The Plant-Based Pitfall

The current trend in labeling a manufactured food, that CONTAINS NO ANIMAL PRODUCTS (CNAP), is to label it PLANT-BASED rather than VEGAN, or ANIMAL-FREE. Some worry about the negativity associated with animal rights groups, so veer from the usage of the word vegan on their product even though it might be vegan.

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Weedkiller found in granola and crackers, internal FDA emails show 

US government scientists have detected a weedkiller linked to cancer in an array of commonly consumed foods, emails obtained through a freedom of information request show.

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Contains No Animal Products (CNAP)

CONTAINS ANIMAL PRODUCTS (CAP)

CONTAINS NO ANIMAL PRODUCTS (CNAP)


ANIMALS ARE ALLERGENS.

If you’re allergic to fur, then you’re allergic to skin. If you’re allergic to skin, then you’re allergic to flesh. If you’re allergic to flesh, then you’re allergic to blood.

All humans are sensitive to animal products. You have an animal sensitivity. Every human does.

People in the past blamed how badly they felt on anything but the animal. Strange isn’t it? – how we never made that connection, never even inquired, wondered. It was always something else in our mind that took the blame.

Till now.

It’s not the macaroni salad; it’s the steak. It’s not the cake; it’s the eggs in the cake. It’s not the coffee; it’s the cream in the coffee. Get it now?

Okay, then let’s get some labels printed.

Under the allergen category on all labels on all products insert either CAP or CNAP. Contains Animal Products or Contains No Animal Products






 

Force-Feeding Labels

The reason why food companies and manufacturers won’t tell you what’s under the natural flavoring label is because it’s bad news. They want to trick you into eating animals, even if it’s a rat hair, which by the way, appears in most products along with mites and a lot of other microscopic stuff that even they can’t see.

So absent the hair, what other part of any animal do you add to your product?

Bones, teeth, genitals, eyeballs? Tell us. Hormones, blood? Yeah we know about the hair. That’s not the issue here. We do want to know what you’re force-feeding us by not telling us what’s under the natural flavoring label – even if you think it’s too little for us to care.

Yeah. But it’s not too little for you to hide, is it?

You, the manufacturer and food company, are forcing us to consume something we may or may not want. That’s a decision only we make – we the people make, individually deciding what each one of us wants to eat or not eat.

If it’s for sale in a market, then we have that right to demand and know exactly what we’re paying for. Show me what law, who wrote it and who voted to pass it.

If you’re worried that some other company will be able to replicate your recipe by exposing the ingredients under the natural flavoring label, then simply put under the natural flavoring label: CONTAINS NO ANIMAL PRODUCTS or CONTAINS ANIMAL PRODUCTS.

Actually, no one has the right to hide any ingredient in any recipe/formula made for public consumption.

Even if everybody’s researchers can replicate everybody else’s products, at least there will be transparency, and maybe what will sell one company’s product over another company’s exactly replicated product is customer service, availability and price.






 

Ingredient LABELING

You think you’re too big to fail. You think you don’t have to tell the customer what’s in the food product they’re buying with your company name on it? Because it’s made far away, you lost control of what goes in or gets left out or gets substituted?

You present a long list of “Maybes”. You don’t know for sure anything. This might be in it, or something else. We just don’t know for sure all the ingredients that anyone contracted to make our product puts in our product. They say they present us with a comprehensive list, but as with all food manufacturers any number of ingredients may not be available when they need them, or at the price we want to pay, or they might just run out sooner than anticipated, so they use something else, or nothing else.

You are not too big to fail. Nobody – no company, no institution, no government. Kingdoms have fallen on a whisper.

If your company does not know what’s in the product they are selling, it’s time to shrink to a point whereby you have quality controls in place at all times guaranteeing the safety for all who consume or use your product. Knowledge means safety. Tell the consumer what’s in it. They don’t trust you with their health and well-being, so stop expecting them to.

But some of it has nothing to do with safety. It has to do with preference – likes and dislikes, or morality or religion.

Further, how does your product make a person feel after they’ve ingested it? Some of it isn’t allergy-based, it’s sensitivity based. They know what makes them feel badly. You don’t. You’re not them.

You can’t fit it all on a label? Contains No Animal Products (CNAP) can fit on any label. Directing someone to your website is all well and good, but after they buy the product? Shoppers aren’t going to be surfing the net for every item they want to buy while in the grocery store. It’s not efficient. It’s not doable.

Well that’s their problem not ours.

No, that’s your problem.

CONTAINS NO ANIMAL PRODUCTS [CNAP]

Postscript > Oh, and none of this 1-5% animal product used in your product is okay to still call animal-free. No it isn’t.

Whose law is that?

My Law. That’s whose law.






Honest Labeling

You think you’re too big to fail. You think you don’t have to tell the customer what’s in the food product they’re buying with your company name on it. Because it’s made far away, you lost control of what goes in or gets left out or gets substituted. You present a long list of “Maybes”. You don’t know for sure anything. This might be in it, or something else.

We just don’t know for sure all the ingredients that anyone contracted to make our product puts into our product. They say they present us with a comprehensive list, but as with all food manufacturers any number of ingredients may not be available when they need them, or at the price we want to pay, or they might just run out sooner than anticipated, so they use something else, or nothing else.

You are not too big to fail. Nobody, no company, no institution, no government. Kingdoms have fallen on a whisper.

If your company does not know what’s in the product they are selling, it’s time to shrink to a point whereby you have quality controls in place at all times guaranteeing the safety for all who consume or use your product.

Knowledge means safety. Tell the consumer what’s in it. They don’t trust you with their health and well-being, so stop expecting them to.

We don’t only want to know the allergens in a product, because science doesn’t know yet the extent of food sensitivities and unknown allergies that raise havoc with the human organism. We want to know what is in the product, that we for whatever reason might not want to consume. Stop force-feeding us your politics and ideology and philosophy via your food products. We don’t care what you believe, we the consumer have ‘the right to know’ what we’re purchasing on our side.

Honesty is the only policy that will work. List every ingredient and the source of that ingredient > animal or plant.






 

The FDA Delays Deadline For New Nutrition Labels 

FFC COMMENT: Since science has proven that eating animals causes a myriad of diseases and disorders all food containers need to state CONTAINS ANIMAL PRODUCTS (what animal) or CONTAINS NO ANIMAL PRODUCTS.

Remember that new nutrition label that was going to help you lose weight and eat healthier? Turns out, we may have to kiss it goodbye.

FDA Proposes Major Delay In Enforcing New Nutrition Labels

There’s another new deadline, but is this one here to stay?

woman reading label

Update, October 2, 2017: After indefinitely extending the July 2018 compliance date to enforce the new and improved nutrition labels, the FDA has finally proposed a deadline. So exactly how much longer must we wait?

On September 29, the FDA announced plans to grant food manufacturers an extra year and a half to start printing the new nutrition labels on packages. This means that big companies, which the agency defines as those that rack up over $10 million in sales annually, will have until January 1, 2020 to implement the changes. Smaller companies are granted a later deadline, January 1, 2021.

So why does the agency wish to enforce the revamped labels into the next decade? Apparently, many food manufacturers claimed that they required more time to implement the changes, which negatively affects us as consumers. The FDA’s “decision to cave in to food industry demands and delay the deadline for companies to update their Nutrition Facts labels harms the public’s health, denies consumers vital information, and creates an unfair and confusing marketplace as many companies have gone ahead with the labels anyway,” Dr. Peter G. Lurie, president of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, said in a statement. Since the proposed rule is open for public comment beginning on October 2, it will allow 30 days for commentary after which it will be finalized.

Original Post, June 13, 2017: The Food and Drug Administration announced on Tuesday that it would be delaying a major upgrade to the nutrition facts panel that was set to take place in 2018.

Read on: The FDA Delays Deadline For New Nutrition Labels | Eat This Not That






 

CAMPBELL’S ANNOUNCES VOLUNTARY GMO LABELING

 

The company, which owns brands like Pepperidge Farm, Plum Organics, V8, and Prego, will begin disclosing the presence of genetically modified ingredients (GMOs) in its products — a first for a major U.S. food manufacturer.

Read More: Campbell Announces Voluntary GMO Labeling






 

WHAT CONSTITUTES ANIMAL-FREE TO ME

 ANIMAL-FREE VEGAN COMPANIES ARE STILL IN THEIR BIRTHING STAGE

What this means is that for many companies to get up and running they need to use the factories that other companies use to manufacture their goods that do contain animal products. They basically rent out the facilities, thus the common labeling of possible and/or traces of allergens – among them animal products – on their animal-free vegan goods. Continue reading →

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