Study links ‘tobacco tactics’ with marketing unhealthy products to kids | Food Dive

BRIEF

Study links ‘tobacco tactics’ with marketing unhealthy products to kids

AUTHOR Cathy Siegner

PUBLISHED March 20, 2019

Dive Brief:

A recent study from researchers at the University of California San Francisco found R.J. Reynolds and Philip Morris applied their knowledge about the tobacco industry, from marketing to product development, to increase sales of sugary drinks after acquiring food and beverage companies. According to Food Ingredients First, the study used “secret documents” from the two tobacco giants and marketing campaigns from their beverage brands, including Hawaiian Punch, Tang, Kool-Aid and Capri Sun, and Tang. The tobacco companies later sold these brands to Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Mondelez International​ and Kraft Heinz, respectively.

The researchers say the findings show that many food and beverage companies today still use similar tactics despite signing the Children’s Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative. CFBAI participants agree to comply with nutritional standards in food advertising directed at children younger than 12, including reducing sugar, sodium and saturated fat…

FINISH READING: Study links ‘tobacco tactics’ with marketing unhealthy products to kids | Food Dive






 

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Good Catch hopes consumers will bite as it launches plant-based tuna at national retailers | Food Dive

 

BRIEF

Good Catch hopes consumers will bite as it launches plant-based tuna at national retailers

AUTHOR

Cathy Siegner

PUBLISHED

Feb. 21, 2019

Dive Brief:

Plant-based tuna from Good Catch Foods will be available this week at Whole Foods Market and Thrive Market outlets nationwide, the company announced. The two retailers will be the first to carry the shelf-stable product.

The New York-based startup said in its statement it is aiming both to appeal to consumers and protect ocean fisheries with its new product. Nearly 90% of the world’s marine fish stocks are either overexploited or depleted, Good Catch said, adding that scientists predict global fisheries may totally collapse by 2048.

Plant-based tuna avoids the high mercury levels, PCBs, dioxins and other contaminants found in ocean-based fish. It also avoids the diseases and other problems presented by factory fish farming and aquaculture, the company said.

Dive Insight:

Tuna was undoubtedly a deliberate choice for this new plant-based product since it’s one of the most popular — and overfished — species in the world, according to Forbes.

Good Catch’s mission is to disrupt the seafood category with products consumers want without any of the negatives. Company officials claim it is the first plant-based brand that truly rivals real fish. The ready-to-eat products deliver the flavor and flaky texture of chunk albacore tuna, the company says, and are available in three varieties in 3.3-ounce pouches — Naked in Water, Mediterranean and Oil & Herbs.

To make its faux tuna, Good Catch uses a six-plant protein blend made from pea protein isolate, soy protein isolate, chickpea flour, lentil protein, faba protein and navy bean flour. Each serving contains 14 grams of protein, which is about 30% less than real tuna. The new products also contain algal oil for flavor and to provide a plant-based source of omega-3 fatty acids.

Consumers may be more willing to try this plant-based product when they find out it doesn’t smell like the real tuna they’re used to. Good Catch examined why people like tuna and found it was the protein, taste and texture — but not how it smells, Chad Sarno, the company’s co-founder, executive chef and vice-president of culinary, told Forbes…

FINISH READING: Good Catch hopes consumers will bite as it launches plant-based tuna at national retailers | Food Dive






 

Gingko Bioworks uses $90M funding round to launch ingredients firm Motif | Food Dive

 

BRIEF

Gingko Bioworks uses $90M funding round to launch ingredients firm Motif

AUTHOR

Cathy Siegner

PUBLISHED

Feb. 27, 2019

Dive Brief:

Startup Gingko Bioworks announced the launch of its Motif Ingredients company with a $90 million funding round. Investors included Breakthrough Energy Ventures — which has Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Michael Bloomberg and Richard Branson on its board — Louis Dreyfus Company, Fonterra and Viking Global Investors.

The biotech firm said the new company will use Ginkgo’s biological engineering platform to recreate proteins from dairy, egg and meat to use in plant-based alternatives. Motif CEO Jonathan McIntyre said in a release that consumers wrongly believe plant-based foods will be more expensive and won’t taste or function like animal-based foods. “Motif will be key to propelling the next food revolution with affordable, sustainable and accessible ingredients that meet the standards of chefs, food developers, and visionary brands,” McIntyre said. How to overcome go-to-market challenges companies with shareable, real-time insights that are fast and easy to access can mitigate losses and improve strategic planning, ultimately increasing their speed to market.

Find out how.

Dive Insight:

Ginkgo Bioworks is launching Motif Ingredients to try and locate the next big thing in protein alternatives. Consumer demand for meat substitutes and plant-based beverages jumped 17% last year, the company noted, so this could be the optimal time for a company like this. According to CNBC, Ginkgo CEO Jason Kelly started strategizing on a new ingredients company in 2017 because of the success of Impossible Foods and its plant-based Impossible Burger that “bleeds.” Bill Gates has also invested in Impossible Foods, according to Crunchbase, and he seems to have an ongoing interest in funding and developing more sustainable protein products. No doubt it will help to have such heavy hitters backing the new company.

There are plenty of plant-based competitors out there besides Impossible Burger. Beyond Foods is staking its future on the plant-based Beyond Burger, as well as plant-based sausages and chicken. Gates has financially backed Beyond Meat as well, which has posted net losses in previous years and filed for an estimated $100 million IPO last fall. Other plant-based burgers already in the market, or coming soon, include the Lightlife Burger from Lightlife Foods and Nestlé’s Garden Gourmet Incredible Burger…

FINISH READING: Gingko Bioworks uses $90M funding round to launch ingredients firm Motif | Food Dive






 

JUST Egg cracks the substitute category wide open | Food Dive

JUST Egg cracks the substitute category wide open. The mung bean-based vegan breakfast item is taking grocery shelves by storm, reinvigorating the category and aiming at new markets with big manufacturing and distribution partnerships.

AUTHOR

Megan Poinski@meganpoinski

PUBLISHED

Feb. 21, 2019

If 100 chickens were laying JUST Egg, it would take them more than 12 years to produce the same amount of mung bean-based egg replacement that has sold in the United States, Hong Kong and Singapore in four months, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture statistics.

JUST Co-founder and CEO Josh Tetrick told Food Dive the company recently crossed the benchmark of selling the equivalent of 3 million eggs. The equivalent of the last 1 million was sold in the previous 30 days, he said at the beginning of February. The strong consumer desire and the transformative possibility of a vegan egg substitute have driven rapid growth of the product, Tetrick said.

“It’s pretty fun to see because, the truth is, you never know (how popular an item will be) until it’s out there,” Tetrick said. “You can do all sorts of consumer studies and tests and invite people to your headquarters and try. But, actually, until it’s out there in the wild, you don’t actually really know.

“After appearing on restaurant menus for a few months, the San Francisco-based food tech company’s JUST Egg first appeared on grocery shelves in September. The product has already been picked up by Aramark, which serves the egg substitute in patty form at some hospital, college and corporate cafeterias. Late last month, it rolled out nationwide at grocery stores owned by Albertsons.

But all of the growth isn’t just in the United States. Earlier this month, German poultry provider PHW Group announced it was entering into a partnership to sell and distribute JUST Egg to retailers and foodservice providers across Europe. Last summer, JUST entered into a partnership with Italian egg company Eurovo to manufacture and distribute the product in Europe.

“It makes me really optimistic about the food system generally, not just about what we’re doing, that one of the biggest poultry companies in the world and the biggest egg processor in the world are the building blocks of what we’re trying to do in Europe. I think that’s a pretty extraordinary thing.” Josh Tetrick Co-founder and CEO, JUST…

FINISH READING: JUST Egg cracks the substitute category wide open | Food Dive

 






 

Why DuPont is expanding its plant-based protein nugget line | Food Dive

 

BRIEF

Why DuPont is expanding its plant-based protein nugget line

AUTHOR

Cathy Siegner

PUBLISHED

March 14, 2019

Dive Brief:

DuPont Nutrition & Health has introduced six different plant protein nuggets to its Supro and Trupro product range containing more protein or less sodium. According to Food Business News, the new ingredients are available in different formats and textures and can be used in snacks, cereals, nutrition bars and toppings.

The company’s Supro Nuggets contain 80% soy protein and less than 120 milligrams of sodium per 100 grams. The Trupro Nuggets contain 70% pea protein and are non-GMO, the company said.

“These new nuggets broaden our range of plant protein options that drive high protein content and unique textures,” said Jean Heggie, strategic marketing lead, said in a release. “Our plant-based nuggets help manufacturers differentiate their brands with improved nutritional profiles and exceptional eating experiences.

“SPONSORED BY IRCEIRCE @ RetailXIRCE @ RetailX is taking place in Chicago from June 25-28, 2019 and will cover the latest trends in the retail world.

Dive Insight:

Plant-based ingredients are just about guaranteed to inspire interest from manufacturers and consumers as one of the hottest trends in the food and beverage industry. Wrapping all these attributes into one package is likely to attract notice for DuPont from a range of product manufacturers and companies looking to check some or all of these boxes — crunch, convenience, snacking, protein, low sodium and plant-based.

Plant-based and protein-enriched are two elements that can work well together in products because combining both types of ingredients can help satiate, act as a meal replacement and supply important nutrients, particularly for the growing number of people looking beyond meat and dairy sources for their protein…

FINISH READING: Why DuPont is expanding its plant-based protein nugget line | Food Dive






 

Why Kellogg’s MorningStar Farms is going 100% plant based | Food Dive

 

Q&A

Why Kellogg’s MorningStar Farms is going 100% plant based

AUTHOR

Lillianna Byington@lil_byington

PUBLISHED

March 13, 2019

As the plant-based trend spreads, Kellogg is using its MorningStar Farms business to move forward as a leader in the space.

At Natural Products Expo West last week, the legacy veggie protein brand launched a new vegan “Cheezeburger” and announced its commitment for its portfolio to be 100% vegan by 2021.

The new promise will allow Kellogg to expand the accessibility of its plant-based products and reduce its use of more than 300 million egg whites a year. MorningStar Farms’ full product line includes Falafel, Meat Lovers, Veggie Lovers and Tex-Mex burgers as well as Chik’n nuggets and patties. But they aren’t stopping there.

Melissa Cash, head of global marketing, strategy and innovation for plant-based protein and natural brands at Kellogg, talked to Food Dive at Expo West about how the brand plans to launch more plant-based products in the coming years, why they chose this new vegan burger and how more consumers are shifting their tastes to plant-based products.

This interview has been edited for clarity and brevity…

FINISH READING: Why Kellogg’s MorningStar Farms is going 100% plant based | Food Dive






 

Fast-growing chickens presents texture issue for the industry | Food Dive

 

BRIEF

Fast-growing chickens presents texture issue for the industry

AUTHOR

Jessi Devenyns

PUBLISHED

March 20, 2019

Dive Brief:

After years of breeding chickens to grow rapidly and produce the maximum amount of breast muscle possible, poultry producers are running into problems. They include woody breasts, similar to chewing leather, and squishy fillets known as “spaghetti meat,” according to The Wall Street Journal.

Researchers at the University of Arkansas estimated it will take an extra $200 million in industry expenses for companies to identify and divert breast fillets that are too tough, squishy or striped with bands of white tissue to sell in restaurants or grocery stores.

Some commercial poultry consumers such as Wendy’s and Whole Foods have switched to purchasing smaller, slower-growing birds in an effort to circumvent undesired textures, The Wall Street Journal noted. Chicken industry officials are confident they will be able to minimize the meat texture problems caused by genetic selection, but it will take several years to do so.

How to overcome go-to-market challenges companies with shareable, real-time insights that are fast and easy to access can mitigate losses and improve strategic planning, ultimately increasing their speed to market.

Find out how.

Dive Insight:

Texture is an emerging challenge within the poultry industry. After decades of working to produce more chickens faster, breeders can now grow a 6.3-pound birds in 47 days, according to the National Chicken Council — roughly twice as fast as 50 years ago. Although this rate of production can be beneficial for the bottom line — chicken breasts can be sold at a 13% premium compared to overall wholesale chicken meat prices, The Wall Street Journal noted — it can actually be detrimental to sales if consumers don’t like the taste. Even if scientists are unsure as to what is causing these strange textures, consumers are noticing the change and that can hurt sales. Chicken producers have seen a drop in demand recently and these textures don’t help…

FINISH READING: Fast-growing chickens presents texture issue for the industry | Food Dive



TRANSLATES TO: Poultry Industry Scared






 

Harmful Algal Blooms | Nutrient Pollution 

Harmful Algal Blooms

Harmful algal blooms are a major environmental problem in all 50 states. Red tides, blue-green algae, and cyanobacteria are examples of harmful algal blooms that can have severe impacts on human health, aquatic ecosystems, and the economy.

Algal blooms can be toxic. Keep people and pets away from water that is green, scummy or smells bad…

Harmful algal blooms are overgrowths of algae in water. Some produce dangerous toxins in fresh or marine water but even nontoxic blooms hurt the environment and local economies…

READ ON: Harmful Algal Blooms | Nutrient Pollution | US EPA






 

Ohio Sells $75k in Successful First Day of Sales

Ohio Sells $75k in Successful First Day of Sales

PUBLISHED ON JANUARY 22, 2019, BY MASSROOTS

The four medical marijuana dispensaries that were open for business, on the first day of sales in Ohio, collectively sold 8.7 pounds of dried cannabis flower. According to the Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program, that total volume generated $75,000 in sales. There are 60 licenses available in Ohio, but only four dispensaries were fully approved and stocked with product on January 16, 2018, the historical first day of legal sales.

The four dispensaries are:

CY+ Dispensary, 180 Main St. in Wintersville, OH

The Forest Sandusky, 1671 Tiffin Ave. in Sandusky, OH

Ohio Valley Natural Relief, 840 Canton Rd. in Wintersville, OH

The Botanist, 3840 Greentree Ave. SW in Canton, OH

While products for other methods of delivery, like edibles, capsules, tinctures, and topical lotions may be manufactured in Ohio, dried flower was the only form available on the first day.

The Ohio Tenth

Unlike the regulated markets in states like Colorado and Washington, all medical marijuana flower in the Buckeye State must be sold in packages measured to one-tenth of an ounce, known as the “Ohio tenth.” One-tenth of an ounce is 2.83 grams. This is slightly different than how it is typically done at dispensaries in other legal states, and on the black market, where flower is often sold by the gram, the eighth of an ounce, quarter of an ounce, and so on, all the way up.

The Price You Pay

As initially high prices were shocking to some patients, the cost of medical marijuana in Ohio is expected to drop slightly as more dispensaries open, and a wider variety of products become available. Joan Caleodis, 55, is credited as the first person to purchase medical marijuana in Ohio. Joan reported that she paid $150.00 for three of the one-tenth ounce packages of the same indica strain. “I’m ecstatic patients are no longer waiting for relief,” Joan said.

Home cultivation remains illegal, so patients have no other legal option but to pay whatever the going rate is for medication at the dispensary. “I understand the need to make back the money they put in, but this is – my god,” said Ken Horner, 65, who drove 3.5 hours from Dayton to CY+ Dispensary in Wintersville.

Patient Cards

Are you a patient suffering from one of the conditions that qualify for medical marijuana in Ohio? Do you still need to apply to the program? Follow this link to learn how to get a medical marijuana card in Ohio.

Photo courtesy of Chris Crook

Source: Ohio Sells $75k in Successful First Day of Sales


 





 

Eating meat has ‘dire’ consequences for the planet, says report

 

Eating meat has ‘dire’ consequences for the planet, says report

To feed a growing global population and curtail climate change, scientists say we need to radically change our food systems.

BY SARAH GIBBENS

PUBLISHED JANUARY 16, 2019

THERE’S AN ENTIRE industry built around dieting. Most of its products are intended to help people lose weight, gain muscle, or live longer.

But as the global human population steadily climbs, scientists are scrambling to devise a diet plan that can feed 10 billion people by 2050.

A new report, published in the British medical journal The Lancet, claims to do just that. It recommends a largely plant-based diet, with small, occasional allowances for meat, dairy, and sugar. The report was compiled by a group of 30 scientists from around the world who study nutrition or food policy. For three years, they deliberated with the intent of creating recommendations that could be adopted by governments to meet the challenge of feeding a growing world population.

“Even small increases in the consumption of red meat or dairy foods would make this goal difficult or impossible to achieve,” a summary of the report states.

The report’s authors reached their conclusions by weighing different side-effects of food production. They included greenhouse gases, water and crop use, nitrogen or phosphorous from fertilizers, and the potential for biodiversity to take a hit should a region be converted into farmland. By managing all these factors, the report’s authors say climate change-inducing gases could be reduced and enough land could be reserved to feed the world’s growing population.

Under the report’s conclusions, meat and sugar consumption around the world should drop by 50 percent. Who eats less meat and where will vary, says Jessica Fanzo, a report author and professor of food policy and ethics at Johns Hopkins University. Meat consumption in the U.S., for instance, would have to go down and be replaced by fruits and vegetables. But other countries already facing poor nutrition could incorporate meat into roughly three percent of their diet.

Eating meat has ‘dire’ consequences for the planet, says report.

“We’ll be in dire straits,” if no action is taken, says Fanzo.

Following a vegan trend

Recommendations to scale back meat consumption aren’t new. Just this past October, a study published in the journal Nature set similar guidelines for reducing meat and sugar consumption.

What’s different about this new report, says Fanzo, are the steps outlined to put such a change into place.

Branded what the authors call a “Great Food Transformation,” it outlines strategies that range from the least active, simply sharing information, to the most aggressive, eliminating consumer choice…

FINISH READING: Eating meat has ‘dire’ consequences for the planet, says report






 

Naked Labs raises $14 million for its body scanner mirror

These entrepreneurs invented a futuristic ‘magic mirror’ to take on the bathroom scale — and investors say its groundbreaking tech could transform the future of fitness

# AFC SCALES & MIRRORS uncensored

These entrepreneurs invented a futuristic ‘magic mirror’ to take on the bathroom scale — and investors say its groundbreaking tech could transform the future of fitness

Zoë Bernard Aug. 4, 2018, 3:19 PM

Naked LabsCalifornia-based startup Naked Labs just unveiled its flagship product: a high-tech mirror and scale that delivers precise information on your body including weight, height, BMI, and measurements.

Naked Labs also closed a $14 million funding round led by Founders Fund which included investments from NEA, Lumia, and early Uber and SpaceX investor Cyan Banister.

Naked Lab’s co-founder Ed Sclater says he has ambitions for his product’s tech in the fields of retail, medical care, and more.

For Ed Sclater, co-founder of Northern California-based startup Naked Labs, climbing onto the scale isn’t just an age-old, necessary but often depressing bathroom ritual, it’s an approach to health and fitness that’s potentially damaging.

“If you get on a traditional…

View original post 68 more words

Toast Is Okay After All

Now you know the science behind the caramelization process of cooked foods. But it’s also good for you.

Read On > The browning of the toast or searing of the veggies or meats, once thought to cause cancer actually helps prevent it via the Maillard Reaction.






 

The bread crust is better-for-you than the rest of the bread, say scientists

Taxing red meat would save many lives, research shows

Taxing red meat would save many lives, research shows

The cost of bacon and sausages would double if the harm they cause to people’s health was taken into account

Damian Carrington Environment editor Tue 6 Nov 2018 13.00 EST Last modified on Tue 6 Nov 2018 14.00 EST


A ‘sin tax’ on meat products such as beef, lamb and pork is inevitable in the longer term, say some experts. Taxing red meat would save many lives and raise billions to pay for healthcare, according to new research. It found the cost of processed meat such as bacon and sausages would double if the harm they cause to people’s health was taken into account.

Governments already tax harmful products to reduce their consumption, such as sugar, alcohol and tobacco. With growing evidence of the health and environmental damage resulting from red meat, some experts now believe a “sin tax” on beef, lamb and pork is inevitable in the longer term.

The World Health Organization declared processed red meat to be a carcinogen in 2015, and unprocessed red meat such as steaks and chops to be a probable carcinogen. However, people in rich nations eat more than the recommended amount of red meat, which is also linked to heart disease, strokes and diabetes.

The new research looked at the level of tax needed to reflect the healthcare costs incurred when people eat red meat. It found that a 20% tax on unprocessed red meat and a 110% tax on the more harmful processed products across rich nations, with lower taxes in less wealthy nations, would cut annual deaths by 220,000 and raise $170bn (£130bn)…

FINISH READING: Taxing red meat would save many lives, research shows | Environment | The Guardian


ALSO:  PETA SUPPORTS TAXING MEAT


 





 

Tofurky Wants to Save the World, One Thanksgiving Roast at a Time. It’s Now Sold 5 Million

Tofurky Wants to Save the World, One Thanksgiving Roast at a Time. It’s Now Sold 5 Million

John Patrick Pullen Fri, Nov 16 6:30 AM EST

Ah, Thanksgiving: the annual holiday when Americans gather around the table with the people they’re closest to (genetically, at least) for a feast of traditional food, prayers, stories of gratefulness, and—hopefully silent— judgments about their friends and family. ‘I bet she voted for you-know-who,’ one likely muses. ‘He said what about my football team?’ wonders another. And, the more and more common refrain, ‘They’re serving a Tofurky this year!?’

But Tofurky is a lot more than simply the maker of the football-sized tofu loaf that’s helped give vegetarians and vegans a seat at the Thanksgiving table. A punchline practically since its founding, the Hood River, Ore. company has ridden out nearly four decades of good-natured ridicule to become one of the world’s leading meat-alternative makers, and perhaps the most recognized name in a space that’s been rushed by venture-backed startups like Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat.

And as the calendar turns towards another gravy-fueled holiday, the company has announced that it will sell its 5 millionth Thanksgiving roast this year—a number that proves Tofurky is no joke. (Though its not exactly a threat to the traditional bird: Americans buy 46 million turkeys each Thanksgiving.) Still, the milestone is about more than just sales, the company says.

“That’s five million times somebody took a personal risk to show up to a Thanksgiving meal with something that was weird,” says Erin Ransom, Tofurky’s head of marketing. “It’s five million times that somebody put the roast on the table and said ‘Try it with me—and if you like it that’s cool. Maybe there’s more for you in this way of eating.”

“Research suggests that all those risky dishes are starting to pay off. According to NPD’s annual Eating Patterns in America report, 14% of Americans are using plant-based proteins as a substitute for meat on a regular basis. In fact, nearly one in ten are eschewing meats that come from animals, with 1% of people identifying as vegan or vegetarian, and 8% partaking in flexitarian diets, which means they’re primarily vegetarian but occasionally partake in meat or fish. And they’re not just forgoing flesh over ethical or humane concerns; health and environmental worries are also causing people to rethink how they eat.“

That’s not a fad,” says Chase Worthen, a buyer of vegetarian products for Walmart, which stocks Tofurky products in 4,000 of its stores. “It’s a trend that’s here to stay.”…

FINISH READING: Tofurky Wants to Save the World, One Thanksgiving Roast at a Time. It’s Now Sold 5 Million






 

California bill banning sale of animal-tested cosmetics goes to governor 

A proposal that passed the California Legislature on Friday would impose the nation’s strictest laws on animal testing for cosmetics.  Senate Bill 1249 would make California the first state to outlaw the sale of cosmetics tested on animals.

The ban applies to animal testing of a cosmetic or its ingredients conducted after 2019, but would allow exceptions to comply with Food and Drug Administration or foreign agency requirements.

In the final days of the session, legislators amended SB 1249 to narrow the ban’s scope, focusing on animal testing conducted by the cosmetic manufacturer or suppliers. The earlier version, which met significant opposition, applied even when the group conducting the animal testing was unrelated to the cosmetics company. That version would have prevented companies from using ingredients where animal tests were required for non-cosmetic reasons, including testing to ensure a chemical does not cause cancer.

“The supply-chain focus has helped to remove the majority of significant opposition,” said the bill’s author, Sen. Cathleen Galgiani (D-Stockton).

Lawmakers also removed a provision that would have put a 2023 expiration date on the foreign regulations exemption.

Central to the debate was China, where imported cosmetics are tested on animals. Opponents of SB 1249 said the measure would prompt companies to move manufacturing to China, eliminating American jobs.

Supporters, however, said the Chinese law was weakly enforced and likely to change before the foreign regulations exemption expired. They pointed to animal-free companies that have successfully managed to market products to Chinese consumers.

The bill’s new language keeps the foreign regulations exemption in place indefinitely, as long the manufacturer does not use animal testing evidence to guarantee the product’s safety in California. After the changes were made, the Personal Care Products Council, which opposed the previous version, expressed its support.

Other backers included…

FINISH READING: California bill banning sale of animal-tested cosmetics goes to governor after last-minute changes shrink its scope






 

Bayer’s Monsanto faces 8,000 lawsuits on glyphosate 

Bayer’s Monsanto faces 8,000 lawsuits on glyphosate

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – The number of U.S. lawsuits brought against Bayer’s (BAYGn.DE) newly acquired Monsanto has jumped to about 8,000, as the German drugmaker braces for years of legal wrangling over alleged cancer risks of glyphosate-based weedkillers.

Bayer had previously disclosed 5,200 such lawsuits against Monsanto, which it acquired in a $63 billion deal completed in June.“The number of plaintiffs in both state and federal litigation is approximately 8,000 as of end-July. These numbers may rise or fall over time but our view is that the number is not indicative of the merits of the plaintiffs’ cases,” Bayer Chief Executive Werner Baumann told analysts in a conference call on Thursday…

FINISH READING: Bayer’s Monsanto faces 8,000 lawsuits on glyphosate | Reuters






 

After the biggest stock market sell-off in history, what’s next for Facebook? 

 

After the biggest stock market sell-off in history, what’s next for Facebook?

Social media giant posts big profit, but other numbers show potential long-term problems

Pete Evans · CBC News · Posted: Jul 28, 2018 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: July 28

Facebook still earns massive profits, but the company learned a harsh lesson this week about managing investor expectations.

When Facebook posted its quarterly results on Wednesday, the stock market sell-off that followed was dramatic.

By the time the market closed the next day, the company had lost $100 billion in shareholder value.

It was the biggest sell-off in Wall Street history.

A market meltdown like that inevitably left the company’s investors wondering “What’s next for Facebook?”

 *Facebook should be liable for ‘fake news,’ British lawmakers say

*In privacy fight, we’re asking Facebook the wrong questions

After all, it wasn’t a set of ugly numbers that sent investors to the exit. The company still made gobs of money — more than $5 billion in profit, in fact. But the sell-off was sparked by fears that the endless growth may soon come to an end.

To Ramona Pringle, a CBC columnist and media professor at Ryerson University in Toronto, the company’s main problem is the same one that has felled many of its technological ancestors — you’re cool, until you’re not.

And to young people at least, the world’s biggest social media company is decidedly not.

“Talk to anyone under 22,” she says, “and they’re not on Facebook.”

FINISH READING: After the biggest stock market sell-off in history, what’s next for Facebook? | CBC






 

Meat and Dairy Surpass Oil Companies as Largest Pollutants

Meat and Dairy Surpass Oil Companies as Largest Pollutants

The world’s five biggest meat and dairy producers emit more combined greenhouse gases than ExxonMobil, Shell, or BP, the top three oil production companies, according to a new report by GRAIN and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP).

Researchers tracked greenhouse gas emissions for 35 of the largest producers of beef, pork, poultry, and dairy.

Researchers found that the companies’ emissions are reaching dangerous levels due to unregulated growth and governmental subsidies to ensure inexpensive production costs and supplies such as animal grain.

The report calls for a reduction of greenhouse gases by 38 billion tons by 2050. The report states that many of the largest meat and dairy producers do not report emissions, and many are increasing production with no efforts in place to reduce their emissions. If production remains unregulated, by 2050, meat and dairy farms will account for 80 percent of the budgeted greenhouse gas emissions…

Emissions impossible: How big meat and dairy are heating up the planet. GRAIN and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP) web site. Available at:https://www.grain.org/article/entries/5976–impossible-how-big-meat-and-dairy-are-heating-up-the-planet. Published July 18, 2018. Accessed July 19, 2018.

https://www.pcrm.org/






 

Did You know That Oreo Cookies Were Vegan?

I still don’t like them. The creamy center isn’t creamy at all. Maybe I’ll give them a try again. I’ll have to be sure to buy some nut milk for dunking.

Later.