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USDA

The onion salmonella outbreak grows. More recalls from Walmart, Kroger, Publix, H-E-B

TA-FC ClipBoard: This title is misleading: ONION SALMONELLA OUTBREAK WALMART, KROGER, PUBLIX, H-E-B. It makes one think onions in the produce department are being recalled, when in fact prepared foods using infected onions were recalled – all of them animal products. Usually recalls are made by the companies producing the food. Except for Taylor Farms and Amana Meat shop the rest of the items were made in-house. “Marketside” must be WalMart’s store brand, but who makes the product?

I often wondered who to call or hold responsible for an infected product when it’s the store brand. Who inspects these store brand companies? Where are they located? Do they really exist or are they actually large known companies that put somebody else’s label on their products at a reduced price?

The consumer deserves to know who makes the product that isn’t made in the grocery store, and how to track the product and who to contact regarding the product’s safety status. Store managers know nothing.

Making up a fictitious name and putting it on somebody else’s product from somebody else’s manufacturing plants needs to be outlawed. I can see nothing but trouble arising out of the “trust us” mentality that grocery stores are expecting their customers to buy into.

> Taylor Farms Cheddar Cheese & Chicken Salad Snack Tray

Sausage Breakfast Scramble Bowl sold at Walmart

  • If these are actually made onsite, where did the food prep people get the onions?

> .25-pound jar of Amana Meat Shop and Smokehouse Ham Water Added in Vinegar Pickle

Walmart Chicken Salad Deli Snack

  • Does Walmart chicken salad arrive at the deli already made or do they make it at the deli? The customers deserve to know.

> 41.35-ounce plastic bags containing bulk chicken salad, sold at Kroger

  • Where did the bulk chicken come from? The customer deserves to know.

> H-E-B Shake Rattle & Bowl Southwest Salad with Chicken

> Walmart’s “Marketside Southwest style Salad with Chicken

  • Does “MARKETSIDE” have an address, telephone number and email?

In this entire article I still don’t know where the onions came from or how they isolated the onion from all the other ingredients in the prepared food products. TELL US.

Who is Thomson International? Are the onions in all supermarkets infected, or only those onions that are contained in animal-based prepackaged products? Why don’t we know this? IS SOMEBODY TESTING ALL THE ONIONS FROM ALL THE FARMS?

Should I eat the onions in my refrigerator? Who investigated and wrote this article for Yahoo News? Why didn’t they ask questions? Not allowed to do that? Who owns and operates Yahoo? From the UK? If this is a Bakersfield, California story, why is it news in Miami, Florida? Bakersfield doesn’t have a press? Does Taylor Farms grow onions? Where are the onions grown? Are they grown on the same land where animals are raised for slaughter? Same fertilizer?

The public doesn’t need to know details, only to stop buying certain products from certain stores?? Wait just a minute. You’re talking about our health, and you’re telling us not to worry? What took so long? How many people were sick, but didn’t go to the doctor or hospital? Who is fudging the figures? They always do.

You can’t blame this on President Trump. Maybe because he wasn’t in the story it wasn’t considered newsworthy? Or maybe because white people weren’t killing black people with salmonella, it didn’t matter?

People need to be held accountable in a public way, not in secret. Yes, we do have a right to know. How about we all stop buying onions – forever? Do you like that?? Do we matter now? If the populace thinks their food supply is being tampered with there will be mayhem. Not over what happened in the 15th century, but over what’s happening right now.

Give us ALL the details.

THE OUTBREAK IS GROWING BECAUSE THE GOVERNMENT ISN’T STOPPING THE SALE OF ONIONS AND PRODUCTS CONTAINING ONIONS.

HOW DO WE KNOW WHICH ONIONS ARE SAFE? Most onions are sold in singles in produce departments.

Who stands to lose the most money?


ARTICLE:

The onion salmonella outbreak grows. More recalls from Walmart, Kroger, Publix, H-E-B

David J. Neal
 
 

The Salmonella Newport outbreak linked to onions has expanded into one of the largest in recent years, with 640 people sickened in 43 states, as of the most recent CDC update.

As the outbreak has expanded, so have the associated food recalls.

Food off the shelves

Once Bakersfield, California-based Thomson International initiated a 50-state recall of white, red, yellow and sweet yellow onions last week, the next wave of recalls would be of all the products that included those onions. That wave washed out products sold at Walmart, Kroger and Giant Eagle, all of which were recalled this week.

Also recalled were red onions packaged by Del Monte Fresh Produce and sold via bulk displays at Publix stores in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, and Virginia. The Lakeland-based chain says no Florida stores were involved in this recall of red onions shipped to Publix in July with product lookup number 4082.

The USDA put out a Public Health Alert about these onion-containing food products from Taylor Farms, the producer in the earlier Walmart and Kroger recalls. Consumers with any of the below products should return them to the store for a full refund.

▪ Sausage Breakfast Scramble Bowl sold at Walmart with lot Nos. TFD212AU8 and TFD213AU8.

Sausage Breakfast Scramble Bowl sold at Walmart
Sausage Breakfast Scramble Bowl sold at Walmart

▪ Kroger-sold Taylor Farms Cheddar Cheese & Chicken Salad Snack Tray with use by dates 08/06/20 or 08/07/20 and lot Nos. TFD212AU7 and TFD213AU7.

Taylor Farms Cheddar Cheese & Chicken Salad Snack Tray
Taylor Farms Cheddar Cheese & Chicken Salad Snack Tray

▪ 41.35-ounce plastic bags containing bulk chicken salad, sold at Kroger, with use by dates 08/04/20 or 08/05/20 and lot Nos. TFD212AU8 and TFD213AU8.

▪ Walmart-sold Chicken Salad Deli Snack with lot Nos. TFD212AU3 and TFD213AU3 and best by dates of 08/06/2020 or 08/07/2020.

Walmart Chicken Salad Deli Snack
Walmart Chicken Salad Deli Snack

▪ H-E-B Shake Rattle & Bowl Southwest Salad with Chicken, best by date of “Aug 10/2020” and lot No. TFD213AU20.

H-E-B Shake, Rattle & Bowl Southwest Salad with Chicken
H-E-B Shake, Rattle & Bowl Southwest Salad with Chicken

▪ Walmart’s “Marketside Southwest style Salad with Chicken, best by date of 08/11/20 or 08/12/2020 and lot Nos. TFD212AU26 or TFD213AU26.

Marketside Southwest Style Salad with Chicken
Marketside Southwest Style Salad with Chicken

The above products went to Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma, according to the USDA, although Walmart’s store list includes many more states. The jar of ham below went to stores in California, Illinois, South Carolina and Iowa and were available by mail order nationwide.

▪ 1.25-pound jar of Amana Meat Shop and Smokehouse Ham Water Added in Vinegar Pickle, lot Nos. E2620, F0320, F3720, F5420, G0620, G1720 and G3920.

The label from Amana Meat Shop & Smokehouse Ham in the USDA’s Public Health Alert
The label from Amana Meat Shop & Smokehouse Ham in the USDA’s Public Health Alert

The outbreak

The CDC’s state-by-state map says the only states without people sickened: Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Hawaii, Vermont and Rhode Island.

Predictably, considering Thomson International’s California home base, the states with the most ill sit in the Western United States region. Utah (90), Oregon (85), California (76) and Montana (52) account for 303 cases, 47.3 percent of the 640 cases total.

Of the 640 cases, 85 required hospitalization. Salmonella hits about 1.35 million Americans each year, hospitalizing about 26,500, usually with bloody diarrhea, and killing 420. For most people, it means four to seven days of diarrhea, stomachaches and fever.

Public health alert issued for two name brands, Walmart brand of taquitos

Recalled ground beef in GA, FL, Carolinas poses ‘high’ health risk, USDA says

Source: The onion salmonella outbreak grows. More recalls from Walmart, Kroger, Publix, H-E-B






Categories
USDA

Supermarkets stumble in notifying us of food recalls 

Los Angeles Times

February 18, 2020

I’m Business columnist David Lazarus, with a look today at food recalls — and whether consumers are receiving sufficient notice when contaminated goods make it onto supermarket shelves.

The U.S. Public Interest Research Group issued a report last week saying most large U.S. grocery stores come up short in notifying customers of products possibly tainted with salmonella, E. coli and other unwanted ingredients.

“Supermarkets should be our best recall notification system, but instead, we found that shoppers must go on a nearly impossible scavenger hunt to learn if they’ve purchased contaminated food,” said Adam Garber, a spokesman for U.S. PIRG’s Education Fund.

“Stores already use modern technology to track customers, place products and target us with ads,” he noted. “There’s no reason why they can’t also keep us healthy.”

The group checked out the country’s 26 largest supermarket chains. It gave a failing grade to 84% of them, including Albertsons, Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods and Walmart.

The biggest problem: Most stores failed to adequately notify customers about possibly hazardous products.

This is a big deal. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 6 Americans contract a foodborne illness every year, with 128,000 people hospitalized and 3,000 killed.

Only four of the chains reviewed by U.S. PIRG received a passing grade: Target, Kroger, Smith’s Food and Drug and Harris Teeter (and those latter two are owned by Kroger, which also owns Ralphs here in the Southland).

U.S. PIRG makes a handful of common-sense recommendations.

First, supermarkets should post recall information on their websites (duh).

Second, signs should be posted in stores — especially where affected products are sold — informing shoppers about food recalls. Such signs should be up at least two weeks for perishable goods and at least a month for frozen products.

Finally, supermarkets should use their loyalty programs to issue notices to customers within 48 hours of a recall being announced.

Stores might not be responsible for food recalls. But that doesn’t mean they should be passive bystanders.

Recalls

Medtronic recalled more than 322,000 insulin pumps because a missing or broken component can lead to over- or under-delivery of insulin. The problem was linked to one death, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Gourmet International recalled nearly 2,000 Butlers Irish Whiskey Dark Chocolate 3.5-ounce tablet bars because of high levels of milk not listed in the ingredients, posing a danger to people with allergies. The chocolate bars were sold in California and more than a dozen other states.






 

Categories
USDA

Family Traditions Meat Company Recalls Ready-to-Eat Meat Stick Products

TAFC Clipboard:  Recalling products due to misbranding and undeclared allergens happens too frequently.

I wonder what percentage of products get tested by the FSIS, or whatever department is responsible for the testing? It seems as though food companies are using the government as they’re double-check agency, rather than do it themselves.

If it’s a small percentage of product that actually gets tested or looked at by authorities, then the food companies benefit. It looks as though they purposely misbrand and fail to list allergens.

What are the odds that one’s products will get checked? Odds are they won’t. So the odds are in favor of the companies who misbrand or omit allergens on their labels.

How many harmful products slip by going undetected unless somebody complains? Way, way too many to give the consumers confidence in what they consume and the peace of mind they should expect and deserve. How many people get sick or die, with nobody knowing what caused it? Way, way too many.

  • They’re attitude? If the USDA wants us to do that, then let them check and we’ll absorb the recall costs, rather than spend money on doing it ourselves.

That attitude, proven by their noncompliance, makes it look like they’re not concerned about the consumer’s health. How could those in charge of knowing, not know what’s in the products they sell or if it matches what’s on the label?

Something needs to be done about this. Start fining them? Who gets the money? It should go directly to the consumers, but although it will be marked for the Department Of Agriculture, you can be sure it won’t end up there.

Aside: Just like Social Security with all those outstanding IOUs. Congress uses Social Security funds as their bottomless ATM. Hey, I’ve got an idea. Call in those IOUs then Social Security benefits won’t have to be cut.

Put it on congress. They agreed to the IOUs. Did they even vote on it? And why didn’t they tell the public, so they could respond? You know, so the public could debate it.

Now if the government doesn’t have the money to repay those IOUs, because it’s so massive, then take it out of the pockets of those who voted for it.

Congress steals from the most needy and vulnerable. That money they stole without asking or telling, until it was too late and too massive, belongs to the seniors in this country – not to ones breaching the border – requiring free-to-them-only healthcare and housing. Seniors need healthcare and housing too.


The USDA needs to find ways to force compliance without putting companies out of business. They’ve been negligent in not passing laws that protect the consumer. Instead they pass laws that protect the sellers who have little regard for the health and safety of the consumers of their products.

It’s not enough to say, the majority of products are safe. How do they even know? What that means to most people is that forty-nine percent of the products are not safe.

‘We don’t have the funds’, they claim. Then allocate the funds and take from the copious amounts of special interest monies and grants for frivolous projects and monies in the billions they throw at bankrupt and corrupt foreign countries with no promised returns on tax payers’ investments.

Our food, the air we breathe and the water we drink needs to be on the top of the A-list in every region on the planet. Yet, it isn’t, even though they all claim it is. They’ll say, they eat, breathe and drink the same food, air and water as everybody else.

So that’s where we are right now, because the politicians and lawmakers don’t care what they eat, breathe and drink. You can’t even count on the scientists, since they serve at the pleasure of government and big business who decide what’s harmful and/or beneficial based on financial benefits to the wealthy.

Just the fact that the government promotes certain products from countries with which they make trade deals, when the populace doesn’t want to consume their products is proof enough that government and big business do not have the interest of the consumer as their primary concern.


Family Traditions Meat Company Recalls Ready-to-Eat Meat Stick Products Due to Misbranding and an Undeclared Allergen

Class I Recall006-2020
Health Risk: HighFeb 8, 2020

Congressional and Public Affairs
Maria Machuca
(202) 720-9113
FSISpress@usda.gov

WASHINGTON, Feb. 8, 2020 – Family Traditions Meat Company, an Ackley, Iowa establishment, is recalling approximately 270 pounds of ready-to-eat (RTE) beef stick products due to misbranding and an undeclared allergen, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The product contains milk, a known allergen, which is not declared on the product label.

The fully cooked, ready-to-eat beef stick items were produced on Nov. 14, 2019, Dec. 3, 2019 and Jan. 6, 2020 and have a shelf life of six months. The following product is subject to recall:  [View Labels (PDF Only)]

  • 3-oz. and 6-oz. vacuum-packed packages containing “Arcadia MEATS SMOKED BEEF STICKS ORIGINAL” with lot numbers 31819, 33719 and 00620.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 46538” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

The problem was discovered by a compliance officer with the Iowa Department of Agriculture during in-commerce surveillance activities at a retail store.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers or both. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify that recalling firms are notifying their customers of the recall and that actions are being taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers and members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Jolene Heikens, Vice President of Sales with Family Traditions Meat Company, or Ashley Morton, Hazard Coordinator with Family Traditions Meat Company, at (641) 847-8116.

Consumers with food safety questions can call the toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or live chat via Ask USDA from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Consumers can also browse food safety messages at Ask USDA or send a question via email to  MPHotline@usda.gov. For consumers that need to report a problem with a meat, poultry, or egg product, the online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at https://foodcomplaint.fsis.usda.gov/eCCF/.

Source: Family Traditions Meat Company Recalls Ready-to-Eat Meat Stick Products Due to Misbranding and an Undeclared Allergen






Categories
NET NEWS USDA

FSIS Issues Public Health Alert for Swedish Meatball Products Due to Misbranding and an Undeclared Allergen

CNAP ClipBoard: RE: “A recall was not requested because it is believed that the products are no longer available for consumers to purchase.”

  • A recall still should have been executed, so that those who still have the product stored in their pantries or stores can return it without incident. Many smaller markets purchase from other stores and then just raise the price for convenience purposes, rather than buying wholesale, so they don’t have to buy by the case.
  • Everyone who purchased the product, which could still be in play in some regions, must be considered when making general sweeping decisions, based on statistical probability rather than reality. Some people always get left out. No one, absent a recall, is going to know about this. Consumers don’t get updates from the USDA…I do, but I’m rare.
  • Now, if somebody gets sick and you didn’t recall the product, that makes the DOA, USDA and FSIS legally responsible.
  • One must begin to question why there are so maybe mislabeling mistakes on our food products. Who is doing the labeling? And why isn’t the labeling double checked? These labels need to be checked before they get to the USDA – at the manufacturing level. It seems like these companies are sidestepping their own verification process and making the USDA do it for them, hoping to slide by, to save themselves money. This is not acceptable.
  • Does that mean we really don’t know what goes into our food? And why not? Because people who don’t share our standards do whatever they want or whatever is cheapest for them? Many people won’t be comfortable going forward into this decade knowing people who don’t share our health and sanitation concerns are the ones feeding us. Scary.
  • Carso’s Pasta Company: I looked them up. It looks like they make pasta and sell all types of meats and cheeses in their pasta products. It looks like a small operation. How could they make such a mistake?
  • On further inspection, they don’t even have Swedish Meatballs in Sauce on their website menu of products they sell. In fact, there is no mention of the mislabeled product to alert customers who have already purchased it. Why is that? And who looks at websites after a product is purchased?
  • This is a small family-owned company. What happens in large companies halfway across the world, whose products end up in our pantries? Scary.
  • A recall is always needed when the product is still in play. That way it gets to the attention of news outlets, who will at least get the alerts out locally and/or nationally if products are shipped nationally.
  • It looks like the public isn’t being given the right information.
  • It’s a good idea for all media cable and network news outlets to have a ticker tape of recalled food products on 24/7. The public often times is unaware till it’s too late and too many people got sick and/or died. It’s time to protect the consumer and stop finding loopholes for the offenders.
  • How many people died because of bad product? There is no reliable figure, because other causes are always cited – to protect the offending parties from lawsuits. The government bends over backwards to provide this protection. What are we the Mafia? Yes.
Categories
NET NEWS USDA

FDA criticized for waiting 6 weeks to announce latest romaine lettuce E. coli outbreak

Romaine or cos lettuce is a variety of popular lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. longifolia)

CNAP ClipBoard: The problem with not announcing it because the lettuce was already past its shelf date and not available for sale, is that most grocers sell produce beyond its shelf date. When it’s too rotted to do that, then they put it in a greatly reduced price section of the produce for poor people to buy.


FDA criticized for waiting 6 weeks to announce latest romaine lettuce E. coli outbreak

Credit: Max Pixel

AUTHOR

Cathy Siegner

PUBLISHED

Nov. 5, 2019

Dive Brief:

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Oct. 31 an E. coli outbreak associated with romaine lettuce sickened 23 people in 12 states between July 12 and Sept. 8. While 11 people were hospitalized, the agency said no deaths were reported, the active investigation has wrapped up and the outbreak appears to be over.

Romaine lettuce was identified as the likely source, but available data indicated the product eaten by sick people was past its shelf life and no longer available for sale, the FDA said. “We do not believe there is a current or ongoing risk to the public and we are not recommending the public avoid consuming romaine lettuce,” Frank Yiannas, FDA’s deputy commissioner for Food Policy and Response, said in the release.

Both the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention established romaine as the probable cause on Oct. 2, Brian Katzowitz, a CDC health communication specialist, told The Washington Post. He said the delay in sharing the news was due to a few variables and the CDC “generally posts outbreak warnings when there is something actionable for consumers to do.”

Dive Insight:

It’s not uncommon for food safety regulators to wait until more details are known about an outbreak before informing the public, but for six weeks to go by before saying anything about an E. coli outbreak can raise questions and cause consumer concern. The delay is even more puzzling since this outbreak was linked to romaine lettuce, which has been involved in three other major outbreaks during the past two years.

The FDA and the CDC may believe consumers couldn’t realistically do anything to protect themselves six weeks out, but telling people about the outbreak earlier may have helped them avoid contaminated romaine lettuce. The FDA’s assertion that any contaminated romaine lettuce would be past its shelf life and no longer available for sale may be true, but it’s not clear how the agency could know that for a fact.

Food safety activists have criticized the delay. Food safety lawyer Bill Marler wrote on his blog that he was disgusted that the government kept this outbreak “hidden from public view.”

“Although the consuming public was kept in the dark, it is without question that government, industry and academia knew that the outbreak happened, but they all chose to hide it until late this evening – so much for ‘transparency’ and so much for ‘food safety culture,’ ” he wrote. “We will not have a safe food supply when facts are hidden from consumers.”

Consumer Reports was also critical of the delay, writing in a post that while not all foodborne illness outbreaks are publicly announced, previous lettuce-related outbreaks were severe enough to warrant quicker action. The nonprofit also noted E. coli O157:H7 — the strain of the pathogen involved — produces a toxin that can lead to serious illness, kidney failure and death.

The leafy greens industry is well aware of pathogen problems and has recently taken steps to improve production processes. The industry has tightened up grower requirements and recently embarked on a multi-year food safety initiative involving government, academia and industry to better understand the impact of pathogens on leafy greens in areas including Yuma County, Arizona and the Imperial Valley in California.

In a statement, the California Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement trade group said it will use information from this latest outbreak investigation to enhance mandatory food safety practices. LGMA Chairman Dan Sutton said while FDA’s farm tests were negative for traces of E. coli, leafy greens growers will continue to work with public health agencies to improve their food safety practices.

According to a 2017 report from the Interagency Food Safety Analytics Collaboration, 51% of E. coli cases were linked to produce in 2013, along with 59% of listeria cases, 46% of salmonella ones and 33% of cambylobacter cases. Most E. coli outbreaks were linked to leafy greens and other vegetables — more than any other food category.

Waiting six weeks to reveal the E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce could have been an effort to reduce panic, but that decision could lead to more consumers losing trust in the industry.

Transparency is critical to bolstering consumer confidence in the food supply — particularly items that have already had contamination problems.

In addition, any delay telling the public about an outbreak will likely increase suspicion that food safety agencies are not looking out for the public welfare, and that sentiment could lead to less romaine lettuce being consumed. The romaine industry, which was hit by decreased sales following…

READ ON:

    FDA criticized for waiting 6 weeks to announce latest romaine lettuce E. coli outbreak | Food Dive






Categories
USDA

Rastelli Bros., Inc. Recalls Meat Products due to Possible Foreign Matter Contamination

News Release

Rastelli Bros., Inc. Recalls Meat Products due to Possible Foreign Matter Contamination

Class II Recall

109-2019

Health Risk: Low

Nov 7, 2019

Congressional and Public Affairs

Veronika Pfaeffle

(202) 720-9113

FSISpress@usda.gov

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7, 2019 – Rastelli Bros., Inc., doing business as Rastelli Foods Group, a Swedesboro, N.J. establishment, is recalling approximately 130,464 pounds of raw ground beef products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically plastic, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The raw ground beef items were produced from Oct. 3, 2019 through Oct. 15, 2019. The following products are subject to recall:  16-oz vacuum sealed packages containing “NATURE’S RANCHER 100% GRASS FED ORGANIC GROUND BEEF 85% LEAN, 15% FAT” with case code 9276, 9283, 9287, or 9288 and use or freeze by dates of 10/24/19, 10/31/19, 11/04/19, 11/07/19, and 11/11/19.

16-oz vacuum sealed packages containing “NATURE’S RANCHER 100% GRASS FED ORGANIC GROUND BEEF 93% LEAN, 7% FAT” with case code 9276, 9283, 9287, or 9288 and use or freeze by dates of 10/24/19, 10/31/19, 11/04/19, 11/07/19, and 11/11/19.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 7877-A” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to distribution centers and further sent to retail locations in Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, and Maryland.

The problem was discovered after FSIS received consumer complaints through the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline. The firm also notified FSIS that they received a consumer complaint directly.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.  FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Mike Kelly, vice president of sales at Rastelli, at (856) 803-1100. Members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Raymond Rastelli, Jr., president and owner of Rastelli, at (856) 803-1100.

Consumers with food safety questions can call the toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or live chat via Ask USDA from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Consumers can also browse food safety messages at Ask USDA or send a question via email to MPHotline@usda.gov.

For consumers that need to report a problem with a meat, poultry, or egg product, the online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at https://foodcomplaint.fsis.usda.gov/eCCF/.

Source: Rastelli Bros., Inc. Recalls Meat Products due to Possible Foreign Matter Contamination






Categories
USDA

Padrino Foods, LLC Recalls Beef Tamales Products due to Mislabeling

News Release

Padrino Foods, LLC Recalls Beef Tamales Products due to Mislabeling

Class II Recall

107-2019

Health Risk: Low

Nov 4, 2019

Congressional and Public Affairs

Veronika Pfaeffle

(202) 720-9113FSIS

press@usda.gov 

WASHINGTON, Nov. 4, 2019 – Padrino Foods, LLC, an Irving, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 1,931 pounds of beef tamales because the products may be misbranded, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The products are labeled as beef and sirloin tamales but contain pork product inside the package.

The fully cooked, not shelf stable beef tamales items were produced on May 8, 2019. The following products are subject to recall: 60-oz. packages containing “padrino foods BEEF & SIRLOIN TAMALES Homestyle in corn husks” with lot code 2128903 and a sell-by date 12-27-19.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 13136” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were sold at retail locations in Kansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas.  The problem was discovered by a customer who notified the firm of the misbranding error. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.  Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify that recalling firms are notifying their customers of the recall and that actions are being taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Diane Luther, owner of Padrino Foods, LLC, at (214) 905-3444. Members of the media with questions about the recall can contact David Luther, Padrino Foods, LLC CEO, at (214) 905-3444.

Consumers with food safety questions can call the toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or live chat via Ask USDA from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Consumers can also browse food safety messages at Ask USDA or send a question via email to AskUSDA@usda.gov. For consumers that need to report a problem with a meat, poultry, or egg product, the online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at https://foodcomplaint.fsis.usda.gov/eCCF/.

Source: Padrino Foods, LLC Recalls Beef Tamales Products due to Mislabeling






Categories
USDA

24,000 Pounds Of Raw Beef Have Been Recalled After Being Deemed “Unfit For Human Consumption”

24,000 Pounds Of Raw Beef Have Been Recalled After Being Deemed “Unfit For Human Consumption” Samantha Holender

From Delish

Summer is over and more than 24,000 pounds of raw beef products have been recalled. Happy day? I think not.

The American Beef Packers, a California based company, recently notified the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service that a carcass accidentally got thrown into the mix of raw beef products during packaging. As a result, the affected beef is not recommended for human consumption.

The tainted beef was packed on August 21 and recalled products are stamped with “EST. 34741” in the USDA signage on the packaging.The bad beef was primarily sent to California and Oregon, so if you reside in either of those states, you might want to reconsider that end-of-season BBQ. Save yourself and your guests from a less-than-stellar summer wrap-up and take the damaged goods back to the store or just toss them out. FYI, most of the products affected are of the ribeye, sirloin, and boneless beef variety.

Thankfully, we haven’t heard any reports of illness or hospitalization. But if you think you may have taken a bite of the recalled meat and are feeling a little woozy, please call your doctor for professional advice. Do a sweep of your freezer to make sure you didn’t stow away any recent meat purchases as well.

See below for a list of the recalled items from the USDA and shop safe.

Bulk pack combo bins containing “AMERICAN BEEF PACKERS 85 BONELESS BEEF CHUCKS” with LOT NO.110 and BIN No. 85 and BIN No. 86.

Bulk pack combo bins containing “AMERICAN BEEF PACKERS 90 BONELESS BEEF” with LOT NO. 110 and BIN No. 81, BIN No. 82 and BIN No. 83.

Bulk pack combo bins containing “AMERICAN BEEF PACKERS 85 BONELESS BEEF” with LOT NO. 25-110 and BIN No. 84 and LOT NO 110 and BIN No. 88.Cases containing “AMERICAN BEEF PACKERS RIBEYE 8/10 #1” with codes BT190821-1178, BT190821-1185, BT190821-1188,

BT190821-1190, and BT190821-1194.66.2-lb. case containing “AMERICAN BEEF PACKERS RIBEYE 10 UP #1” with code BT190821-1186.

Bulk pack combo bin containing “AMERICAN BEEF PACKERS 90 BONELESS BEEF SIRLOINS” with LOT NO. 24-110 and BIN No. 80.

Source: 24,000 Pounds Of Raw Beef Have Been Recalled After Being Deemed “Unfit For Human Consumption”






Categories
USDA

Over 700 pounds of raw beef and pork products recalled due to possible blood contamination

HWH COMMENT: US FOODS. Yeah, they deliver to many local restaurants within a mile radius of me. I see them a lot while walking to do my errands. Guess I better not eat out for a while.

Even though I don’t eat this stuff, it gets cooked and served in the restaurants I do eat at.

Nobody says whether cross contamination can occur, so I’m assuming it can. How many restaurants will even see this recall? People are too busy. They’re not on the internet all day and night.

The USDA should have an alert app that businesses can put on the restaurant computers that they use while working.

Frankly, I don’t believe that a finger cut caused a High Risk Class I situation. And I don’t believe that it’s restricted to the states they name.

I’m not going to take any chances. I’m staying away from all restaurants.


News Release

Class I Recall076-2019
Health Risk: High
Jul 20, 2019

Congressional and Public Affairs
Meredith Carothers
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

WASHINGTON, July 20, 2019 – US Foods, a Birmingham, AL, establishment, is recalling approximately 712 pounds of raw beef and pork products that may be adulterated due to possible product contamination, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The fresh and frozen raw beef and pork items were produced July 18, 2019. This spreadsheet contains a list of the products subject to recall. [View labels (PDF only)]

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 21103” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to restaurants in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee.

The problem was discovered after the facility learned that an employee may have cut himself during production.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in restaurant refrigerators or freezers. Restaurants who have purchased these products are urged not to serve them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution lists will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers and members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Sara Matheu, Director of Media Relations, US Foods, at (847) 720-2392.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.







Categories
USDA

123 tons of breakfast foods may contain rocks

246,000 pounds of frozen breakfast wraps recalled as they may contain small rocks

Tanya Edwards,Yahoo Lifestyle

El Monterey brand frozen breakfast wraps are being recalled to the tune of more than 246,000 pounds. The wraps, which are sold nationwide, are being recalled over fears the bacon may be contaminated with extraneous materials, including small rocks.

How do rocks get into bacon, and thus breakfast wraps? It’s not really clear. What does seem clear is that someone ate rocks and complained.

The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) states that, “The problem was discovered on June 14, 2019, when Ruiz Foods advised FSIS of three consumer complaints regarding foreign material in the wrap products. The firm continues to investigate the source of the foreign material.”

Ruiz Foods apparently received a report of a potential injury and alerted the FSIS immediately, triggering the recall. The FSIS has received no additional reports of injury or illness from consumption of these products. They stress to see a doctor if you’re concerned you’ve consumed a contaminated product.

Worried you might have some of the contaminated product in your freezer? According to FSIS, you’ll want to check your freezer for 8-Pack family size film packages containing “EL MONTEREY EGG, POTATO, BACON & CHEESE SAUCE BREAKFAST WRAPS” with “Best if Used By” dates of 01/17/2020 and 01/18/2020 and lot codes 19017 and 19018.

Source: 123 tons of breakfast foods may contain rocks