You Don’t Need to Fear the Estrogen Content In Impossible Burgers

CNAP ClipBoard: Tiffany Stevens the author of this article states, “So if you’re worried an occasionally meatless meal will turn you into a woman, don’t be. Instead, prove your masculinity by taming your fear of new foods.”

  • If men are worried about being turned into a woman, what do the women have to fear, being turned into a man?
  • An “occasional” meatless meal will give you a sex change? Who said anything about occasional? Meat at every meal is the deal, has been for decades. If not meat, then some animal product – milk and/or eggs are in just about everything. It’s almost like once they started using the fluids and eggs of the animals, they put them in everything. Can you imagine the obsessive compulsions directed at finding uses for animal products? Looking back it all seems pathological.
  • When you have to read a label to see if there are any animal products in the product you want to buy, that tells you that nearly everything contains animals of some sort. Otherwise you wouldn’t have to look.
  • Most of the men I see in Cleveland are fat and they all have man boobs and none of them are vegetarian or vegan. I mean, why do men have breasts in the first place? Or hadn’t anybody noticed?
  • The rapid growth hormones they get from eating animals designed to grow fast and fat is what’s responsible for their breasts being kicked into milk producing gear!!
  • Hey, if this keeps going and men keep overloading their systems with rapid growth hormones, the men will develop the capacity to become milk producing machines and be able to feed the planet! You know, how they expect the cows to give them milk? Well, now the human male with be the number one supplier. Nobody will want human female milk. MALE MILK will be in HIGH DEMAND. WE’VE GOT MALE BOOBS. Who WANTS cows when we’ve got HUMANS?
  • But wait, it’s happening to women too. Ever see so many women with super huge boobs walking around all over the planet – almost like they’re being HAND-BRED for factory farming of milk? They’re almost half their body size. And their bodies are huge too. Where did they come from? Cows, Chickens, Pigs, Lambs…that’s where. It’s because of the animals they eat, not because of plant estrogen.
  • The Republicans in the USA had nothing to do with people’s soy fears that began a long time ago. This is nothing new and the discovery was made by Asians who eat a lot of it and written up by the British. The story wasn’t about boobs. It was about decreased libido – in both men and women after they consumed tofu. It “cools the cockles”, they say – but only temporarily.
  • Cockles refers to the testicles in men – maybe women will be growing cockles too – not impossible through the evolutionary process that lots of people claim doesn’t exist. Cockles are in the mollusk family and the shape resembles testicles.
  • I never thought it a good idea to have sex after a meal. We’d have sex first, then go out to wine and dine. Much more fun and relaxing that way, rather than hardly enjoying the meal with sex on our minds – this way we had the best of both worlds.

Tiffany Stevens

MyRecipes January 15, 2020

Between Beyond Meat, Impossible Foods, and other emerging plant-based meat companies, it’s never been a better time to be a vegetarian or vegan. Nor has it ever been easier to cut back on meat consumption in general, for the sake of your health and for the sake of the planet. Diners who want to occasionally sub an Angus patty for a plant-based one can now find those options in a number of restaurants, including Burger King, which added the Impossible Whopper to its menu in the fall of 2019.

New food technology can sometimes spark unnecessary fears among eaters, however, especially when a new food product is seen as unnatural or weird. Take, for example, the recent rumors warning consumers to beware the estrogen content in Impossible Whoppers and other Impossible Food products, lest the delicious, meat-free burgers cause men eating them to grow breasts.

Fears about soy products feminizing men have existed for quite a while. The Impossible Burger fear mongering, however, is a bit more recent. It stems from a 2019 story published by Tri-State Livestock News, a trade publication covering livestock agriculture.

Written by James Stangle, who specializes in veterinary medicine, the story claims that four Impossible Whoppers a day contain “enough estrogen to grow boobs on a male.” That story was then picked up by conversative pundits such as Michael Savage, according to The Washington Post.

It seems silly to point out that few people, if any, are buying and consuming four Impossible Whoppers daily. But even if a man did decide to eat Impossible Whoppers for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and a snack between, he needn’t worry about developing feminine secondary sex characteristics.

For starters, the compound contained in Impossible Burgers isn’t human estrogen at all—it’s phytoestrogen, a plant isoflavone that acts similarly to human estrogen, but doesn’t have nearly the same strength, according to Insider.

Phytoestrogen, which is often found in soy, can promote the effects of naturally occurring estrogen, which exists in all humans. But it can also suppress it, since it has both estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects. How phytoestrogen affects you depends on what your existing estrogen levels are as well as other individual biological factors.

Regardless of whether it promotes or decreases the effects of naturally occurring estrogen, however, it still doesn’t have the strength to grow breasts in men.

Although Stangle didn’t include this citation in his piece, it seems his claims may have stemmed from a single case in which a Texas man in 2008 developed “breasts and breast soreness” from drinking three quarts of soy milk a day, according to Snopes. Those effects went away after he stopped ingesting that extreme amount of soy milk regularly. This isolated case from 12 years ago might be shocking, but it’s not enough evidence to sound the alarm on soy products in general.

The validity of the feminization fears surrounding soy products is also belied by the number of countries that rely on soy products; a plethora of Asian countries have been using soy beans for centuries without men in those societies suffering adverse or unexpected biological effects.

It’s worth pointing out that the feminization fears behind the Impossible Whopper estrogen rumors are inherently tied to sexism, homophobia and transphobia in some circles. Meat eating is also connected, in some men’s mind, to masculinity; the idea of eating a veggie burger amounts to an assault on their very identity. There’s nothing to fear from eating a plant-based burger, however; a bite of a charbroiled soy product won’t take away anyone’s man-card.

So if you’re worried an occasionally meatless meal will turn you into a woman, don’t be. Instead, prove your masculinity by taming your fear of new foods.

Source: You Don’t Need to Fear the Estrogen Content In Impossible Burgers






Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have a new foe in the plant-based burger wars: the Ultimate Burger

Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have a new foe in the plant-based burger wars: the Ultimate Burger

Brian Sozzi

It’s ultimately not meat. But the Conagra Brands-owned Gardein brand hopes its new plant-based Ultimate Burger wins over Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods loyalists in 2020.

Gardein, acquired in Conagra’s 2018 acquisition of Pinnacle Foods, will release the next iteration of the Ultimate Burger in January. The burger is a mixture of soy and pea protein, assorted spices and canola oil. It will join several other plant-based Gardein products currently on the market, such as fishless fish and meatless meatballs (using the same proteins). The “Ultimate” label will also be used on a line of spicy sausage and hot dogs.

Wrapped in sleek brown packaging, the Ultimate Burger scores big on overall value: a six-pack of burgers will go for $11.99. A two-pack of Beyond Meat burgers could set you back about $5.99.

The notorious five pound Impossible Foods “brick” can go for upwards of $250.

A Conagra spokesperson says the Ultimate Burger will quickly reach supermarkets and restaurants given its extensive network of ingredient suppliers.

Ultimate burgerIt’s not surprising to see Conagra go all-in on plant-based foods. Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have created a surging market, fueled by great-tasting plant-based products and new deals at restaurant chains such as Burger King and McDonald’s.

The meat alternative category has hauled in $957 million in sales for the 52-weeks ended November 2, up 10% year-over-year, according to Nielsen. Within this category, the meatless burger business has seen $272 million in sales, up 11.4% from a year ago.

Brian Sozzi is an editor-at-large and co-anchor of The First Trade at Yahoo Finance. Follow him on Twitter @BrianSozzi

Source: Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have a new foe in the plant-based burger wars: the Ultimate Burger






 

IMPOSSIBLE WHOPPER

This is the burger everybody’s been talking about and quite frankly, compared to the other Impossible Burgers I’ve had this hardly resembled it.

There are two ways you can order this burger at Burger King cooked: either flame broiled, or microwaved for those who don’t want their burger cooked on the same surface an animal patty was cooked. I chose flame broiled, since I’m not into that two kitchen thing that observant Jews do: one for flesh and one for milk, cheese and eggs, since it’s against their religious beliefs to have them touch each other.

I ordered it flame broiled, but it didn’t taste nor texture like what I’ve had in the past, which could only mean they microwaved it.

It was also thinner, much thinner and drier, so I’m surmising the people at Impossible Foods took the animal patty and made a close replica of it. Evidently not all Impossible burgers are equal.

The girl doing the cooking in the back didn’t know what vegan meant when the guy up front asked her if the mayo was vegan. The up front guy had to look on a small packet of mayonnaise and he couldn’t see it, so I looked and immediately saw contains egg. He said I was so rapid that I gave him a headache.

The guy assured me there was no animal in the bun, but who knows.

There was only one other person in the store eating and it looked like it was closed from the outside. It also looked like they were trying to save on electricity. Dark inside, dark outside. It was a freaky experience. I was happy to get back on the bus into familiar territory.

It tasted like a whopper. The burgers I recall from fast food decades ago were pretty dry. It was all the goop on them that made them taste good.






 

Where’s the beef? For Impossible Foods it’s in boosting burger sales and raising hundreds of millions

Where’s the beef?

For Impossible Foods it’s in boosting burger sales and raising hundreds of millions

Jonathan Shieber,TechCrunch Tue, Apr 3 5:38 PM EDT

Any company that’s looking to replace the more than 5 billion pounds of ground beef making its way onto tables in the U.S. every year with a meatless substitute is going to need a lot of cash.

It’s a big vision with lots of implications for the world — from climate change and human health to challenging the massive, multi-billion dollar industries that depend on meat — and luckily for Impossible Foods (one of the many companies looking to supplant the meat business globally), the company has managed to attract big-name investors with incredibly deep pockets to fund its meatless mission.

In the seven years since the company raised its first $7 million investment from Khosla Ventures, Impossible Foods has managed to amass another $389 million in financing — most recently in the form of a convertible note from the Singaporean global investment powerhouse Temasek (which is backed by the Singaporean government) and the Chinese investment fund Sailing Capital (a state-owned investment fund backed by the Communist Party-owned Chinese financial services firm, Shanghai International Group).

“Part of the reason why we did this as a convertible note is that we knew we would increase our valuation with the launch of our business,” says David Lee, Impossible Foods chief operating officer. “We closed $114 million in the last 18 months.” The company raised its last equity round of $108 million in September 2015.

Lee declined to comment on the company’s path to profitability, valuation or revenues.

Impossible began selling its meat substitute back in 2016 with a series of launches at some of America’s fanciest restaurants in conjunction with the country’s most celebrated young chefs.David Chang (of Momofuku fame in New York) and Traci Des Jardins of Jardiniére and Chris Cosentino of Cockscomb signed on in San Francisco, as well as Tal Ronnen of Crossroads in Los Angeles.”When we launched a year ago, we were producing out of a pilot facility,” says Impossible co-founder Pat Brown. [Now] we have a full-fledged production facility producing 2.5 million pounds per month at the end of the year.”

The new facility, which opened in Oakland last year, has its work cut out for it. Impossible has plans to expand to Asia this year and is now selling its meat in more than 1,000 restaurants around the U.S.Some would argue that the meat substitute has found its legs in the fast-casual restaurant chains that now dot the country, serving up mass-marketed, higher price point gourmet burgers. Restaurants including FatBurger, Umami Burger, Hopdoddy, The Counter, Gott’s and B Spot — the Midwest burger restaurant owned by Chef Michael Symon — all hawk Impossible’s meat substitute in an increasing array of combinations.

“When we started looking at what Pat and the team at Impossible was doing we saw a perfect fit with the values and mission that Impossible has to drive a stronger mindset around what it is to be conscientious about what is going on,” says Umami Burger chief executive Daniel del Olmo.Since launching their first burger collaboration last year, Umami Burger has sold more than 200,000 Impossible Burgers. “Once people tried the burger they couldn’t believe that it was not meat,” says del Olmo. “They immediately understood that it was a product that they could crave. We are seeing 38 percent increase in traffic leading to 18 percent sales growth [since selling the burger].

“At $13 a pop, the Impossible Umami Burger is impossible for most American families to afford, but pursuing the higher end of the market was always the initial goal for Impossible’s founder, Patrick Brown.

A former Stanford University professor and a serial entrepreneur in the organic food space (try his non-dairy yogurts and cheeses!), Brown is taking the same path that Elon Musk used to bring electric vehicles to the market. If higher-end customers with discerning palates can buy into meatless burgers that taste like burgers, then the spending can subsidize growth (along with a few hundred million from investors) to create economics that will become more favorable as the company scales up to sell its goods at a lower price point.

Brown recognizes that 2.5 million pounds of meat substitute is no match for a 5 billion-pound ground-beef juggernaut, but it is, undeniably, a start. And as long as the company can boost sales for the companies selling its patties, the future looks pretty bright. “To get to scale you have to sell to a higher price-point,” says Brown.That approach was the opposite tack from Beyond Meat, perhaps the only other well-funded competitor for the meatless crown. Beyond Meat is selling through grocery stores like Whole Foods, in addition to partnerships of its…

FINISH READING: Where’s the beef? For Impossible Foods it’s in boosting burger sales and raising hundreds of millions







 

The Impossible Burger – update

This is one popular burger. Everybody wants it. Even burger joints that sell only animal meat want it. Fortunately for me several locations all at once, near enough so I could get to them, started putting it on their menus.

We ordered it at Earth Bistro in Cleveland, a restaurant that makes everything they serve on the menu vegan-friendly. Can be made vegan.

Probably, but I don’t know for sure, most burger eaters like their burgers medium rare. This was my experience with The Impossible Burger.

Yes, it had a blood taste, but it textured too soft. It seemed barely cooked, barely even warm. In fact the bun was warmer than the burger.

Steve felt like I did. It was okay as far as burgers that bleed go, but he likes his burgers well done. So do I.

When speaking to the owner, he said of course they were still learning to work with it, and that if cooked beyond a certain temperature, it stiffens considerably according to the instructions.

I’m not sure if they actually wasted one by experimenting with it, but you really need to do that.

Firming this burger up, allowing for a longer cook time so when it gets to the customer it is still hot is important.

It wasn’t cohesive enough, and of course it plopped out the sides of the sandwich when I bit into it, more like a chicken salad only made with a burger.

The Impossible Burger is too fragile. Not wanting to lose a burger, cooks are so afraid to go beyond the temperature suggested, that they undercook it. That’s my take on it.

Tighten it up and don’t be afraid to add a little salt.

I won’t order another one until it’s improved. I certainly do appreciate the effort that went into the development of this burger. I look forward to the new and improved IMPOSSIBLE BURGER – maybe a separate one that’s well done. Two varieties: Medium rare – well done.


UPDATE on 7 March 2018

I posted my short review of THE IMPOSSIBLE BURGER onto THE IMPOSSIBLE BURGER Facebook Page. This was there response:

Impossible Foods Thank you for reaching out, Sharon! We’re sorry to hear that your experience didn’t meet your expectations. We’re always working to improve, and we really appreciate your feedback. 👍

If you decide to give the Impossible Burger another go, we’d recommend requesting that it be prepared more well-done. Everyone likes their burgers cooked differently, but we enjoy a medium well preparation of our product.”

My Comment > So, it can be cooked longer than the chef cooked it. Cooks and chefs all over should know this. Like the person from Impossible Foods said, they enjoy a medium-well, which probably is perfect. I will try it again and make my requests and report back. Thank you to IMPOSSIBLE FOODS for clearing that up for me – and anybody else who experienced the same problem.

 






 

Impossible Burger Rolls Out In Universities And Cafeterias

Plant-based burger takeover in 3,2,1! Food technology company Impossible Foods, the makers of the Impossible Burger just recently announced their vegan burger is moving into university, company caf…

Plant-based burger takeover in 3,2,1! Food technology company Impossible Foods, the makers of the Impossible Burger just recently announced their vegan burger is moving into university, company cafeterias, and cultural venues!

The rollout is being coordinated with Bon Appétit Management Company, which run more than 1,000 cafes for universities, corporations, and museums in 33 states, according to FoodDive. Impossible Foods is also working with Restaurant Associates, which operate 160 foodservice locations, such as museums and performing arts centers. The tasty burger is expected to be in retail outlets in the near future, at prices competitive with beef. We can’t wait!

According to Bloomberg, food service represents about half of U.S. ground beef consumption. So for the Impossible Burger, a plant-based “beef” patty that cooks, smells, tastes, and even “bleeds” like real meat to be introduced into the food service arena is a huge step. “For us to have the impact, we have to appeal to meat consumers — and that’s been the target from day one,” Nick Halla, chief strategy officer of Impossible Foods, told Food Dive.

What’s more, the Impossible Burger, like other plant-based meats, is also environmentally superior to conventional burgers. According to the company, their burger uses 99 percent less land, 85 percent less water, and emits 89 percent less greenhouse gas than traditional beef production. Considering the animal agriculture industry is responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions than the entire transportation sector, these are not just impressive statistics, they are characteristics of a product that may just save the planet!

READ ON: The Plant-Based Impossible Burger Is Rolling Out in More Universities and Company Cafeterias! | One Green Planet






 

The All-Vegan Impossible Burger Will Be Everywhere Soon 

From One Green Planet:

The Impossible Burger has just opened a new production facility. Welcome to the future of food.

Since the Impossible Burger’s debut on the meat-centric menu of restaurateur David Chang’s Momofuku Nishi, Impossible Foods’ premier product has continued to gain momentum. Every day, hungry customers would line up outside Momofuku Nishi waiting to get a taste of  the vegan “burger that bleeds.” Thanks to an innovative combination of wheat and potato protein, coconut oil, and heme, an iron-rich compound, the Impossible Burger is closer to the real thing than any other burger. No matter if they were vegan, vegetarian, or meat-eater — everyone wanted to experience how true to the taste and texture of a beef patty the Impossible Burger truly was.

Shortly after, the Impossible Burger was added to the menu of several high-end restaurants, each with their own interpretation of how to serve it. Most recently, Bareburger, an organic restaurant chain with 44 locations in five countries, added the Impossible Burger at one of their NYC locations with plans to expand to other U.S. locations, offering a customizable experience and bringing the meat-free burger that tastes like the real thing even closer to mainstream consumers. Bareburger CEO and co-founder Euripides Pelekanos told Fortune that unlike other vegan burgers, the Impossible Burger is “geared toward meat eaters,” continuing, “It’s not going to live as [a] veggie burger on the menu. It’s going to live side-by-side with the beef burger.” At a time when more people than ever are cutting back on meat consumption, the plant-based Impossible Burger is giving consumers something that has been missing up until now: a meatless option that is practically indistinguishable from the real thing.

However, the success of the Impossible Burger at high-end restaurants was only the beginning. Rather than settle for being the sole vegan burger option, Impossible Foods’ CEO Patrick Brown is looking to make the burger that bleeds the new norm at every burger chain. And now, a future where even more Americans can pick up the Impossible Burger from a local restaurant is closer than most of us thought possible. Impossible Foods just cut the ribbon on a large-scale production facility located in Oakland, California.

As reported by The Good Food Institute, the facility will allow Impossible Foods to increase their production capacity from enough burgers to supply only eight restaurants to enough for 1,000 restaurants. That’s at least one million pounds of meatless meat per month (enough to make four million burgers), which is 250 percent more than their current capacity, according to a report by Yahoo! Finance. The entire game is about to change. But what makes this burger so different from the prepackaged veggie burgers we’re already familiar with?…

Finish reading: The All-Vegan Impossible Burger Will Be Everywhere Soon | One Green Planet