John Robbins of Diet For A New America

A powerful wave of awakening is sweeping across the earth today. Everywhere people are realizing that we have been unnecessarily fighting a war against the environment, against animals, and against ourselves. In every part of the world people are now wanting to bring their lives into deeper alignment with more life affirmative values and a respect for Creation and its creatures.

But to many the prospect of becoming vegetarian seems like a deprivation. You may grant that it’s healthier, kinder and lighter on our resource base to avoid animal products, but, you may say, you like the finer things in life, and do not want to survive on brown rice and tofu. You want to be healthy, yes, but perhaps wonder if it’s worth it if it requires a diet of alfalfa sprouts, wheat germ and mashed yeast.

In COOKING WITHOUT ANIMALS Sharon Davies-Tight has come to the rescue, and banished such fears. For her book is a connoisseur’s delight, impeccably designed for the person who enjoys cooking, and considers creating edible delights to be one of lifes worthy achievements. The recipes are clearly thought out, and presented with crystal clear clarity. The detail and variety are impressive, and the result is a book that treats the preparing of meals as a high art.

COOKING WITHOUT ANIMALS may well be the most comprehensive guide to purely vegetarian gourmet cooking yet written.

Sharon obviously loves cooking, and does not cut corners when the price would be a compromise in the final product. Nothing is half-baked, vague or left to your imagination. In fact, the directions could not be easier to understand, and can lead even a rank amateur to the culinary heights of expertise. If you want to expand your repertoire of non-animal fare, she’s your lady. Be advised though, that if you want to go very low-fat, and stay with what are termed as “health foods”, such as whole grain baked goods, this book may not be for you. It’s for people to whom the creation of fine cuisine without the products of animal suffering is the goal, not the elimination of all packaged or refined foods.

With every passing day more and more people are seeing that how we treat other beings says something important about us as people. The treatment of animals in contemporary factory farms is so appallingly cruel that you do not have to be in any way sentimental to find it unacceptable. The vegetarian journey is made easier by books such as COOKING WITHOUT ANIMALS, which yields to none in delights for the palate.

Choosing to no longer swallow the products of pain is an act, not only of compassion for the animals, but of self-respect. As Sharon says, you have every reason to be proud of yourself for taking such a step. She’s proud of you; and so am I.

~ John Robbins, author, DIET FOR A NEW AMERICA


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What Does Animal-Free Mean?

ANIMAL-FREE VEGAN COMPANIES ARE STILL IN THEIR BIRTHING STAGE

What this means is that for many companies to get up and running they need to use the factories that other companies use to manufacture their goods that do contain animal products. They basically rent out the facilities, thus the common labeling of possible and/or traces of allergens – among them animal products – on their animal-free vegan goods.

There are very few animal-free vegan companies that build their own factories. Most simply can’t afford the cost. So until such time that the demand for animal-free vegan goods increases to the point where they can stand on their own, I accept that there may be traces of animal products in the animal-free vegan products that I purchase. They can clean the equipment between uses, but it’s nearly impossible to wipe out all traces of what was previously manufactured on the same equipment.

My criterion for animal-free is that the recipe | formula itself contain no animal products.

If my French fries that I order at a restaurant are fried in the same oil that chicken is fried, I will eat the fries. The demand isn’t popular enough for restaurants to have essentially two kitchens – one for animal-free, one for animals. For me to refuse to eat out, doesn’t make any sense, since evolution takes time, and my presence at a restaurant ordering an animal-free dish matters. It shows the chefs, the workers, the patrons that I want to eat there, but I don’t want any animals in my food.

There’s not a magic wand we vegans are going to wave, whereby one day we wake up and all manufacturing companies and restaurants suddenly decide to convert their manufacturing plants and eating establishments to animal-free vegan – and then instantly follow through on it.

Veganism is spreading more rapidly than in the past, still, the way restaurants are currently responding to that trend is by focusing more on vegetarian (including eggs and dairy) than on all vegetable/plant-based.

There’s a Chinese restaurant I go to where the chef makes tofu – to date about eight different ways. Delicious! with many different sauces and combinations of vegetables and fruit. He of course has a full animal-based menu. For me not to eat there because he cooks animals would be counterproductive to the movement. Chefs evolve just like everybody else, and often meet resistance from those who want to hold onto their traditional ways of cooking. If there aren’t enough vegan customers to keep them in business (which there aren’t), all the restaurants will go out of business. And then where will we be?

Then there’s the grocery stores. If I won’t shop at a grocery store that sells meat, I won’t eat, because there aren’t enough of them that are totally vegan.

That will all change, but in the meanwhile I’m going to be part of that change, by supporting animal-free vegan companies that may have traces of animal products in their animal-free vegan goods, because they can’t yet afford to build their own factories, and I will eat at animal-based restaurants that care enough about my business to make me a delicious animal-free meal.

Although we’ve come a long way, we are still in the birthing stage of making our dreams of a cruelty-free planet a reality everywhere. Giving up because we’re not yet there is not an option I give myself.

The animals need us at every stage and juncture of the evolutionary process to free them.

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The Contradiction Issue

Upon choosing a healthier more compassionate diet, you will be challenged by those who have not yet taken that step, to defend your decision to not eat animals. They will argue that your animal-free diet contradicts your other animal using behaviors, thus making the issue of killing animals not worthy of consideration. They will point to your leather shoes, your wool sweater, your prescription drugs in a capsule, and the operation you may have had at some point in your life, which was the result of animal experimentation. They will look closely at what you eat, laying in waiting, ready to pounce, should you inadvertently or advertently consume any semblance of an animal product.

They will present you with a myriad of arguments: We slaughter animals because we raise them for slaughter; we’re at the top of the food chain; they don’t contribute to society; God gave us permission; they taste good; we’ve always done it; everyone else does it; men developed large arm muscles with which to hunt; we developed canine teeth with which to tear flesh; animals kill each other; it’s a matter of survival; we’re superior; plants scream when pulled from the ground; they’re dumb; they can’t feel pain or fright; they would otherwise suffer from overpopulation and starvation, all the while keeping you on the defensive, in order that you not offend – them and their right to consume animals.

What gives us the right to raise anyone for slaughter? An animal in captivity has the same capacity to feel pain, fright, and loneliness as an animal who is free. The only difference is that one gets a death sentence before s/he is born, and subsequently suffers accordingly. I suppose that being at the top of the food chain is not a bad place to be, unless we’re ever invaded by aliens who have a penchant for humans. My guess is that we’d get rid of that “next down balance of nature”  theory  real quick.

One cannot measure contribution, however, if one could, animals would be categorized as contributing a great deal to any society. However, animals do not exist on this planet for the benefit of humans; they exist for their own benefit. And I sure would like to meet the person God told that we could use the animals as we saw fit. Since when did the word dominion come to mean use, abuse and destroy? Humans wrote the bible. Where God’s inspiration left off and their self-serving motives began is a little unclear.

If we happen to be stronger than some animals, that in itself does not give us the right to use and abuse them. Nothing gives us that right. As far as tasting good, so might we. But we don’t do it, because we know that it is wrong. So whether we like it or not, rightness and wrongness is at issue here. If a woman has always battered her children, does that make it right? Of course not. If we continued to do everything we’ve always done just because we’ve always done it we’d never progress. The effort to civilize must continue.

…and who says a couple of billion of people can’t be wrong? Of course they can. The majority is not always right. If we did everything our neighbors did, we would be slaves to their desires, and our destinies would be in their hands.

Why men developed stronger musculature than women, nobody really knows; they can only conjecture. However, if men’s muscle development were contingent upon the amount of food they brought home from their hunts, they never would have developed, since 80% of all food gathered was close to home in the form of nuts and berries, by women who carried large baskets as well as children for hours at a time while they walked and worked. So, if hard labor was the precipitating factor in developing high levels of testosterone in men, thus giving them strong muscles with which to kill animals, then women would have developed high levels of this hormone as well, which they didn’t. Be that as it may, men’s arm muscles were used for a lot more than pulling strings on bows and arrows. And about these so-called canine teeth: these teeth are needed to open nuts, tear stalks, peel fruit and eat vegetables. I do not tear flesh, but consider these teeth important to the enjoyment of my food.

All other animals do not kill each other to eat. In fact, most animals are vegetarians. But regardless of whether an animal or human kills another, that does not give us the right to do it. Why do what somebody else does when you know the pain and suffering those actions cause?  Our judgments regarding what’s necessary for survival are biased by our own desires, habits, and previous as well as on-going conditioning by our parents, our peers, the medical profession, scientists for hire, and advertising campaigns designed by companies that want you to buy their products. If eating animals was such a cure all for what ails us, there wouldn’t be so many hospitals and nursing homes filled with sick people. Eating animals hinders our health by injecting too much saturated fat, protein and salt into our systems.

Superiority is always bad for the ones marked inferior, whether it be an ethnic group, a race, a religious group, an age group, a sex, a socioeconomic group, the homeless, the handicapped, the unemployed, anyone with an IQ below 120, anyone who challenges the status quo. The perception of being superior gives no one authority over another’s life. We all witnessed, in some way, the systematic slaughter of millions of humans initiated solely by the erroneous assumption of superiority of one ethnic group over another.  This is what we as humans are doing to the animals–with impunity.

…but to go so far as to claim that plants scream when pulled from the ground and use this to justify the continuation of slaughter, leaves those of us with compassionate minds no room for compassionate choices – a clever tactic from the crafty minds of those who profit from our consumption of their products. All movement makes sound. When magnified thousands of times, even something as harmless as plucking a hair from your own head, will sound pretty horrifying.

I’m sure you don’t really believe that those who can’t take intelligence tests designed for humans (or even humans who score low on such tests) are not intelligent. Animals are aware, can solve problems, use tools, communicate with each other and humans, etc. I have three dogs who have not been trained through fear to submit to my will, and their intelligence levels continue to enlighten me. The way they manipulate their environment is astounding. But even if they (or anyone else) were not as intelligent as another, that does not give us the right to hurt them. And if you think that animals can’t feel pain, then think again. When an animal is injured and squeals, why do you think they are squealing? Because they feel good? Of course not. They squeal because they hurt – just as you would. Animals do not always let you know that they are hurting – just as humans don’t. But people will assuage their consciences by telling themselves that the animals cannot feel the abuses committed against them. So why don’t they run from their aggressors? Because animals are trusting creatures – as are humans. However, the fault doesn’t lie in trusting – the fault lies in the self-serving minds of those who abuse power – for whatever reason or to whatever end.

What takes the cake are the hunters who stuff the heads of their prey and hang them on their office walls, all in the name of compassion. This concept of killing those we perceive as suffering is a frightening one. Why not go into the forests with food and medical supplies instead of guns? What will they do next, go into China, India, Africa, and solve their overpopulation and starvation problems with bullets? If I dare speak for the animals, I think they’d rather take their chances with nature. I know I would. But starvation of humans or animals need not exist anywhere on this planet. There is plenty of food to go around.  Once again, the problem lies in the crafty minds of those who abuse power – for their own selfish end. But to get back to the hunters – they hunt for the thrill of killing – nothing more. Anything else they derive from the sport can be accomplished on a picnic in the woods.

My final response to the accusation that my animal-free diet contradicts my other animal using behaviors, is simply that I didn’t create this pervasive multi-billion dollar animal abusing industry. The mass abuse (and killing is abuse) of animals by humans was not created overnight and it won’t be eliminated all at once. But I recognize the situation as unacceptable, and I’m doing something about it. I believe that change is possible, and through changing ourselves, we change the world. We have to start somewhere, so I’m starting with my diet (the meat went first, then the eggs, then dairy – and none of these went all at once). The leather shoes will go next, then the wool. All the while, new animal-free products will replace the old. And, new more effective research will be developed eliminating the use of animals in scientific experiments. I see the future as bright, and I’m doing my share, one step at a time, to make this a healthier more civilized planet for all of God’s creatures. However, as long as killing animals remains socially acceptable, you will be expected to defend your choice not to participate–and in my case, it is my pleasure to do that!

Cooking and eating animal-free takes us a step further along the path of civilization and your first step, no matter how small or faltering, contributes to the direction of this process. There is no contradiction here!

God bless you,

Sharon Lee Davies-Tight, the animal-free chef






Pest Prevention

MY PANTRY JARS

If you live in an apartment as I do, then you can’t have any open containers, boxes or bags of food. Everything I open goes into a jar with a tight-fitting lid.

If I open a box of cereal, I don’t roll down the clear waxed bag inside the box, thinking pests won’t find it. They’ll find it. After opening, I empty the box into a jar. If I use half a box of pasta, I don’t surmise that pests won’t like it anyway. I don’t take a chance. In the jar it goes.

Containers with tight-fitting lids are available at every dollar store. They’re cheap. Buy a cheap bookcase to put them on. Find room. You’ll be glad you did.

Every night before I retire, I empty the trash and wipe down the inside of the trash container, even though it had a bag in it. There is never any food out unless I’m cooking or eating, and when I’m done it promptly gets put away.

There is no such thing as leaving the dishes till morning, or saying just one night won’t hurt. Yes it will. Wipe down your counters, sinks and stove with soapy water at the end of the evening, being sure all crumbs are gone. Sweep your kitchen floor, so everything is fresh when you rise in the morning.

When you move into a new apartment, go under your sinks – kitchen and bathroom. Plug up the holes around the pipes into the wall with fine grade steel wool. Then seal the openings with duck tape. Landlords won’t mind. In fact they’ll like it. Then every year or so, redo them. Tapes get old and buildings settle.

If everybody did their part of controlling pests in their own living spaces, then apartment buildings wouldn’t be so over-run with them.


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I Want An Animal-Free Mall

I WANT AN ANIMAL-FREE MALL

That’s right. A mall. Animal-free. A big one. With lots of glitter and big lights. With every kind of shop. Grocery, bakery, deli, shoe store, pet supply shop, clothes, hair salon using only cruelty-free products, and on and on, restaurants too. Good ones. I have a vision. And it’s a nice one. No fur, no leather, no skins, and those who enter must wear all animal-free attire. This place has rules. No cruelty here. Yes, that’s right. That’s what I want. A happy place too. No vegetarian snobbery. There’s no place for arrogance in the animal-free world of Sharon Lee. No suffering looks on the faces of people who feel they’re being deprived.

Now that I mention it, I see that on a lot of vegetarian faces. Faces that still have Big Mac lines on them, so it’s not the deprivation causing the look. But it’s there. Maybe it’s the prejudice and discrimination directed at such folks that makes them so unhappy, especially when they’re doing something so right.

It’s okay to have fun while you do what’s right. It’s okay to laugh. God, my God, wants happiness. Every burst of laughter coming from one of It’s animal’s mouths delight’s It to no end. That’s one more frown It doesn’t have to turn upside down. So, laugh. Have fun. Enjoy your life. Just don’t kill the animals. That’s all. Not a lot to ask. And don’t participate by eating the catches of other people. If you do, try harder next time, till you get it right. I’m tired and sick and fed up and depressed (that doesn’t mean I’m not happy) over walking down the aisles of death in every supermarket in the world.

I’m offended and pained at being forced to view and smell the tortured, dismembered bodies of my animal friends. When is it all going to end? Entrepreneurs is what we need. Animal-free entrepreneurs. People with dreams. Big ones. Investors with money that flows in a cruelty-free world. Not just the small, never grow any bigger, shops sprouting up here and there. Though that’s a start and we have to start somewhere, so we’ll support them too. But bigger stores, and big chains of every conceivable market transformed into animal-free.

Fast food. Animal-Free Chefs. Veggie Burgers. Veggie Deli’s. Veggie Pizza Parlors. No animals nor animal products. Veggie cheese. Plant meats that taste like baloney, ham and turkey, but without the suffering. We don’t need featherless chickens; we need to free the chicken. International animal-free cuisines. I’m tired of having my animal-free products supplied by purveyors of torture. Why should I have to eat my vegetarian meal in a slaughterhouse? Why should I have to buy my clothes at a slaughterhouse? Aren’t you sick of it too? Being given your little vegetarian or vegan corner of somebody else’s house of cruelty? Just to satisfy a small segment of the market? Small segment?

Well, it wouldn’t be so small if more animal-free entrepreneurs with big ideas and big investors gave people what they really wanted: a cruelty-free world, which means a cruelty-free shopping mall. We could do it if we’d stop thinking so small. Big. Think big. Demand big. Stop trying to get your animal-free products in slaughterhouses. How absurd. Build your own stores. Start small if you want, but grow, by golly, grow. Give the people what they want before they ask for it. You know what people want. You’ve been silent too long. Too complacent. Okay, ‘I guess I’ll take whatever vegetarian crumbs they throw my way’ type of silence.

Plan the future. Make the future. See the future through God’s eyes. See big. See beautiful. I want an animal-free shopping mall. And then another, and another till we put the slaughterhouse malls out of business. Till we close the doors on the business of cruelty. I want an animal-free mall. And, I know you want it too. One for all people–and all other animals too. No zoo here, but a place where our animals can come shopping with us. Day care, mall care, for our furry family members while we shop. A mall with style, flair, with sparkle and bright lights. I can see it. I know you can too. Cause I’m looking through God’s eyes now and so are you.






 

Cut Out The Processing Animal – go straight to the top

We grow more plants to feed animals whom we kill to eat, than we grow to feed humans.

But when we eat the animals we’re not getting the benefit of all those veggies eaten by all those animals, because the veggies are no longer veggies.

The veggies eaten by the animal builds muscle, fat and bone as well as maintains all organs and systems of the animal. Knowing that, why not eat the plants in their natural form instead of processing them through an animal?

If plants build muscle, fat and bone as well as maintain all organs and other systems in the animal you’re eating, then why not cut out the middle man/woman and eat plants directly, letting our own bodies build from the benefit?

People who want corn fed cows or grass fed cows are making a connection between what a cow eats and what they want to put, pre-processed by the animal, into their bodies. But these same people won’t eat corn. It makes no logical sense to get the benefits of corn after a cow has eaten it. When you eat a cow you’re not getting the benefit of the corn. You have to eat the corn to get that benefit.

We don’t get two in one by processing veggies in the animal before we eat the animal.

Cut out the middle man/woman – the processing animal – so we get our plant food in it’s non-processed form.

Then stop raising animals to eat.

Feeding animals veggies and other animals, then killing them for our plate isn’t an efficient way to feed humans.

I always preferred going straight to the top, avoiding unnecessary red-tape.

Why use an animal to process my food before consuming it?

So of course, I go straight to the plant for my nutrients.

~ Sharon Lee Davies-Tight






 

Take A Step Out Of The Ugly Past

TAKE A STEP OUT OF THE UGLY PAST

I’m going to keep using the words meat, meaty, to describe the main part and/or texture of the plant until such time that meat = plant. In other words, animals will not be considered meat nor food in the future.

I will not, however, refer to a plant as an animal – nor an animal as a plant. For instance an eggplant isn’t meat, meaning animal. A burger made out of eggplant however will be called plant meat.

Eventually all edible plants will end up in the meat category, signifying food in general as meat. I go with that. The barbarism applied to animals will end – sooner than most people think. Oh how lazy the thought of gorging on flesh and blood when it’s brought straight to your plate.

Ever notice how humans make a lot of noise when eating animals before during after. Singing, dancing, jumping up and down to loud music, flailing the arms, driving the evil spirits from their table, asking blessings from God, offering it up even, saying thank you with bowed heads for the gifts.

So as not to be blamed by any animal-God, or devil-God seeking revenge, they always speak to the God that provided the feast not those who partook. It isn’t their fault, God allowed it. If God didn’t want us to have it then God would stop it.

Ha. Drinking the sweated blood diluted with alcohol to numb the mind of the atrocities, laughing overly loud, robustly spitting the power of evil onto the bloody flesh before swallowed as one consumes another soul. Ha, but the soul is already gone. Not to worry, we’ll numb the bastard next time and eat him alive. That ought to fulfill us just fine.

A plant is a plant and an animal is an animal. Currently meat means either animal or plant. Eventually, animals will no longer be considered food on this planet, so the term meat will refer to the main part and/or texture of whatever plant is under discussion.

Cows are animals, tomatoes are plants. When I develop a formula and a process using plants that replaces and replicates textures and flavors of chicken (which is currently cannibalized by humans for consumption) and I call it veggie chicken, that’s not the same as calling a plant an animal.

It’s an artistic sensory and pragmatic abstract, scientifically formulated to replace the cruelty of enslavement, torture and slaughter that has been imposed on special beings whose purpose on earth was misunderstood by the human animal.

The effort to civilize ourselves and each other is an ongoing evolution that must never take a step back to its ugly past.

Get out of the cave. There’s nothing to fear in the future if you recognize the rights of all beings once born to live out their natural lives on this planet.

Earth is a plan. It’s not a human. And it’s not a human plan, so stop taking credit for something you didn’t design.

Happy Holy Day to all beings!

~ Chef Davies-Tight










LOOKIN’ 4 UMAMI

A LESSON IN CREAMY

CREAM OF ASIAN PEAS 2

CREAMY ASIAN APRICOT SAUCE

Hey, I find it strange that so-called food scientists have isolated a taste sensation in soy sauce or shoyu called umami. I have yet to experience it. Maybe my buds are lacking those needed for that discernment. If not lacking, I can’t find anything, in my global-sensitive buds, resembling anything that I would interpret as a profound palatable experience upon consuming soy sauce. Swishing, gurgling, whistling, tried it all and I got nothing.

Until…I combined soy sauce with a creamy agent. The cream in the sauce screamed eureka! when the umami opened for the first time on my taste bud radar in the presence of soy sauce.

I’m wondering if it isn’t the dried fish or other animal additions to most Asian dishes that give those dishes an animal taste – but frankly wouldn’t it do the same with or without the soy sauce?

Tomato – also called a umami food, but usually found in the presence of cheese or other animal components.

Mushrooms? Same thing – always mixed with animal ingredients to enhance the animal flavor.

So for me it happened with a non-animal cream. Better now than never.

The most potent umami food on the planet barring animals – when you define umami as animal-like or enhancing the animal flavor and not simply savory (which by definition connotes an herbal necessity, which soy sauce lacks) is Kalamata olive and anything coming from it.

It is the meat. It is the lamb. It is anything you want it to be with the proper seasonings and additives.

Extra virgin olive oil is many times used by this chef as an animal alternative – no matter the dish presented. It has always been about the fat, or on a coarse piece of animal the gravy, which traditionally has been mostly fat.

If indeed soy sauce alone possesses all the necessary components to be called umami, then this cream sauce augments the umami sufficiently so that my umami-designated buds can discern it. Interestingly, soy has become one of the world’s foremost go-to foods for animal-replacement therapy.

So, in my view, umami-designated taste buds or combination of buds discern the animal taste, no matter the part of the animal. It is those buds that were meant to preserve all species from being eaten, so that when we discerned an animal on our bud-palate, we would instinctively spit it out. Over time as humans became accustomed to eating that which they were designed to reject, the body assimilated, adjusted, turned a blind eye to the existence of another being in its organism – not without its costs though.

Like the heroin addict’s body that adjusts to heroin to keep the body balanced, in the end the heroin which is supposed to be rejected – and always is initially – wins by destroying the human who indulges in it.

Cigarette smoke acts the same way. Initially our body rejects it, but we keep going back for more, till our body adjusts to it, causing symptoms of withdrawal when the cigarette smoke is blocked from entering the organism.  The same is so with alcohol. And coffee and other drugs and substances.

If you cook a mushroom just long enough, it will resemble in texture the mucous membrane, connective tissue, collagen, fat of the animal. A raw mushroom does nothing to excite that resemblance to an animal. Only when cooked does that happen.

Tomatoes. That’s a tough one. Looking for umami and the animal-like component. And maybe that’s it right there. It’s tough. Look at a whole dried tomato, open it, pull it apart, stretch it, yeah, I get the feel and the optics before it even reaches my mouth. The chew is there. Raw tomatoes don’t do that – not for me. Not yet.

Sesame? Sesame oil, not the seeds. Some seeds just texture too much like sand, but squeeze the oil out of them and it’s a whole new day.

One might think that these plant foods were predetermined to satisfy in the human and other animals the desire for eating each other. There had to be a genetically determined way to cause an animal to seek out certain foods, but also to block certain actions taken against other species vying for the same space on the planet. You can’t eat all of your enemies.

It’s all about umami and it’s all in the buds. Chew it and spit it out or chew it and swallow it.

If it can’t get past your nose it can’t get to your palate. There are lots of contradictions in nature that prove that * rule of thumb wrong: Limburger cheese, beer cheese, many cheeses, bread fruit, cooked crucifers, hard-boiled eggs, chitterlings, collard greens, caviar, sardines etc.

So why do we eat something our senses tell us to reject? Because we don’t trust our senses under all circumstances, because we see others do it, because we like breaking our own genetically determined rules for survival, because we like to tempt fate, because it feels good, even though the consequences are bad – but mostly bad long-term. It’s the short-term enjoyment, pleasure, adventure, risk-taking that exhilarates us. That’s how we read it > exhilaration, instead of fear. So there’s a trip-wire someplace that misguides us to think fun instead of fear.

* [RE: RULE OF THUMB reference. You could beat your wife with a stick no thicker than your thumb, but most people don’t make that connection any more. I didn’t. I had to look it up. I thought is was more like a measurement, thumb to eye, however that goes as your thumb moves further away, what does the artist see?]


Glutamate is the most prominent neurotransmitter in the human body/brain. An excess of glutamate has been linked to numerous neurological-based diseases and disorders. Glutamate is most prominently found in animals, but also exists in plant-life.

“Excitotoxicity (Wikipedia)

In humans, it is the main excitatory neurotransmitter, being present in over 50% of nervous tissue….

…Overstimulation of glutamate receptors causes neurodegeneration and neuronal damage through a process called excitotoxicity. Excessive glutamate, or excitotoxins acting on the same glutamate receptors, overactivate glutamate receptors (specifically NMDARs), causing high levels of calcium ions (Ca2+) to influx into the postsynaptic cell.

High Ca2+ concentrations activate a cascade of cell degradation processes involving proteases, lipases, nitric oxide synthase, and a number of enzymes that damage cell structures often to the point of cell death. Ingestion of or exposure to excitotoxins that act on glutamate receptors can induce excitotoxicity and cause toxic effects on the central nervous system. This becomes a problem for cells, as it feeds into a cycle of positive feedback cell death.

Glutamate excitotoxicity triggered by overstimulation of glutamate receptors also contributes to intracellular oxidative stress. Proximal glial cells use a cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) to transport cystine into the cell and glutamate out. Excessive extracellular glutamate concentrations reverse xCT, so glial cells no longer have enough cystine to synthesize glutathione (GSH), an antioxidant. Lack of GSH leads to more reactive oxygen species (ROSs) that damage and kill the glial cell, which then cannot reuptake and process extracellular glutamate. This is another positive feedback in glutamate excitotoxicity. In addition, increased Ca2+ concentrations activate nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the over-synthesis of nitric oxide(NO). High NO concentration damages mitochondria, leading to more energy depletion, and adds oxidative stress to the neuron as NO is a ROS.“…wikipedia

…Further, glutamate occupies a central position in amino acid metabolism in plants.”


Glutatamate is an amino acid associated with proteins – animal or plant.

In fact, the existence of glutamate in animals and plants is pervasive.

Since eating plants has not been associated with neurological diseases and disorders (NDAD), it might be wise to reduce the amount of glutamate ingested by reducing significantly or totally the amount of animal products ingested.

You can still have your umami and eat it too – only through plants, would be the correct survival advantage choice to make, not through animals.








 

Foreign Foods In Foreign Lands

I don’t like French food in France. I don’t like Russian food in Russia, I don’t like Hawaiian food in Hawaii. I don’t like Asian food in Hawaii. I don’t like Italian food in Italy. I don’t like German food in Germany. I don’t like Mexican food in Mexico. I don’t like English food in Britain. I don’t like Dutch food in Holland (the Netherlands). I don’t like Swiss food in Switzerland. I don’t like Belgian food in Belgium. I don’t like Austrian food in Austria. I don’t like Finnish food in Finland.

I don’t like street food anywhere.

I like everything À la Sharon. My way not your way. My taste buds not yours. In the style and manner of me. Using ingredients I like from everywhere that I want them from, combined and cooked the way I like to combine and cook them, not according to your culture or your dried up used up old never going to work for me method. I don’t give a rat’s ass about your culture and how you dismember an animal dead or alive passed down from generation to generation of serial offenders.

I don’t like your bread unless it’s made in an American bakery – the way I like bread to be made, the way I like bread to taste and texture. I don’t want you to pound the dough on a rock with filthy hands you scratched your ass and the snot from your nose with, then sell it to me as authentic.

The only thing I want authentic is me – not your greasy, slimy, dirty, grown in toilet water garbage that you call authentic foreign food.

I don’t like the animal in anything.

So all you foreigners who eat insects, keep them out of the foods you sell to me, unbeknownst to me, because you made a deal with somebody in the USA government giving you permission to use products I don’t want in my food. We’ll make the people adjust was the plan.

Not this old lady. I don’t adjust to slaughter and filth and allergic reactions to shell insects – yeah that’s right. Shell fish. Shell insects, beetles, whatever the name du jour happens to be in any given year. Keep your allergy producing foods in your own country, in your own pantry. I don’t want them.

It’s about moving forward – not moving backwards, where we all return to the jungle to scrape the dirt with sticks to gouge up worms for snacks. Whose global planning idea was that?

Fire their asses.






Not all animal-free dairy and animal-free meat foods are alike

Flavor, texture, color, aroma play a huge role in the products engineered to taste, look, feel and smell like something they’re not.

For me it’s all about the essence. I don’t want a food that tastes so much like a real cow, pig or chicken that I can’t tell the difference. Nobody likes to be fooled to that extent, and neither do I. However, if it isn’t pleasing to the senses, then what’s the point? It doesn’t help the animals for an animal consumer to eat an animal-free product, not like it and never try another, or to expect an animal consumer to try a non-animal product that hasn’t been developed to its full flavor, texture, color and aroma potential.

With animal-free meats particularly, there are other factors that come into play: How does it feel against the teeth, and against the actual flesh part of one’s own palate and tongue?

How do the salivary glands respond to the animal-free quality of the product that is supposed to serve as a substitute or alternative? And then, the after-taste. Some animal-free meats by themselves won’t win a prize, but combine them in a sandwich or other dish and the story changes for the better, much better!

I do not want to eat something that’s ‘not bad’. How many times have we heard people say those very words when tasting a vegetarian dish? They’ll chew, chew, stick out their lower lip to sniff and say, “not bad”. Although there are some really good products on the market today, when you get a bad one, you don’t forget it. And there are people out there who seemingly don’t have taste buds, who are in business to sell you something that actually turns your salivary glands dry.

I’ve been engineering vegetarian recipes since the early ’70′s without tofu or substitute flesh meat or dairy. I didn’t see the point of giving up meat, then eating a meat substitute. I don’t have to eat veggie-grain-soy based meats and dairy in order to be animal-free.

There’s nothing written in a rule book that demands that of me. I could go the rest of my life with no meat or dairy substitutes/alternatives and savor every meal without them. Why do I want sausage on my pizza, when I don’t eat meat?

However, once I wrapped my head around the animal-free sausage mimicking flavors and textures created by the cooking process and not particularly those of the suffering animal, I became more alert to the essence of the way people, for thousands of years, have been making dead animals taste via the cooking process to make them palatable. The same process can be used in the preparation of any plant-based food.

For example, most people don’t eat raw animals. At the very least, they hold it over an open flame to char it. Humans like that charred taste against the fat and fibers of the meat.

Well, you can do that with animal-free foods too. You just have to know how, when and with what foods to do it. After cooking with animal-free meats I discovered that it’s not as simple-minded as the box instructions lead one to believe. Thank goodness for that, since we’re not limited to a strict interpretation as to how to prepare them.

The vegan meats and dairy products I use and like, thus recommend, are at a level whereby any improvements made would be a bonus.

However, sometimes the improvements one wants to see in a product can be accomplished by the way the consumer prepares it. Frankly, I think most animal-free meat and dairy producers don’t know what can be done with their own animal-free products to make them taste and texture great. That’s where the cook comes in. A farmer can give you a slab of flesh, but it’s the cook who makes it taste good enough to eat.

For instance, some veggie meats have this annoying sweak-to-the-tooth quality as you chew them. When in a sandwich you don’t notice it, but if I’m making a veggie sausage tomato sauce, again, it’s annoying. What I’ve found is that if I let the cooked sauce with the veggie sausage in it sit overnight in the refrigerator, it disappears. It’s probably the acid from the tomatoes that does it. Not all brands do it. Maybe some people like the sweak; I don’t know.

As I said earlier in Chef’s Compass: “My goal is to make animal-free taste great. We use fresh, raw, canned, frozen, vacuum packed, dried and some processed foods. Although our simultaneous goal is good nutrition, we don’t eliminate salt, sugar and fats that would otherwise compromise the flavor and keep you from wanting more”.

Remember, your refrigerator-freezer is a pantry too! Keep it clean and neat!