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BEEF MAGAZINE NET NEWS

Better management can reduce beef production emissions

TAFC COMMENT: THE GIST. To reduce beef emissions by nearly 50% all the cattle industry has to do is, according to them: ‘grow bigger cows at a faster rate – and enhance land management strategies to increase soil and plant carbon sequestration on grazed lands’


Better management can reduce beef production emissions

Scientists from UC, Colorado State University say industry can halve greenhouse gas emissions in certain regions.

Christine Griffiths | Apr 06, 2021

A comprehensive assessment of 12 different strategies for reducing beef production emissions worldwide found that industry can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 50% in certain regions, with the most potential in the United States and Brazil. The study, “Reducing Climate Impacts of Beef Production: A synthesis of life cycle assessments across management systems and global regions,” was published Monday, April 5 in Global Change Biology.

A research team, led by Colorado State University and funded by the Climate and Land Use Alliance, found that widespread use of improved ranching management practices in two distinct areas of beef production would lead to substantial emissions reductions. This includes increased efficiency to produce more beef per unit of GHG emitted – growing bigger cows at a faster rate – and enhanced land management strategies to increase soil and plant carbon sequestration on grazed lands.

Globally, cattle produce about 78% of total livestock GHG emissions. Yet, there are many known management solutions that, if adopted broadly, can reduce, but not totally eliminate, the beef industry’s climate change footprint, according to lead author Daniela Cusack, an assistant professor in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability at CSU.

Overall, the research team found a 46% reduction in net GHG emissions per unit of beef was achieved at sites using carbon sequestration management strategies on grazed lands, including using organic soil amendments and restoring trees and perennial vegetation to areas of degraded forests, woodlands and riverbanks. Additionally, researchers found an overall 8% reduction in net GHGs was achieved at sites using growth efficiency strategies. Net-zero emissions, however, were only achieved in 2% of studies.

“Our analysis shows that we can improve the efficiency and sustainability of beef production, which would significantly reduce the industry’s climate impact,” said Cusack, also a research associate at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. “But at the same time, we will never reach net-zero emissions without further innovation and strategies beyond land management and increased growth efficiency. There’s a lot of room, globally, for improvement.” Co-authors on the paper include Alexandra Hedgpeth, Kenyon Chow and Jason Karpman of the University of California, Los Angeles; and Rebecca Ryals of UC Merced.

Global analysis

Researchers analyzed 292 comparisons of “improved” versus “conventional” beef production systems across Asia, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Latin America and the U.S. The analysis revealed that Brazilian beef production holds the most potential for emissions reductions.

In the studies analyzed, researchers found a 57% GHG emission reduction through improved management strategies for both carbon sequestration and production efficiency in Brazil. Specific strategies include improved feed quality, better breed selections and enhanced fertilizer management.

The biggest impact was found in integrated field management, including intensive rotational grazing schemes, adding soil compost, reforestation of degraded areas and selectively planting forage plants bred for sequestering carbon in soils.

“My home country of Brazil has more than 52 million hectares of degraded pastureland – larger than the state of California,” said Amanda Cordeiro, co-author and a graduate student at CSU. “If we can aim for a large-scale regeneration of degraded pastures, implementation of silvo-agro-forestry systems and adoption of other diversified local management strategies to cattle production, Brazil can drastically decrease carbon emissions.”

In the U.S., researchers found that carbon sequestration strategies such as integrated field management and intensive rotational grazing reduced beef GHG emissions by more than 100% – or net-zero emissions – in a few grazing systems. But efficiency strategies were not as successful in the U.S. studies, possibly because of a high use of the strategies in the region already.

“Our research shows the important role that ranchers can play in combatting the global climate crisis, while ensuring their livelihoods and way of life,” said Clare Kazanski, co-author and North America region scientist with The Nature Conservancy. “By analyzing management strategies in the U.S. and around the world, our research reinforces that ranchers are in a key position to reduce emissions in beef production through various management strategies tailored to their local conditions.”

Darrell Wood, a northern California rancher, is an example of a producer leading the way on climate-friendly practices. Wood’s family participates in the California Healthy Soils program, which incentivizes practices with a demonstrated climate benefit.

“As a sixth-generation cattle rancher, I see nothing but upside potential from using our cattle as a tool for reducing greenhouse gas emissions,” Wood said. “Taking good care of our grasslands not only benefits climate, but also wildlife and the whole ecosystem that generates clean air and water. It’ll help the next generation continue our business, too.”

Next steps

Although the research shows a significant reduction in the GHG footprints of beef production using improved management strategies, scientists don’t yet know the full potential of shifting to these emission-reducing practices because there are very few data on practice adoption levels around the world.

“Asia, for example, is one of the most rapidly growing beef markets, but there is an imbalance between the amount of research focus on improving beef production and the growing demand for beef,” Cusack said. “We know with the right land management and efficiency strategies in place, it’s possible to have large reductions in emissions across geographic regions, but we need to keep pushing for additional innovations to create a truly transformation shift in the way the global beef system operates to ensure a secure food supply and a healthy environment.”

Source: Better management can reduce beef production emissions






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BEEF MAGAZINE CORONAVIRUS/COVID-19 NET NEWS

Why Isn’t The Cattle Industry Vaccinating It’s Cattle Against CORONACOVID19?

THE CATTLE MARKET perspective on vaccines:

From BEEF MAGAZINE:

PROCESSING PLANTS ESTABLISHING VACCINE PLANS

What they should be doing is administering these to the cattle.

86 POSTS ON VACCINES on BEEF MAGAZINE site proves cows and other animals receive vaccines.

https://www.beefmagazine.com/search/node/vaccines?f%5B0%5D=search_api_aggregation_1%3AVaccines

Frozen Vaccines for cattle – they do it with other vaccines, for other cow diseases, but are not yet doing it with coronacovid19

TAGS: ANIMAL HEALTHVACCINES Chances are, when you purchased a new refrigerator for the house, you moved the old one to the barn. Problem is, in addition to being worn out, these

Clint Peck Contributing editor | Jan 01, 2007

Chances are, when you purchased a new refrigerator for the house, you moved the old one to the barn. Problem is, in addition to being worn out, these old units can be very inefficient compared to modern refrigerators. They freeze items placed near the rear element; in the summer, they barely keep cool because the doors don’t seal well.

Freezing is one of the worst events that can happen to livestock pharmaceutical products. It’s something that can easily happen to everything in the old ‘fridge over a large part of the country during the winter.

“Improperly stored vaccines are a leading cause of immune response failure,” he says. “Not only can this mean money down the drain, but when we use these improperly stored vaccines, we get a false sense of security that our cattle are protected.”

Most labels suggest storing vaccines between 35°F and 45°F….


TAFC ClipBoard:

Humans are animals, so the virus jumped from animal to animal! Have they started testing cows, pigs, lambs, chickens and all the animals the world eats yet?

No, because there’s no science to warrant it.

If it can spread rapidly from human animal to human animal and from non-human animal to human animal, then we need to look at all the non-human animals we eat and see if the virus jumped from non-human animal to non-human animal. Of course it did. Just like it jumped from human animal to human animal. You don’t need a degree in how to raise animals for slaughter to figure that out.

The slaughter industries and governments around the globe are blocking it. That’s a lot of power invested in keeping silent about the food the world eats.

Cattle are given vaccines against other viruses, so we know they can catch viruses. From whom, what animal, do these cows catch these viruses? And do they pass them into the food you eat?

Well yes, if they’re infected and you eat an infected animal. So why so slow to focus on the animals we eat as being carriers and spreaders? Why would they be given vaccines if they can’t spread viruses?

MONEY TAKES THE PLACE OF SCIENCE when someone says there’s no science to back the claim. There’s no science, because there was no testing. And even if they’re pressured to test, they’ll conduct the research in such a way as to obtain the results they seek = no connection.

Animal exploiting industries are the foundation of the world economies. Mess with those economies by messing with the animals they use to support those economies and the people who drive to protect those economies will mess with you.






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BEEF MAGAZINE NET NEWS

Is BVDV hiding in your herd?

BEEF MAGAZINE

TA-FC ClipBoard: BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS. 

Read on. Are you eating diseased cattle? How would you know?

“BVDV has been around pastures and feedlots a long time, and it continues to challenge herd management. Not only does it spread easily and show very few clinical signs, this complex virus continues to evolve, presenting new strains with shifting viral subtypes.”

Has the animal you’re eating been vaccinated and if so, then how harmful to humans? Do you think the ones who know would tell the truth?

I thought animals couldn’t spread viruses, didn’t you? If it was so harmless, then why the need to vaccinate against it? Ninety percent go undetected.

If it can be found in the bloodstream of cattle, then why not in the bloodstream of those who eat the blood?


Is BVDV hiding in your herd?

Learn more about this sneaky virus to improve your herd’s disease prevention protocols

Industry Voice by Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health | May 01, 2020

Up to 90% of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections are subclinical and go unnoticed. However, the most common indication of disease prevalence is poor reproductive performance, including decreased conception rates, abortions, stillbirths and weak calves. And that’s definitely something that producers pay attention to.

“BVDV not only contributes to reproductive failure, the virus causes suppression of the animal’s immune system, making it more susceptible to other diseases,” said Richard Linhart, DVM, DACT, Boehringer Ingelheim. “Between the costs associated with poor reproductive performance and the increased likelihood of cattle developing other diseases, BVDV can leave a devastating impact on all herds.”

BVDV basics

BVDV spreads easily through most livestock environments, including feed and water. It invades the animal’s respiratory and reproductive systems, spreading between heifers, cows, calves, steers and bulls. Cattle can become infected with BVDV in one of two ways:

  • Transient infections are acquired from other animals after birth. Infected cattle can shed the virus in saliva, nasal and eye discharge, urine, feces, milk and semen. These infections typically last a few weeks and are a minor source of viral shedding.
  • Persistent infections are acquired from the dam while in utero. The virus is spread through the bloodstream to the fetus. Calves that survive may have birth defects or become persistently infected (PI).

“PI calves can look sickly, or like poor-doers, but they can also look very normal, just like any other calf in the pen,” explained Dr. Linhart. “However, PI calves are born shedding tremendous amounts of the virus, and will continue to shed the virus for their entire life.”

BVDV has been around pastures and feedlots a long time, and it continues to challenge herd management. Not only does it spread easily and show very few clinical signs, this complex virus continues to evolve, presenting new strains with shifting viral subtypes.

Gain the upper hand with a sound prevention plan

There is no treatment for BVDV infections, so establishing an effective disease prevention plan is crucial. Successful prevention programs typically include each of the following management strategies:

  1. Identifying and eliminating PI calves. “It’s really important to cull PI calves, because they’re the source of ongoing infection to other animals in the herd,” Dr. Linhart stressed. In fact, between 70% and 100% of non-vaccinated or immunocompromised cattle become infected when exposed to a PI calf.1,2 Testing calves prior to 60 days of age will help identify animals that should be culled or isolated from the herd.
  2. Establishing a biosecurity program. By upholding strict biosecurity standards, producers can help prevent a BVDV wreck. Maintaining a closed herd, buying cattle from only BVDV-free herds, quarantining newly purchased cattle and sanitizing potentially contaminated objects such as stock trailers or chutes are all ways to help ensure your cattle are not exposed to the virus.
  3. Enhancing herd immunity with effective vaccinations. Vaccinating is one of the best ways to ensure cattle are protected against BVDV. “We know there are several strains of BVDV that affect cattle, and most vaccines on the market provide good protection against Type 1a and Type 2,” asserted Dr. Linhart. “However, not all vaccines are able to provide adequate protection against Type 1b, the most predominant subtype in cattle.”3

BVDV Type 1b presents a significant threat to herd health, as it accounts for nearly 69% of all BVDV-positive cattle.3 Dr. Linhart advises producers to select a vaccine specifically labeled to protect against the most common BVDV subtypes, including Type 1b.

Visit BVDVTracker.com for more information

To help producers, veterinarians and industry professionals address the challenges of this complex disease, Boehringer Ingelheim created BVDVTracker.com. Website visitors can view a complete resource library, submit an anonymous sample for testing and explore a nationwide heat map that makes it easy to identify the disease subtype(s) most prevalent in your area.

Source: Is BVDV hiding in your herd?






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BEEF MAGAZINE NET NEWS

USDA advances RFID tag program for cattle disease traceability

TA-FC ClipBoard: Currently there are thirty-nine million calves/cattle slaughtered yearly in the USA. Yet there are only eight million tags distributed. There’s no talk about how that is going to keep tabs on all the cattle, unless they tag every fourth or fifth calf in a population that’s regulated.

It sounds like Adolph Hitler tagging Jews with tattoos to keep track of them? I used to wonder why bother if they were all going to slaughter anyway? Only he knows and he’s dead.

One cow gets sick and they all get sick? So these tags are for contagious diseases, not necessarily disease caused by other factors which might just as easily sweep through a herd without actually being contagious.

That’s a lot of time, effort and money going into tagging and monitoring the tags, which isn’t covered in the article (the monitoring part). How does the tag alert authorities of impending or current disease process? How do they actually work?

How many cows have to get sick before the alarm sounds? Do tags also alert to downed cows? Can the tag tell if a cow is sick? Which symptoms does it look for?

Does the tag cover corona-type viruses as well? How? Can cows get the plaque or a version of it?

Nobody has to tag a plant, do they? I wonder though if tagging plants, every other row, interspersed, could detect viruses before they take out a whole crop?

How would you do it? I know one thing for sure, the plant wouldn’t resist.

The plant industry isn’t very good at tracking where plants came from once they end up in a produce market, when a human disease breaks out due to faulty, contaminated processing.

So are these tags really meant for tracing a cow once it’s been slaughtered, dismembered and rendered in case the flesh is tainted? You mean that tag number stays with every bit of the flesh, bone and blood till it reaches its final resting place in your gut? I don’t believe it. You mean two cows don’t get mixed up, once they’re dead and being ground or slashed and pulled apart? I don’t believe it.

Thirty-nine million cows dead yearly in the USA by human hands and those humans are worried that a few may get sick and die before they have a chance to kill them?


USDA advances RFID tag program for cattle disease traceability

APHIS awards contracts to provide cattle and bison producers with up to 8 million low-frequency RFID tags.

Aug 17, 2020

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) recently awarded contracts to purchase up to 8 million low-frequency radio frequency identification (RFID) ear tags, which will help increase overall animal disease traceability in cattle and bison.

APHIS said the contract allows it to purchase additional tags each year for up to five years.

“USDA continues its commitment to protecting our nation’s animal agriculture by increasing traceability in the cattle and bison sectors — in this case, by providing free RFID tags to interested producers,” USDA undersecretary for marketing and regulatory programs Greg Ibach said. “This will not only help offset the costs of switching to RFID tags but also help us more quickly respond to potential disease events.”

USDA believes that RFID devices will provide states and the cattle and bison industries with the best opportunity to rapidly contain the spread of high-economic impact diseases, APHIS said.

Use of RFID tags better positions the livestock industry and state and federal veterinarians to accurately and quickly trace animals exposed or infected with potentially devastating diseases before they can do substantial damage to the U.S. livestock industry, the agency said.

These RFID tags will be provided to animal health officials and will be distributed for use in replacement breeding cattle and bison at no cost to the producer, APHIS explained. RFID low-frequency official calfhood vaccination (OCV) button tags are available for brucellosis-vaccinated animals, and official “840” white button tags are available for non-vaccinated heifers.

APHIS noted that free metal “National Uniform Eartagging System” tags will remain available as USDA continues to receive comments and evaluate next steps on its proposed RFID transition timeline.

That proposal is available for review and public comment through Oct. 5, 2020.

Contracts for the RFID tags were awarded to three U.S. tag companies: Allflex, Datamars and Y-Tex. Contracting with all three manufacturers will allow USDA to procure the number of tags needed to meet an industry volume equivalent to the number of replacement heifers in the U.S., APHIS said.

As part of its overall effort to increase traceability in cattle and bison, APHIS distributed more than 1.1 million RFID tags to 38 states between January and July 2020. Each state veterinarian distributes the tags in a way that best serves their industry. For more information on availability and distribution of tags, producers can contact their state veterinarian’s office. Producers can also purchase RFID tags for their animals by contacting any of the companies approved to manufacture official identification RFID tags, APHIS said.

Source: USDA advances RFID tag program for cattle disease traceability