Häagen-Dazs Releases 4 New Vegan Ice Cream Bars and Pints

HÄAGEN-DAZS RELEASES 4 NEW VEGAN ICE CREAM BARS AND PINTS

Editorial Assistant, LIVEKINDLY | New York City | Contactable via: kat@livekindly.co

Posted by Kat Smith | Apr 4, 2018

Popular ice cream brand Häagen-Dazs has just expanded its line of vegan ice cream products to include four new desserts: chocolate-covered vegan ice cream bars and dairy-free pints that feature cookie crumbles.

The new pint options are Crunchy Peanut Butter and Coconut Cookies and Crème, both of which are part of the Trio Crispy Layers collection. Both flavors feature the company’s non-dairy ice cream base layered with crispy cookie crumble pieces. And for the first time ever, Häagen-Dazs will offer vegan versions of its signature chocolate-covered ice cream bars in Peanut Butter Chocolate Fudge and Coconut Caramel Dark Chocolate.

“We start every non-dairy dessert from core ingredients like rich peanut butter, velvet coconut cream, or real pieces of chocolate to create a creamier, more authentic experience,” the company stated.

Last summer, Häagen-Dazs released its first four vegan ice cream flavors: Peanut Butter Chocolate Fudge, Coconut Caramel, Chocolate Salted Fudge Truffle, and Mocha Chocolate Cookie. To start, the flavors were available only at Target, but earlier this year, the brand expanded distribution to include grocery stores across the nation…

FINISH READING: Häagen-Dazs Releases 4 New Vegan Ice Cream Bars and Pints






 

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A vaccine for edible plants? 

A vaccine for edible plants? A new plant protection method on the horizon

Date: April 5, 2018

Source: University of Helsinki

Summary: Novel technologies are being sought to replace the traditional pesticides used to protect plants, particularly edible plants such as cereals. A new project is shedding light on the efficacy of environmentally friendly RNA-based vaccines that protect plants from diseases and pests.

Novel technologies are being sought to replace the traditional pesticides used to protect plants, particularly edible plants such as cereals. A new collaborative project between the University of Helsinki and the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) is shedding light on the efficacy of environmentally friendly RNA-based vaccines that protect plants from diseases and pests.

Plant diseases and pests cause considerable crop losses and threaten global food security. The diseases and pests have traditionally been fought with chemical pesticides, which spread throughout our environment and may be hazardous to human health, beneficial organisms and the environment.

“A new approach to plant protection involves vaccinating plants against pathogens with double-stranded RNA molecules that can be sprayed directly on the leaves,” explains Dr Minna Poranen of the Molecular and Integrative Biosciences Research Programme at the University of Helsinki’s Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences.The vaccine triggers a mechanism known as RNA interference, which is an innate defence mechanism of plants, animals and other eukaryotic organisms against pathogens. The vaccine can be targeted to the chosen pathogen by using RNA molecules which share sequence identity with the pest’s genes and prevents their expression…

Finish Reading: A vaccine for edible plants? A new plant protection method on the horizon — ScienceDaily






 

Where’s the beef? For Impossible Foods it’s in boosting burger sales and raising hundreds of millions

Where’s the beef?

For Impossible Foods it’s in boosting burger sales and raising hundreds of millions

Jonathan Shieber,TechCrunch Tue, Apr 3 5:38 PM EDT

Any company that’s looking to replace the more than 5 billion pounds of ground beef making its way onto tables in the U.S. every year with a meatless substitute is going to need a lot of cash.

It’s a big vision with lots of implications for the world — from climate change and human health to challenging the massive, multi-billion dollar industries that depend on meat — and luckily for Impossible Foods (one of the many companies looking to supplant the meat business globally), the company has managed to attract big-name investors with incredibly deep pockets to fund its meatless mission.

In the seven years since the company raised its first $7 million investment from Khosla Ventures, Impossible Foods has managed to amass another $389 million in financing — most recently in the form of a convertible note from the Singaporean global investment powerhouse Temasek (which is backed by the Singaporean government) and the Chinese investment fund Sailing Capital (a state-owned investment fund backed by the Communist Party-owned Chinese financial services firm, Shanghai International Group).

“Part of the reason why we did this as a convertible note is that we knew we would increase our valuation with the launch of our business,” says David Lee, Impossible Foods chief operating officer. “We closed $114 million in the last 18 months.” The company raised its last equity round of $108 million in September 2015.

Lee declined to comment on the company’s path to profitability, valuation or revenues.

Impossible began selling its meat substitute back in 2016 with a series of launches at some of America’s fanciest restaurants in conjunction with the country’s most celebrated young chefs.David Chang (of Momofuku fame in New York) and Traci Des Jardins of Jardiniére and Chris Cosentino of Cockscomb signed on in San Francisco, as well as Tal Ronnen of Crossroads in Los Angeles.”When we launched a year ago, we were producing out of a pilot facility,” says Impossible co-founder Pat Brown. [Now] we have a full-fledged production facility producing 2.5 million pounds per month at the end of the year.”

The new facility, which opened in Oakland last year, has its work cut out for it. Impossible has plans to expand to Asia this year and is now selling its meat in more than 1,000 restaurants around the U.S.Some would argue that the meat substitute has found its legs in the fast-casual restaurant chains that now dot the country, serving up mass-marketed, higher price point gourmet burgers. Restaurants including FatBurger, Umami Burger, Hopdoddy, The Counter, Gott’s and B Spot — the Midwest burger restaurant owned by Chef Michael Symon — all hawk Impossible’s meat substitute in an increasing array of combinations.

“When we started looking at what Pat and the team at Impossible was doing we saw a perfect fit with the values and mission that Impossible has to drive a stronger mindset around what it is to be conscientious about what is going on,” says Umami Burger chief executive Daniel del Olmo.Since launching their first burger collaboration last year, Umami Burger has sold more than 200,000 Impossible Burgers. “Once people tried the burger they couldn’t believe that it was not meat,” says del Olmo. “They immediately understood that it was a product that they could crave. We are seeing 38 percent increase in traffic leading to 18 percent sales growth [since selling the burger].

“At $13 a pop, the Impossible Umami Burger is impossible for most American families to afford, but pursuing the higher end of the market was always the initial goal for Impossible’s founder, Patrick Brown.

A former Stanford University professor and a serial entrepreneur in the organic food space (try his non-dairy yogurts and cheeses!), Brown is taking the same path that Elon Musk used to bring electric vehicles to the market. If higher-end customers with discerning palates can buy into meatless burgers that taste like burgers, then the spending can subsidize growth (along with a few hundred million from investors) to create economics that will become more favorable as the company scales up to sell its goods at a lower price point.

Brown recognizes that 2.5 million pounds of meat substitute is no match for a 5 billion-pound ground-beef juggernaut, but it is, undeniably, a start. And as long as the company can boost sales for the companies selling its patties, the future looks pretty bright. “To get to scale you have to sell to a higher price-point,” says Brown.That approach was the opposite tack from Beyond Meat, perhaps the only other well-funded competitor for the meatless crown. Beyond Meat is selling through grocery stores like Whole Foods, in addition to partnerships of its…

FINISH READING: Where’s the beef? For Impossible Foods it’s in boosting burger sales and raising hundreds of millions







 

Steve’s Perfect Broth Sauce

STEVE'S MUSHROOM WINE SAUCE 2

STEVE’S PERFECT BROTH SAUCE

Steve likes to use ingredients I call dodads – gourmet type items he finds at the market – stuff that’s fun to buy, unique stuff like garlic in a tube, herb paste in a tube etc. I’ll tell ya, he had an uncanny sense of what goes with what, since this sauce, more like a rich broth with solids, turned my head for sure! I ran to get my pad and pen to write down the ingredients while still fresh in his mind – this is it, one of the finest broth-type sauces I’ve ever tasted!

Makes 7-1/2 cups

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Vegan Ham And Bean Stroganoff – may wah brand ham

VEGAN HAM AND BEAN STROGANOFF

There’s nothing ordinary about these soupy beans. I seem to recall something about “let’s rock and roll some taste buds”. So let’s do it. There’s no liquor in here, but there could be. Go ahead juice it up – bourbon, wine, rum, beer? Experiment. Pineapple, cabbage, mini peppers and vegan ham make this stroganoff extra special! Sweet spicy savory! Serve over fettucini!

Makes 11-1/2 cups

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AFC Vegan Ham And Egg Macaroni Salad – using May Wah vegan ham

AFC VEGAN HAM AND EGG MACARONI SALAD

You can’t get much better than this. Lots of new techniques applied to an old-time favorite salad. Macaroni has a new place in the heirarchy of pasta salads. You don’t even need the dressing, in fact some of you will want to forego it. Or, half with dressing, half without. Either way it made it to the moon and back! 

Makes 14 cups solids and almost 2 cups dressing

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AFC Macaroni Salad Sauce

AFC MACARONI SALAD SAUCE

Vegan sour cream has about half the calories of vegan mayonnaise, and it’s thicker, so you can add more to it without watering it down too much. For that reason, at least in some salads, vegan sour cream has become my new ‘go to’ base for mayonnaise replacement!

Makes approx. 2 cups

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This ‘beer’ will get you high, not drunk

This ‘beer’ will get you high, not drunk

Kerry Justich,Yahoo Lifestyle Thu, Mar 29 1:33 PM EDT

The brewer behind Blue Moon beer is creating a beverage with THC.

The man who became a disruptor in the beer industry back in 1995 has come up with a new concept of the beverage — by integrating the psychedelic component of cannabis. Alongside his wife Jodi, Keith Villa is now establishing himself as one of the first to create a marijuana-infused beverage that actually contains THC, the cannabis chemical that produces a buzz. And if it sounds enticing yet nerve-racking for those who haven’t experienced a marijuana high before, there will be three levels of the brew to try out.

The man behind Blue Moon beer is now creating a beverage that will give you a high. After developing and overseeing the Blue Moon Belgian White brand under Coors Brewing for 23 years, and working with MillerCoors for more than three decades, Villa was ready for something new. Similar to his idea of bringing a Belgian beer to the States, his new venture is all about pushing the boundaries in terms of what beverages people might not yet know they want.

For a country where marijuana is still federally illegal, a drink that gets you high certainly falls under that category.

Ceria Beverages and its THC-infused “beer” is coming soon. “It really is a step back in time to just after Prohibition,” he told Forbes. “Back in 1933 you had a stigma with alcohol. After so many years of being illegal it took years to get over that. But once that goes away for cannabis, it will be a huge part of our economy.”…

FINISH READING: This ‘beer’ will get you high, not drunk






 

Over-The-Top Macaroni Salad – delight soy and hellman’s

OVER-THE-TOP MACARONI SALAD

Tired of the same old macaroni salad? Want to perk it up? Well, you came to the right person. Contains no animal products and who would know? Using products developed by Delight Soy and Hellman’s Mayonnaise who care about your animal-free experience we swung for the fences and went clear over the top into the next county! Take a look and see what you think!

We couldn’t make this salad with chicken-like plant meat and egg-like dressing alone, so a tip of the hat to all the manufacturers and farmers who contributed to the success of this dish!

Makes 13 cups

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Split Pea And Vegan Ham Soup – May Wah

SPLIT PEA AND VEGAN HAM SOUP

Green cabbage, vegan ham, vegan yeast, light-flavored sesame oil, liquid smoke, Balsamic vinegar and whole cooked frozen peas are the differential ingredients that take an ordinary pea soup to new culinary heights! give it a try!

Makes 27 cups

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AFC Eggs Benedictine – May Wah inspired

FIRST WE MAKE THE POACHED EGG SAUCE:

AFC POACHED EGG SAUCE ©

Okay, so what’s this now? The AFC POACHED EGG SAUCE! Okay it doesn’t look exactly like a poached egg that you put on toast. YET, cut up a chicken poached egg and mix it on itself, and preTTy close. The flavors and textures are there. It’s the best yet. Plus, no sulfur. I’m going with it. S-O-A-R-ing with it! Wow. Thank you God!

Makes 3-2/3 cups

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AFC Mushroom Bolognese Sauce ©

AFC MUSHROOM BOLOGNESE SAUCE ©

One of Steve’s favorite sauces was a bolognese sauce, essentially meat sauce with tomatoes, garlic and a bunch of other stuff. Both our mothers made it, but didn’t call it that. Spaghetti sauce they called it. All spaghetti sauce back then had meat in it. Times change, but sometimes we still like to go back to our childhood favorites, while now absent the cruelty. Red rice is our go to meat for tomato sauces now. Give it a try. See for yourself!

Makes 10-1/2 cups

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POWWOW THIS

Just because there’s no science to support a particular claim, doesn’t mean the claim is not true or accurate.

‘No science to back it up’ many times connotes a hidden agenda to maintain the status quo by advertently keeping the science out, which in turn becomes beneficial to a particular ideology, group or individual or business.

Agendas are rampant in the scientific community – hidden or not. Look how long it took for the scientific community to finally connect cigarette smoking with lung disease, particularly cancer? The USA still does not ban the manufacture and sale of cigarettes, even though they are deemed poisonous to the body.

The Insurance Industry powwowed with the Tobacco Industry and then they both powwowed with Congress to make a deal whereby all sides benefitted, except the smoker, except anybody who ever smoked even one cigarette, except anybody who was ever in the same room with anybody else who smoked a cigarette.

If it’s a killer ban it. If it costs billions of dollars a year for health services, lost wages, lost families ban it. If it’s that bad, and all now agree that it is, then stop manufacturing cigarettes. If nicotine has a medical benefit, then find a different delivery system than an inhalant.

Why are nicotine patches so expensive? Why is nicotine-laced gum so expensive? Don’t these industries have enough money? Can’t they come up with a more creative way – like the marijuana industry did – to deliver their drug without having to inhale it?

Because the tobacco industry wants to grow tobacco. It’s the tar that destroys the tissues. They know it, that’s why they invented electronic cigarettes, but there are too many glitches and people still go back to the smoke, because it’s still sold everywhere.

Oh, and they export cigarettes to other countries, wanting to addict them and make them keep wanting that which makes them sick, so they can keep profiting from their tobacco fields. Of course if they sell it abroad they have to sell it here. They don’t want to look like hypocrites.

I’m seeing too many circles here.

You can’t keep having it all ways, every way, your way. Let tobacco go the way of the dinosaur. Extinct it. If a person wants to grow tobacco in their own yard, then okay, let them do it their way. It’s a plant. They can shove it up their noses if they want to, but Not For Sale. Not to make profit from another person’s harmful-to-the-body addiction.

The Insurance Industry needs to stop punishing smokers when they’re the ones who made a deal with the Tobacco Industry that keeps them in business. Congress bought into all of it. Take the blame away from Tobacco, Insurance and Congress. Keep tobacco growing in the fields, keep manufacturing cigarettes, keep the poor slobs addicted, raise their premium rates and punish them financially forever – even if they smoked even one cigarette their entire life, because the Insurance Industry found the science that supposedly proved that one cigarette could cause cancer – even if you smoked it fifty years ago. So they can deny you benefits based on their science.

You smoke at your own peril. After they addicted you, they drop you flat. No one gets punished except the smoker or quitter or those exposed to second-hand smoke.

What’s the first thing that shows up on your medical record under your name? Your smoking history, which means you are discriminated against by the Healthcare Industry based on your smoking history. Doctors are trained to trick you when asking about that history. When did you quit smoking is the question, not do you smoke?

No one asks you, when did you quit drinking alcohol or coffee? No one asks you about drugs, since that’s what doctors do, they prescribe drugs, not cigarettes, alcohol or coffee. But then again, no one tries to smoke alcohol or coffee either. Maybe there’s a way, but it’s not in the public domain yet. They both do a lot of harm. But the harm is downplayed.

So it looks like if you can drink it, it’s okay. It’s both legal and encouraged.

Let’s make some nicotine drinks then. Good sell. Great idea. People love to drink. They can’t stop drinking. They always have a beverage of some sort in their hand.

Make it healthy with a healthy dose of nicotine. Varying doses. Do it before Canada does it.

NIC-O-TEEN TEA. NIC-O-TEEN JUICE. Not tiny little bottles that they sell at the check out counter. Those make you look like an addict. Build a display in-store on the floor, end cap. Sell sell sell.

Contains No Animal Products. That’s the deal-breaker.

Then ban the production and sale of cigarettes in the USA inserting the personal use clause. If you really don’t want to be a hypocrite, that is.






 

May Wah Vegan Drumsticks

MAY WAH IMITATION SMOKED DRUMSTICKS

Coated in Sweet Smoky Mustard Sauce and baked till crispy. Garnished with fresh cilantro and served with additional dipping sauce spiked with Balsamic vinegar and a mild sesame seed oil! The texture, flavor and overall mouth-feel is impressive! I would order these out if I had my choice of dipping sauces! I look forward to try more – they’re in the freezer now!! the cilantro is a nice touch!

5 drumsticks

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LOOKIN’ 4 UMAMI

A LESSON IN CREAMY

CREAM OF ASIAN PEAS 2

CREAMY ASIAN APRICOT SAUCE

Hey, I find it strange that so-called food scientists have isolated a taste sensation in soy sauce or shoyu called umami. I have yet to experience it. Maybe my buds are lacking those needed for that discernment. If not lacking, I can’t find anything, in my global-sensitive buds, resembling anything that I would interpret as a profound palatable experience upon consuming soy sauce. Swishing, gurgling, whistling, tried it all and I got nothing.

Until…I combined soy sauce with a creamy agent. The cream in the sauce screamed eureka! when the umami opened for the first time on my taste bud radar in the presence of soy sauce.

I’m wondering if it isn’t the dried fish or other animal additions to most Asian dishes that give those dishes an animal taste – but frankly wouldn’t it do the same with or without the soy sauce?

Tomato – also called a umami food, but usually found in the presence of cheese or other animal components.

Mushrooms? Same thing – always mixed with animal ingredients to enhance the animal flavor.

So for me it happened with a non-animal cream. Better now than never.

The most potent umami food on the planet barring animals – when you define umami as animal-like or enhancing the animal flavor and not simply savory (which by definition connotes an herbal necessity, which soy sauce lacks) is Kalamata olive and anything coming from it.

It is the meat. It is the lamb. It is anything you want it to be with the proper seasonings and additives.

Extra virgin olive oil is many times used by this chef as an animal alternative – no matter the dish presented. It has always been about the fat, or on a coarse piece of animal the gravy, which traditionally has been mostly fat.

If indeed soy sauce alone possesses all the necessary components to be called umami, then this cream sauce augments the umami sufficiently so that my umami-designated buds can discern it. Interestingly, soy has become one of the world’s foremost go-to foods for animal-replacement therapy.

So, in my view, umami-designated taste buds or combination of buds discern the animal taste, no matter the part of the animal. It is those buds that were meant to preserve all species from being eaten, so that when we discerned an animal on our bud-palate, we would instinctively spit it out. Over time as humans became accustomed to eating that which they were designed to reject, the body assimilated, adjusted, turned a blind eye to the existence of another being in its organism – not without its costs though.

Like the heroin addict’s body that adjusts to heroin to keep the body balanced, in the end the heroin which is supposed to be rejected – and always is initially – wins by destroying the human who indulges in it.

Cigarette smoke acts the same way. Initially our body rejects it, but we keep going back for more, till our body adjusts to it, causing symptoms of withdrawal when the cigarette smoke is blocked from entering the organism.  The same is so with alcohol. And coffee and other drugs and substances.

If you cook a mushroom just long enough, it will resemble in texture the mucous membrane, connective tissue, collagen, fat of the animal. A raw mushroom does nothing to excite that resemblance to an animal. Only when cooked does that happen.

Tomatoes. That’s a tough one. Looking for umami and the animal-like component. And maybe that’s it right there. It’s tough. Look at a whole dried tomato, open it, pull it apart, stretch it, yeah, I get the feel and the optics before it even reaches my mouth. The chew is there. Raw tomatoes don’t do that – not for me. Not yet.

Sesame? Sesame oil, not the seeds. Some seeds just texture too much like sand, but squeeze the oil out of them and it’s a whole new day.

One might think that these plant foods were predetermined to satisfy in the human and other animals the desire for eating each other. There had to be a genetically determined way to cause an animal to seek out certain foods, but also to block certain actions taken against other species vying for the same space on the planet. You can’t eat all of your enemies.

It’s all about umami and it’s all in the buds. Chew it and spit it out or chew it and swallow it.

If it can’t get past your nose it can’t get to your palate. There are lots of contradictions in nature that prove that * rule of thumb wrong: Limburger cheese, beer cheese, many cheeses, bread fruit, cooked crucifers, hard-boiled eggs, chitterlings, collard greens, caviar, sardines etc.

So why do we eat something our senses tell us to reject? Because we don’t trust our senses under all circumstances, because we see others do it, because we like breaking our own genetically determined rules for survival, because we like to tempt fate, because it feels good, even though the consequences are bad – but mostly bad long-term. It’s the short-term enjoyment, pleasure, adventure, risk-taking that exhilarates us. That’s how we read it > exhilaration, instead of fear. So there’s a trip-wire someplace that misguides us to think fun instead of fear.

* [RE: RULE OF THUMB reference. You could beat your wife with a stick no thicker than your thumb, but most people don’t make that connection any more. I didn’t. I had to look it up. I thought is was more like a measurement, thumb to eye, however that goes as your thumb moves further away, what does the artist see?]


Glutamate is the most prominent neurotransmitter in the human body/brain. An excess of glutamate has been linked to numerous neurological-based diseases and disorders. Glutamate is most prominently found in animals, but also exists in plant-life.

“Excitotoxicity (Wikipedia)

In humans, it is the main excitatory neurotransmitter, being present in over 50% of nervous tissue….

…Overstimulation of glutamate receptors causes neurodegeneration and neuronal damage through a process called excitotoxicity. Excessive glutamate, or excitotoxins acting on the same glutamate receptors, overactivate glutamate receptors (specifically NMDARs), causing high levels of calcium ions (Ca2+) to influx into the postsynaptic cell.

High Ca2+ concentrations activate a cascade of cell degradation processes involving proteases, lipases, nitric oxide synthase, and a number of enzymes that damage cell structures often to the point of cell death. Ingestion of or exposure to excitotoxins that act on glutamate receptors can induce excitotoxicity and cause toxic effects on the central nervous system. This becomes a problem for cells, as it feeds into a cycle of positive feedback cell death.

Glutamate excitotoxicity triggered by overstimulation of glutamate receptors also contributes to intracellular oxidative stress. Proximal glial cells use a cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) to transport cystine into the cell and glutamate out. Excessive extracellular glutamate concentrations reverse xCT, so glial cells no longer have enough cystine to synthesize glutathione (GSH), an antioxidant. Lack of GSH leads to more reactive oxygen species (ROSs) that damage and kill the glial cell, which then cannot reuptake and process extracellular glutamate. This is another positive feedback in glutamate excitotoxicity. In addition, increased Ca2+ concentrations activate nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the over-synthesis of nitric oxide(NO). High NO concentration damages mitochondria, leading to more energy depletion, and adds oxidative stress to the neuron as NO is a ROS.“…wikipedia

…Further, glutamate occupies a central position in amino acid metabolism in plants.”


Glutatamate is an amino acid associated with proteins – animal or plant.

In fact, the existence of glutamate in animals and plants is pervasive.

Since eating plants has not been associated with neurological diseases and disorders (NDAD), it might be wise to reduce the amount of glutamate ingested by reducing significantly or totally the amount of animal products ingested.

You can still have your umami and eat it too – only through plants, would be the correct survival advantage choice to make, not through animals.








 

KIRBY Vanilla Lemonade

KIRBY VANILLA LEMONADE

After a long day at the office, coming home to a Kirby Vanilla Lemonade is just what my inner self ordered!

Makes 1 tall drink

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AFC Persimmon Tonic Water Dressing ©

#2 ANIMAL-FREE SOUS-CHEF

AFC PERSIMMON TONIC WATER DRESSING ©

A simple, creamy, light, rich, persimmon salad dressing with the uncanny ability to make all the ingredients in your salad shine – a blessing. For special occasions when you are out to IMPRESS! Oh, and the surprise ingredient? Diet Tonic Water. Wow. It works. Perfect for fruit salads!

Makes 3 cups

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WeedMD and Phivida To Enter Into Joint Venture for Cannabis-Infused Beverages

WeedMD and Phivida To Enter Into Joint Venture for Cannabis-Infused Beverages

CanBev Inc. positioned to become the premiere cannabis-infused bottling plant in Canada.

Toronto, Canada and Vancouver, Canada, March 8th, 2018  WeedMD Inc. (TSX-V:WMD) (OTC:WDDMF) (FSE:4WE) (“WeedMD”), a federally licensed producer and distributor of medical cannabis and Phivida Holdings Inc. (CSE:VIDAOTC:PHVAF) (“Phivida”), a premium brand of cannabidiol (“CBD”) infused functional beverages and clinical health products, are pleased to announce the signing of a letter of intent (“LOI”) to form a joint venture focused on cannabis-infused beverages. The new joint venture company, Cannabis Beverages Inc. (“CanBev”), plans to develop a production facility at WeedMD’s state-of-the-art greenhouse in Strathroy, Ontario. …

FINISH READING: Free Email Addresses: Web based and secure Email – mail.com






 

The Impossible Burger – update

This is one popular burger. Everybody wants it. Even burger joints that sell only animal meat want it. Fortunately for me several locations all at once, near enough so I could get to them, started putting it on their menus.

We ordered it at Earth Bistro in Cleveland, a restaurant that makes everything they serve on the menu vegan-friendly. Can be made vegan.

Probably, but I don’t know for sure, most burger eaters like their burgers medium rare. This was my experience with The Impossible Burger.

Yes, it had a blood taste, but it textured too soft. It seemed barely cooked, barely even warm. In fact the bun was warmer than the burger.

Steve felt like I did. It was okay as far as burgers that bleed go, but he likes his burgers well done. So do I.

When speaking to the owner, he said of course they were still learning to work with it, and that if cooked beyond a certain temperature, it stiffens considerably according to the instructions.

I’m not sure if they actually wasted one by experimenting with it, but you really need to do that.

Firming this burger up, allowing for a longer cook time so when it gets to the customer it is still hot is important.

It wasn’t cohesive enough, and of course it plopped out the sides of the sandwich when I bit into it, more like a chicken salad only made with a burger.

The Impossible Burger is too fragile. Not wanting to lose a burger, cooks are so afraid to go beyond the temperature suggested, that they undercook it. That’s my take on it.

Tighten it up and don’t be afraid to add a little salt.

I won’t order another one until it’s improved. I certainly do appreciate the effort that went into the development of this burger. I look forward to the new and improved IMPOSSIBLE BURGER – maybe a separate one that’s well done. Two varieties: Medium rare – well done.


UPDATE on 7 March 2018

I posted my short review of THE IMPOSSIBLE BURGER onto THE IMPOSSIBLE BURGER Facebook Page. This was there response:

Impossible Foods Thank you for reaching out, Sharon! We’re sorry to hear that your experience didn’t meet your expectations. We’re always working to improve, and we really appreciate your feedback. 👍

If you decide to give the Impossible Burger another go, we’d recommend requesting that it be prepared more well-done. Everyone likes their burgers cooked differently, but we enjoy a medium well preparation of our product.”

My Comment > So, it can be cooked longer than the chef cooked it. Cooks and chefs all over should know this. Like the person from Impossible Foods said, they enjoy a medium-well, which probably is perfect. I will try it again and make my requests and report back. Thank you to IMPOSSIBLE FOODS for clearing that up for me – and anybody else who experienced the same problem.

 






 

Red Rice by Lotus Foods – my new favorite rice

RED RICE by LOTUS FOODS

This is the first time making or tasting red rice. Although they state that the rice can be used in any dish calling for rice, I discovered another use unrelated to rice – as a hamburg substitute in chili. Looks like hamburg, textured closely like cooked hamburg, so I’m going to give it a try to see what happens.  Results to come in another post!

Males 7 cups

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The Beyond Burger Hits Bareburger Menus NATIONWIDE

 

Attention all Bareburger lovers: as of today The Beyond Burger will be offered on-menu at all 38 of their locations NATIONWIDE, enabling more consumers to EatWhat You Love™!Replacing the elk and wild boar options on the menu, The Beyond Burger joins the Bareburger menu nationwide, offering consumers even more diverse protein options.

We’re thrilled that Bareburger joins a growing list of national burger-centric restaurants, including BurgerFi and TGI Fridays, carrying The Beyond Burger…

FINISH READING: The Beyond Burger Hits Bareburger Menus NATIONWIDE | Blog | Beyond Meat






 

Phivida Appoints Former Red Bull President as CEO

Phivida Appoints Former Red Bull President as Chief Executive Officer

VANCOUVER, B.C. — February 28th, 2018 — Phivida Holdings Inc. (“Phivida” or the “Company”) (CSE: VIDA; OTCMKTS: PHVAF) has appointed Mr. James Bailey as the new Chief Executive Officer (CEO), commencing March 19th, 2018.  As former President of Red Bull Canada, Mr. Bailey stewarded the development of an entirely new category of alternative beverages, an experience which lends great value to Phivida as it prepares to launch into the global market.

Mr. Bailey will be responsible for building Phivida into an internationally recognized brand and replicating his success with building a new alternative beverage sector at Red Bull.

Mr. Bailey also brings proven executive leadership and extensive expertise in brand marketing and athletic endorsement for multinational consumer brands. Under his leadership, Mr. Bailey established Red Bull as the national brand leader in its category and grew annual sales revenue from $0 to over $150 million.

In addition to Red Bull, Mr. Bailey also served as the Chief Marketing Officer for Merrell Outdoors and has senior executive experience with Adidas and Salomon ski equipment…

FINISH READING: Phivida Appoints Former Red Bull President as CEO






 

Roman Beans by Goya

GOYA ROAMN BEANS 2

Roman beans are popular in Italy. Their meaty texture stands up well in soups and various sauces.

AFC 5 SPICE SOUP 3

TRY THIS SOUP or try them in one of your own soups and see what you think > https://fat-freechef.com/2018/02/26/afc-5-spice-tomato-bean-soup/






 

AFC 5 SPICE ©

AFC 5 SPICE 1

AFC 5 SPICE © – HOW TO MAKE

All you need is an electric coffee bean grinder and 5 spices. 5 Spice is somewhat like curry. Everybody who uses it has their own combination and amounts of spices they prefer. This is mine! Hope you like it!

Makes a little more than 1/4 c.


the equivalent of 5 whole dried stars of anise

3 rounded t. whole cloves

2 inch long cinnamon stick, broken into small pieces

2 t. previously finely ground fennel seed

1 t. previously ground black pepper


Place stars of anise, cloves and cinnamon bits into well of clean coffee bean grinder. Process till crumbly, then till as fine as you can get it, turning unit off every 15 seconds or so to make sure it doesn’t overheat.

Stir up from bottom, then add ground fennel and ground black pepper and reprocess again till as smooth as it can get.

Transfer to covered spice jar and store at room temperature.


Many years ago I bought some Chinese Five Spice at an Asian Oriental market. I used it, didn’t like it and never used it again. Till now.

Steve suggested I make my own. I did. Now I like it – my way of course. I’m not sure what spices were in the original spice I bought so long ago, but the star anise was overpowering and the fragrance and flavor actually made me a little nauseated. I like licorice and fennel so didn’t know what they put in it that was offensive. Anyway, it doesn’t matter. I found my own combination that works for me.

Traditionally Chinese Five Spice was used in animal meat dishes, probably to disguise the flavor of the bad meat. It’s not that amenable to veggie dishes. I did however make a tomato bean soup using my version of the spice and I liked it.

Use sparingly till you know how it flavors a dish. Too much and the dish gets ruined. Rubbing it on meat and then grilling it doesn’t make much difference because a lot of it gets burned off. Since we don’t cook with animals, we use the spice combination more judiciously with no one spice overpowering any of the others.

TRY THIS SOUP: https://fat-freechef.com/2018/02/26/afc-5-spice-tomato-bean-soup/

AFC 5 SPICE 5

AFC 5 SPICE 5






 

Veg Scrambled Egg And Garbonzo Bean Salsa

VEG SCRAMBLED EGG AND GARBANZO BEAN SALSA

Not your ordinary salsa! I like this so much that I eat it plain as a snack. Also can be used in a sandwich or as a salad served on a lettuce leaf. Multipurpose is what I like and I love this chewy texture, multi flavor, varied color, high protein content – everything good salsa! And so will you!

Makes almost 5 cups

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