Posted in Products Tried

CHOCOLOVE ginger crystallized in dark chocolate

When Steve brings home specialty chocolate bars, I rarely refuse at most half a bar. We both love ginger flavor in just about anything.

The crystallized texture was there, and a little reminiscent of the crystals one feels on the mouth when eating grana padano cheese, but the ginger flavor was absolutely missing.

That leads me to believe that the bar was old. A lot of these gourmet/specialty-type food products don’t sell quickly, and who checks dates or would even know the codes that different manufacturers use to let one know a product is outdated?

In fact, it appears that the purpose might be to deceive the buyer as to when it becomes outdated. Otherwise, why not put it clear as day, where people can see, read and understand it? Not too difficult, unless the purpose is as I said to deceive.

Store clerks never check dates. It’s up to the customer to point it out. But if the customer can’t figure it out or find it, then what?

Although the candy bar was good, I feel cheated. These aren’t cheap.

I saved the wrapper. Upon further inspection of all the data on the wrapper I found something that said APP until looking further and it said APR. Now I’m thinking April, then 201 PULL DATE. 201? Must not be a pull date, until looking closer and I found 9 in the border of another color (green) on the packaging. 2019.

Well now, there really is something wrong with that candy bar beyond its misidentified as old by its lack of ginger flavor. It’s well within the pull date, so should have tasted like ginger. Hot and spicy is how they described the ginger, which as I indicated was missing.

I don’t want to be eating candy anyway. I already spent way too much time on this.

There is a problem, however, industry-wide with specialty items, notably vegan items that stores keep beyond their pull dates, thinking if it’s vegan it must not be perishable, because it doesn’t contain any animal products. This of course isn’t true. So store managers need to be educated and the distributors need to do the educating, or the companies that sell the products need to do it. I’m not expecting any action on this, since to sell a product one doesn’t want to start talking pull dates and spoilage.

I won’t buy this product again. I don’t know how ginger gets old, since I have powdered ginger in my pantry at least two years old and it’s still strong-flavored.

In the photo, up close, the pull date becomes more obvious.






 

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Posted in Labeling

Labels + Current Diet Categories

Hardly anyone knows what vegan is even today nearly 40 years later. They’ve become familiar with the word, but not the meaning. They don’t get why vegans won’t eat a vegetarian burger made with egg whites, or that fish and chicken are animals. And what’s wrong with cheese? That’s not an animal. Well, real vegans don’t understand why vegetarians won’t eat a burger that contains no animal products. And you have to wonder why a person serving food wouldn’t know where what they serve comes from. Then there’s the added confusion of people calling themselves vegans who eat fish or chicken, or who are strictly animal-free sometimes.

Continue reading “Labels + Current Diet Categories”

Posted in Labeling

The Plant-Based Pitfall

The current trend in labeling a manufactured food, that CONTAINS NO ANIMAL PRODUCTS (CNAP), is to label it PLANT-BASED rather than VEGAN, or ANIMAL-FREE. Some worry about the negativity associated with animal rights groups, so veer from the usage of the word vegan on their product even though it might be vegan.

Continue reading “The Plant-Based Pitfall”

Posted in Hey

Foreign Foods In Foreign Lands

I don’t like French food in France. I don’t like Russian food in Russia, I don’t like Hawaiian food in Hawaii. I don’t like Asian food in Hawaii. I don’t like Italian food in Italy. I don’t like German food in Germany. I don’t like Mexican food in Mexico. I don’t like English food in Britain. I don’t like Dutch food in Holland (the Netherlands). I don’t like Swiss food in Switzerland. I don’t like Belgian food in Belgium. I don’t like Austrian food in Austria. I don’t like Finnish food in Finland.

I don’t like street food anywhere.

I like everything À la Sharon. My way not your way. My taste buds not yours. In the style and manner of me. Using ingredients I like from everywhere that I want them from, combined and cooked the way I like to combine and cook them, not according to your culture or your dried up used up old never going to work for me method. I don’t give a rat’s ass about your culture and how you dismember an animal dead or alive passed down from generation to generation of serial offenders.

I don’t like your bread unless it’s made in an American bakery – the way I like bread to be made, the way I like bread to taste and texture. I don’t want you to pound the dough on a rock with filthy hands you scratched your ass and the snot from your nose with, then sell it to me as authentic.

The only thing I want authentic is me – not your greasy, slimy, dirty, grown in toilet water garbage that you call authentic foreign food.

I don’t like the animal in anything.

So all you foreigners who eat insects, keep them out of the foods you sell to me, unbeknownst to me, because you made a deal with somebody in the USA government giving you permission to use products I don’t want in my food. We’ll make the people adjust was the plan.

Not this old lady. I don’t adjust to slaughter and filth and allergic reactions to shell insects – yeah that’s right. Shell fish. Shell insects, beetles, whatever the name du jour happens to be in any given year. Keep your allergy producing foods in your own country, in your own pantry. I don’t want them.

It’s about moving forward – not moving backwards, where we all return to the jungle to scrape the dirt with sticks to gouge up worms for snacks. Whose global planning idea was that?

Fire their asses.






Posted in Labeling

WHAT CONSTITUTES ANIMAL-FREE TO ME

 ANIMAL-FREE VEGAN COMPANIES ARE STILL IN THEIR BIRTHING STAGE

What this means is that for many companies to get up and running they need to use the factories that other companies use to manufacture their goods that do contain animal products. They basically rent out the facilities, thus the common labeling of possible and/or traces of allergens – among them animal products – on their animal-free vegan goods. Continue reading “WHAT CONSTITUTES ANIMAL-FREE TO ME”