

Make the plant whopper to look and taste like the animal whopper. That’s the Impossible part. 

Make all the customers happy. If the slaughter industries et al are the ones feeding you intel on vegans based on what vegans say on Facebook, then what they’re really telling you is what their own trolls are paid to do on Facebook – set up fake vegan accounts and divide and conquer the animal rights movement and the vegan community.

Lots of animal rights people eat animals, just so you know that. There’s overlap as in any large group or demographic. The majority are the ones who will definitely eat that Impossible Whopper, but not if the bun or the mayo contains animal products. Don’t force them to eat the burger without the bun. Why do that? Your market analysts are feeding you false information regarding the majority of real-life vegans.


Who owns Burger King is my next question regarding judgments being made at the executive level. Let’s take a look.

Restaurant Brands International (rbi) owns Burger King, Tim Hortons and Popeyes. Home office in Toronto, Canada.

Chief Executive Officer: Jose Cil

Who owns rbi?

3G Capital is a Brazilian Investment firm. Offices in Rio De Janeiro and New York city.

3G Capital (which held a 71% majority stake in Burger King) holds a 51% majority stake in Restaurant Brands International. … In January 2019, Jose Cil was named the CEO of Restaurant Brands International…

Brazil appears to be the major influencer here. 

Brazil’s richest man: Jorge Paulo Lemann. 3G’s Capital head and board member.

3G Capital, founded in 2004 as Lemann and four partners were consolidating the Latin American and European beer industry, became a mainstay in the U.S. when its portfolio company InBev acquired Budweiser for $52 billion in 2008. Soon after, 3G’s dealmakers dramatically improved margins at the brewer. Apr 30, 2018.

Carlos Brito, a protege of Lemann’s introduced zero-based budgeting to 3G Capital. 

Zero-based budgeting (ZBB) is a method of budgeting in which all expenses must be justified for each new period [not just new expenses]. The process of zero-based budgeting starts from a “zero base,” and every function within an organization is analyzed for its needs and costs.

THE LEAN AND MEAN APPROACH OF 3G CAPITAL

Although the above referenced article is from 2017 it still holds true for the industry and deserves a quick read.

Berkshire Hathaway is also a major influencial investment party.


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BURGER KING Impossible Foods TEST PRODUCT REVIEWS TEST PRODUCTS

IMPOSSIBLE WHOPPER

This is the burger everybody’s been talking about and quite frankly, compared to the other Impossible Burgers I’ve had this hardly resembled it.

There are two ways you can order this burger at Burger King cooked: either flame broiled, or microwaved for those who don’t want their burger cooked on the same surface an animal patty was cooked. I chose flame broiled, since I’m not into that two kitchen thing that observant Jews do: one for flesh and one for milk, cheese and eggs, since it’s against their religious beliefs to have them touch each other.

I ordered it flame broiled, but it didn’t taste nor texture like what I’ve had in the past, which could only mean they microwaved it.

It was also thinner, much thinner and drier, so I’m surmising the people at Impossible Foods took the animal patty and made a close replica of it. Evidently not all Impossible burgers are equal.

The girl doing the cooking in the back didn’t know what vegan meant when the guy up front asked her if the mayo was vegan. The up front guy had to look on a small packet of mayonnaise and he couldn’t see it, so I looked and immediately saw contains egg. He said I was so rapid that I gave him a headache.

The guy assured me there was no animal in the bun, but who knows.

There was only one other person in the store eating and it looked like it was closed from the outside. It also looked like they were trying to save on electricity. Dark inside, dark outside. It was a freaky experience. I was happy to get back on the bus into familiar territory.

It tasted like a whopper. The burgers I recall from fast food decades ago were pretty dry. It was all the goop on them that made them taste good.






 

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BURGER KING Impossible Foods Net News

Behold the Beefless ‘Impossible Whopper’

By Nathaniel Popper

Photographs and Video by Matt Edge

OAKLAND, Calif. — Would you like that Whopper with or without beef?

This week, Burger King is introducing a version of its iconic Whopper sandwich filled with a vegetarian patty from the start-up Impossible Foods.

The Impossible Whopper, as it will be known, is the biggest validation — and expansion opportunity — for a young industry that is looking to mimic and replace meat with plant-based alternatives.

Impossible Foods and its competitors in Silicon Valley have already had some mainstream success. The vegetarian burger made by Beyond Meat has been available at over a thousand Carl’s Jr. restaurants since January and the company is now moving toward an initial public offering.

White Castle has sold a slider version of the Impossible burger in its 380 or so stores since late last year.

But a national rollout at Burger King’s 7,200 locations would dwarf those previous announcements and more than double the total number of locations where Impossible’s burgers are available…






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Beyond Meat BURGER KING Impossible Foods TEST PRODUCT REVIEWS

The Impossible Burger – update

This is one popular burger. Everybody wants it. Even burger joints that sell only animal meat want it. Fortunately for me several locations all at once, near enough so I could get to them, started putting it on their menus.

We ordered it at Earth Bistro in Cleveland, a restaurant that makes everything they serve on the menu vegan-friendly. Can be made vegan.

Probably, but I don’t know for sure, most burger eaters like their burgers medium rare. This was my experience with The Impossible Burger.

Yes, it had a blood taste, but it textured too soft. It seemed barely cooked, barely even warm. In fact the bun was warmer than the burger.

Steve felt like I did. It was okay as far as burgers that bleed go, but he likes his burgers well done. So do I.

When speaking to the owner, he said of course they were still learning to work with it, and that if cooked beyond a certain temperature, it stiffens considerably according to the instructions.

I’m not sure if they actually wasted one by experimenting with it, but you really need to do that.

Firming this burger up, allowing for a longer cook time so when it gets to the customer it is still hot is important.

It wasn’t cohesive enough, and of course it plopped out the sides of the sandwich when I bit into it, more like a chicken salad only made with a burger.

The Impossible Burger is too fragile. Not wanting to lose a burger, cooks are so afraid to go beyond the temperature suggested, that they undercook it. That’s my take on it.

Tighten it up and don’t be afraid to add a little salt.

I won’t order another one until it’s improved. I certainly do appreciate the effort that went into the development of this burger. I look forward to the new and improved IMPOSSIBLE BURGER – maybe a separate one that’s well done. Two varieties: Medium rare – well done.


UPDATE on 7 March 2018

I posted my short review of THE IMPOSSIBLE BURGER onto THE IMPOSSIBLE BURGER Facebook Page. This was there response:

Impossible Foods Thank you for reaching out, Sharon! We’re sorry to hear that your experience didn’t meet your expectations. We’re always working to improve, and we really appreciate your feedback. 👍

If you decide to give the Impossible Burger another go, we’d recommend requesting that it be prepared more well-done. Everyone likes their burgers cooked differently, but we enjoy a medium well preparation of our product.”

My Comment > So, it can be cooked longer than the chef cooked it. Cooks and chefs all over should know this. Like the person from Impossible Foods said, they enjoy a medium-well, which probably is perfect. I will try it again and make my requests and report back. Thank you to IMPOSSIBLE FOODS for clearing that up for me – and anybody else who experienced the same problem.

 






 

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Impossible Foods

The All-Vegan Impossible Burger Will Be Everywhere Soon 

From One Green Planet:

The Impossible Burger has just opened a new production facility. Welcome to the future of food.

Since the Impossible Burger’s debut on the meat-centric menu of restaurateur David Chang’s Momofuku Nishi, Impossible Foods’ premier product has continued to gain momentum. Every day, hungry customers would line up outside Momofuku Nishi waiting to get a taste of  the vegan “burger that bleeds.” Thanks to an innovative combination of wheat and potato protein, coconut oil, and heme, an iron-rich compound, the Impossible Burger is closer to the real thing than any other burger. No matter if they were vegan, vegetarian, or meat-eater — everyone wanted to experience how true to the taste and texture of a beef patty the Impossible Burger truly was.

Shortly after, the Impossible Burger was added to the menu of several high-end restaurants, each with their own interpretation of how to serve it. Most recently, Bareburger, an organic restaurant chain with 44 locations in five countries, added the Impossible Burger at one of their NYC locations with plans to expand to other U.S. locations, offering a customizable experience and bringing the meat-free burger that tastes like the real thing even closer to mainstream consumers. Bareburger CEO and co-founder Euripides Pelekanos told Fortune that unlike other vegan burgers, the Impossible Burger is “geared toward meat eaters,” continuing, “It’s not going to live as [a] veggie burger on the menu. It’s going to live side-by-side with the beef burger.” At a time when more people than ever are cutting back on meat consumption, the plant-based Impossible Burger is giving consumers something that has been missing up until now: a meatless option that is practically indistinguishable from the real thing.

However, the success of the Impossible Burger at high-end restaurants was only the beginning. Rather than settle for being the sole vegan burger option, Impossible Foods’ CEO Patrick Brown is looking to make the burger that bleeds the new norm at every burger chain. And now, a future where even more Americans can pick up the Impossible Burger from a local restaurant is closer than most of us thought possible. Impossible Foods just cut the ribbon on a large-scale production facility located in Oakland, California.

As reported by The Good Food Institute, the facility will allow Impossible Foods to increase their production capacity from enough burgers to supply only eight restaurants to enough for 1,000 restaurants. That’s at least one million pounds of meatless meat per month (enough to make four million burgers), which is 250 percent more than their current capacity, according to a report by Yahoo! Finance. The entire game is about to change. But what makes this burger so different from the prepackaged veggie burgers we’re already familiar with?…

Finish reading: The All-Vegan Impossible Burger Will Be Everywhere Soon | One Green Planet