Categories
GREEN QUEEN H.K. NET NEWS

EXCLUSIVE COVERAGE & INSIGHTS BY GREEN QUEEN

Swedish oat milk giant Oatly has indicated it could be seeking a public listing in Hong Kong, shortly after registering its planned IPO on the Nasdaq stock exchange with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The Blackstone-backed company says it will pursue a Hong Kong listing in the case of any “material adverse effect” on its relationship with state-owned Chinese conglomerate China Resources.


Why it’s important: China Resources is one of Oatly’s largest shareholders, and having it as a major backer will no doubt propel Oatly’s Asia-focused global expansion – especially as it eyes the lucrative business opportunity to be made in China, the world’s second largest economy. While there are perks for Oatly’s China and Asia strategy, it could pose issues if U.S. authorities decide to crack down on Chinese-owned firms, so seeking a Hong Kong listing is a smart workaround.


Led by a team of Czech biotechnologists and food scientists, Prague-based startup Bene Meat Technologies is the first and only project in Central and Eastern Europe working on bringing cultivated meat to plates.


Why it’s important: Bene Meat revealed that they are also focused on creating affordable FBS-free medium alternatives that can replace the current standard used in laboratories, a feat that would dramatically reduce costs for cell-based protein producers, ultimately making the end-product much more competitive when it reaches market. The firm’s focus is testament to the fact that cell-cultured protein should be available to all, not just the few.


Hungry Planet recently closed a US$25 million Series A financing round to help build capacity for its wide range of chef-crafted plant-based meats and accelerate its growth domestically and internationally.


Why it’s important: co-founder Jody Boyman commented: “Hungry Planet is the first and only company to deliver a complete range of plant-based meats. While others in this category are still working on beef and burgers, Hungry Planet is delivering on a much broader range featuring craveable taste and texture with demonstrably superior nutrition.”


Female-founded food tech Orbillion Bio raised US$5 million in an oversubscribed seed round for the development of its cruelty-free lab-grown alternatives to ‘heritage meats’ like wagyu beef, elk, sheep, and American bison.


Why it’s important: in a previous interview with Green Queen, Orbillion Bio co-founder and CEO Dr. Patricia Bubner discussed the company’s process and why it stands out from other similar competitors in the market. “Our advanced bioprocessing enables us to rapidly isolate, screen and select cells that are best suited for commercial-scale food production. This allows us to move from sample to finished product 5x faster than other companies.” On the products, ex-GoogleX co-founder and managing partner at At One Ventures, Tom Chi, said: “This has the potential to both address the higher end of the marketplace as well as the possibility of biodiversity wins from lessened pressure on game animals.”


Female-founded food tech Orbillion Bio raised US$5 million in an oversubscribed seed round for the development of its cruelty-free lab-grown alternatives to ‘heritage meats’ like wagyu beef, elk, sheep, and American bison.


Why it’s important: in a previous interview with Green Queen, Orbillion Bio co-founder and CEO Dr. Patricia Bubner discussed the company’s process and why it stands out from other similar competitors in the market. “Our advanced bioprocessing enables us to rapidly isolate, screen and select cells that are best suited for commercial-scale food production. This allows us to move from sample to finished product 5x faster than other companies.” On the products, ex-GoogleX co-founder and managing partner at At One Ventures, Tom Chi, said: “This has the potential to both address the higher end of the marketplace as well as the possibility of biodiversity wins from lessened pressure on game animals.”


Israeli food tech BioMilk went public on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange this month, becoming the world’s first publicly traded cell-based milk company. The startup produces real cow’s milk and human breast milk directly from cells, and plans to release its first samples over the next two years.


Why it’s important: BioMilk is also ambitious to make its presence known globally, saying that its latest IPO move was just the beginning. With its long-term goal to enter multiple international markets, the startup says that a U.S. IPO on the prestigious Nasdaq exchange isn’t off the cards


American multinational food giant ADM has just opened a new plant-based innovation lab in Singapore, as the firm pivots to ramp up alternative protein development and production in response to “rapidly growing consumer demand” across the Asia-Pacific.


Why it’s important: housing a team of experts in proteins and texturing ingredients and flavouring specialists, ADM says that the new hub will be able to come up with and scale new plant-based products for customers that are “tailor-made” for Asian appetites and palates. ADM’s decision to open its innovation lab in Singapore will further solidify the island’s strong reputation as an alternative protein hub.


Alternative protein and dairy restaurant chain player Globally Local debuted on the Toronto Stock Exchange’s Venture Exchange on April 16, becoming the first vegan fast-food company to go public in Canada.


Why it’s important: the TSXV is the eighth largest stock market in the world in terms of market capitalization, and the third-largest in North America. Globally Local develops its own proteins and dairy alternatives, distributes them to several other restaurants and is able to supply the massive demand due to its own, high-tech food manufacturing facility.


Hong Kong-based cellular agriculture startup Avant Meats has announced that it will be establishing its R&D and pilot manufacturing plant in Singapore. The plan, supported by the Singapore Economic Development Board, will enable Avant Meats to scale up and speed up the route to market, given the regulatory framework already in place in the city-state.


Why it’s important: Carrie Chan, co-founder and CEO of Avant Meats, commented: “Avant has grown its presence in strategic locations in Asia to optimise its market access, technology ecosystem, and funding opportunities. Singapore provides Avant with regulatory clarity, international talents, and sufficient space for the next step of scaling up.” The firm plans to bring its cell-based dish fillet to market in 2023, and is poised to disrupt the global US$60.5 billion seafood market, primarily driven by Asia-Pacific consumers.


Clara Foods, the San Francisco-based food tech fermenting animal-free proteins, has teamed up with ZX Ventures, the innovation arm of the world’s largest brewing company AB InBev. The new R&D partnership will be tasked to “unlock precision fermentation” and its potential to “brew” egg proteins without chickens on a large scale.


Why it’s important: eggs, one of the most widely available and affordable sources of protein globally, remains a category ripe for alternative protein disruption. Teaming up with a centuries-old firm will bring in vital know-how, while the Bay Area startup will offer its technological leadership in the precision fermentation space.


Agribusiness giant Cargill has invested in Bflike, a startup hailing from the Netherlands that licenses its proprietary plant-based technology and ingredient solutions to food companies looking to produce alternative proteins. The partnership between Cargill and Bflike will mean faster and more affordable routes to market for new “next generation” plant-based meat and fish analogues.
Why it’s important: the partnership with Cargill will mean a “seamless” transition for food businesses, producers and retailers who want to license Bflike’s technology, to move from pilot stage to commercialisation. It will also mean faster scale-up timelines for food producers who use their own facilities and machinery, while being supported by Cargill’s secure ingredients supply chain.


Food processing solutions giant Bühler has joined forces with Givaudan, the world’s largest flavour and fragrance manufacturer, to open an Asia Pacific plant-based protein innovation centre in Singapore. The centre will be managed by experts from both firms to increase the production and simultaneous consumption of sustainable plant-based products on a global scale.


Why it’s important: Bühler’s technology and processing equipment and Givaudan’s culinary capabilities will allow the center to produce 40 kilograms of plant proteins per hour. Givaudan Taste & Wellbeing, Monila Kothari, commented: “By bringing flavor solutions that are vegetarian, vegan, plant-based and natural, as well as technologies such as wet extrusion to Singapore and the region, we are helping to make plant-based foods more delicious, authentic, and accessible to business and consumers.”








Categories
ADVERTISING BURGER KING

Burger King Launches Moldy Whopper Campaign

TA-FC ClipBoard: “The beauty of real food is that it gets ugly”? “Mold can be a beautiful thing”? That’s a real stretch, calling mold on beef, lettuce, tomato, onion, and a bun beautiful. The spoiled mayo also beautiful?

Associating harmful, nasty, disgusting photos of a mold-laden sandwich with the Whopper is for sure a novel approach to selling any type of food. It just goes against what people have known forever – optics count.

Sure nobody believes the picture perfect photos that ads show of their products, that resemble the actual product only in type of ingredients, not the true visual appearance when you actually buy one. But when associating it with mold and other nasty stuff, when in fact, nobody is served such a sandwich, makes one question the sanity of such an approach.

One thing advertisers avoid is associating a product with something repulsive or unhealthy or grotesque for obvious reasons. Nobody in their right mind would want to eat such a product. The optics alone would drive consumers away.

Now that the MOLDY WHOPPER is out there, people who buy whoppers will automatically associate what they are about to eat with the disgusting looking, nasty stuff that has caught the world’s eye unawares. Still, the brain does what the brain does – connects bad looking stuff, mold no less, lots of different species of mold it looks like, but doesn’t automatically connect all the reasons for that Old Moldy thing, except to avoid it.

The brain isn’t registering free of additives, free of preservatives, free of artificial ingredients, and free of a bunch of other undesirable added ingredients when it views that MOLDY MESS. The brain doesn’t imprint an entire paragraph of free-of-this and free-of-that. The brain imprints an image of a moldy mess. The brain runs away from it. It doesn’t marry it to live happily ever after in the stomach that the brain controls.

Is it appetizing? No. No. Get away. Don’t come near me. You are making me sick by looking at you. Halt I say. HALT. Do not enter my stomach nor my field of vision.

Fernando Machado took a huge risk that obviously made sense to him. Yet, by all reasonable accounts he overthought the process and overshot the goal of communicating to the public that Burger King’s burgers are made of only cows – and nothing else that otherwise may preserve the ingredients, becoming I assume mold-resistant.

Maybe Fernando Machado doesn’t realize the extent that people will go to avoid mold, especially toxic, injurious molds, any kind of mold. People in general like anything that is mold-resistant.

Maybe this concept of non-mold resistant prepared food will be popular with the millennials whom he targets; maybe millennials even like mold, but it’s a difficult concept to swallow, that by seeing a moldy sandwich someone would want to buy a non-moldy sandwich made in the same establishment. Even less convincing is that it would increase rather than decrease sales. Nothing fits here. There’s no logic. Maybe the point was to confuse the buyer, but why?

It’s an advertising gamble that may work or not. Frankly, it should fall flat on it’s moldy bun. If it doesn’t, then I’d have to say our brains have actually changed in the way our brains process information.

If it works to increase sales, we can all expect an onslaught of grotesque image ads designed to compare the bad with the good. Eventually, somehow, our brains will adapt to seeing them both as worthy – with the more prominent, albeit grotesque, of the images winning out and leaving it’s footprint smack in the desire bins of our minds.

Soon enough our brains will begin to crave the more dominant grotesque image over the actual recessive image which will reap benefits to the seller of all food products, who will eventually sell you what is grotesque by popular demand.

What’s a little mold on your sandwich, right? Better than all that other junk they used to add.

Of course this all could have been avoided, had Fernando Machado not overthought the process and overshot the goal of communicating a better sandwich by showing you what a better sandwich looks like – a MOLDY MESS that is both beautiful and desirable.


Kelly Tyko, USA TODAY

USA TODAYFebruary 19, 2020

Burger King is serving up a new global ad campaign with its iconic burger covered in mold.

No, the “Moldy Whopper” is not a new menu item, but Burger King announced Wednesday that it is letting the burger rot to make a statement.

The fast-food chain said in a news release that it’s showing mold “can be a beautiful thing” to highlight removing artificial preservatives from the Whopper in most European countries and in select U.S. markets.

Unlike viral images and videos that have shown restaurant burgers changing very little over several years, the Burger King ad is a time-lapse referencing the number of days passed since the sandwich was prepared and showing the growth of mold. It includes a line that reads, “The beauty of no artificial preservatives.” 

Fernando Machado, global chief marketing officer for Burger King’s parent company, Restaurant Brands International, told USA TODAY that officials wanted to do something that would stand out. 

“The beauty of real food is that it gets ugly. It’s common knowledge that real food deteriorates quicker because it is free of artificial preservatives,” Machado said. “Instead of featuring our Whopper sandwich with the classic flawless and often too perfect photographic style typically used in fast food advertising, we decided to showcase something real, honest and that only Burger King could do.”

Burger King has launched an ad campaign featuring a moldy Whopper.
Burger King has launched an ad campaign featuring a moldy Whopper.

A Whopper with no preservatives, colors or flavors from artificial sources is now available in 400 U.S. locations and “will reach all restaurants throughout the year,” Christopher Finazzo, Burger King’s president for the Americas, said in a statement.

The company also announced that more than 90% of food ingredients at Burger King restaurants are free from colors, flavors, and preservatives from artificial sources. MSG and high-fructose corn syrup have also been removed from all food items, the company said.

Moving away from artificial ingredients isn’t new.

Rival McDonald’s announced in 2018 that most of its burgers were free of fake colors, flavors and preservatives. 

A growing number of national fast-food chains have also said they would rid their chicken or beef supplies of antibiotics, including Chick-fil-A, which met its goal in May, months ahead of schedule.

Millennials also tend to favor foods with fewer artificial ingredients and that are less processed, Beth Bloom, market research firm Mintel’s associate director of U.S. food and drink, told USA TODAY in August.

“It’s OK for something to have fat,” Bloom said. “It just needs to be kind of whole ingredients.”

Follow USA TODAY reporter Kelly Tyko on Twitter: @KellyTyko

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Burger King’s new ad campaign has moldy Whopper to highlight changes






Categories
BURGER KING IMPOSSIBLE FOODS TEST PRODUCT REVIEWS TEST PRODUCTS

IMPOSSIBLE WHOPPER

This is the burger everybody’s been talking about and quite frankly, compared to the other Impossible Burgers I’ve had this hardly resembled it.

There are two ways you can order this burger at Burger King cooked: either flame broiled, or microwaved for those who don’t want their burger cooked on the same surface an animal patty was cooked. I chose flame broiled, since I’m not into that two kitchen thing that observant Jews do: one for flesh and one for milk, cheese and eggs, since it’s against their religious beliefs to have them touch each other.

I ordered it flame broiled, but it didn’t taste nor texture like what I’ve had in the past, which could only mean they microwaved it.

It was also thinner, much thinner and drier, so I’m surmising the people at Impossible Foods took the animal patty and made a close replica of it. Evidently not all Impossible burgers are equal.

The girl doing the cooking in the back didn’t know what vegan meant when the guy up front asked her if the mayo was vegan. The up front guy had to look on a small packet of mayonnaise and he couldn’t see it, so I looked and immediately saw contains egg. He said I was so rapid that I gave him a headache.

The guy assured me there was no animal in the bun, but who knows.

There was only one other person in the store eating and it looked like it was closed from the outside. It also looked like they were trying to save on electricity. Dark inside, dark outside. It was a freaky experience. I was happy to get back on the bus into familiar territory.

It tasted like a whopper. The burgers I recall from fast food decades ago were pretty dry. It was all the goop on them that made them taste good.






 

Categories
BURGER KING IMPOSSIBLE FOODS NET NEWS

Behold the Beefless ‘Impossible Whopper’

By Nathaniel Popper

Photographs and Video by Matt Edge

OAKLAND, Calif. — Would you like that Whopper with or without beef?

This week, Burger King is introducing a version of its iconic Whopper sandwich filled with a vegetarian patty from the start-up Impossible Foods.

The Impossible Whopper, as it will be known, is the biggest validation — and expansion opportunity — for a young industry that is looking to mimic and replace meat with plant-based alternatives.

Impossible Foods and its competitors in Silicon Valley have already had some mainstream success. The vegetarian burger made by Beyond Meat has been available at over a thousand Carl’s Jr. restaurants since January and the company is now moving toward an initial public offering.

White Castle has sold a slider version of the Impossible burger in its 380 or so stores since late last year.

But a national rollout at Burger King’s 7,200 locations would dwarf those previous announcements and more than double the total number of locations where Impossible’s burgers are available…