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BEYOND MEAT IMPOSSIBLE FOODS NET NEWS

Impossible Foods CEO slams ‘the most destructive technology on Earth by far’

Impossible Foods CEO slams ‘the most destructive technology on Earth by far’

Daniel Howley

Technology Editor

January 8, 2020, 1:27 PM EST

Impossible Foods unveils plant-based pork and sausage

Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown is bringing the heat to CES 2020 in Las Vegas, America’s biggest consumer tech trade show. The head of the plant-based meat company not only debuted two new products, a ground pork and pork sausage alternative, but slammed the meat industry in an interview with Yahoo Finance, calling it “the most destructive technology on Earth by far.”

The company’s ultimate goal is to completely replace animals as a form of food by 2035.

Impossible Foods already offers a beef alternative in its Impossible Burger, which uses plants and includes a soy-based heme protein, which gives the burger the faux blood that makes it “bleed.”

The new sausage offering goes on sale in January at 139 Burger King locations in various test markets across the U.S. There’s no word on availability for the ground pork offering just yet.

Impossible’s latest move comes as the fake meat wars continue to heat up. The company’s biggest competitor, Beyond Meat (BYND), went public in 2019 and saw its stock skyrocket from its IPO price of $25 all the way to $234 in July, before settling back down to $83.89 on Tuesday.

On Tuesday, Impossible told Reuters it’s no longer seeking a deal to supply McDonald’s (MCD) with its Impossible burger due to supply constraints. Beyond Meat’s shares jumped on the news.

Holding the meat industry’s feet to the fire

With beef and pork alternatives already on the table, Brown says that chicken and turkey alternatives, as well as other plant-based meat options, are on the way.

Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown holds up an Impossible Burger 2.0, the new and improved version of the company’s plant-based vegan burger that tastes like real beef, at a press event during CES 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada on January 7, 2019. – (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP)

“Again the thing that you just have to remember to anticipate everything Impossible is going to do is that our intention is to completely replace animals as a food production technology, the most destructive technology on Earth by far,” Brown said. “And that means that any product that we’re currently producing using animals, Impossible Foods is already working on, and will commercialize a plant-based, a better, more delicious, more affordable, vastly more sustainable version of that product.”

Brown’s claims of the impact of the meat industry on the environment aren’t unfounded. There have been several studies linking meat to everything from climate change to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Which is why, he says, Impossible Foods is so important.

Beyond Meat offers a similar reason for its products’ existence, naming the meat industry’s impact on the environment as an example of why plant-based alternatives are necessary.

“It’s a very important problem to solve,” Brown said. “Pork production is actually a big public health issue, because there are actually more antibiotics fed to pork, to pigs, than to all humans. It’s a major source of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.”

While there’s been a lot of discussion about the meat industry’s impact on climate change through methane produced by farm animals, Brown says Impossible Foods is focusing on more than just how the climate itself is affected.

“Of course, it’s not just about climate, it’s about global biodiversity, it’s about water resources, water pollution, and so forth,” Brown said. The nutritional impact of plant-based meat alternatives has also been a major sticking point for the companies. And while they have a lower amount of saturated fat than their animal-based counterparts, plant-based burgers like Impossible’s do have more sodium than beef.

But Impossible’s pork products won’t help anyone if they don’t taste good. Fortunately, for Brown, after I tried a soft-shell corn taco with the company’s ground pork offering, I can report that the taste of Impossible Foods’ faux pork is as close to the real thing as you can get.

It’s not dry, and even browns similar to pork. If I didn’t know it was plant-based, I wouldn’t have been able to tell the difference. In our own Yahoo Finance taste test last fall, Impossible’s burger outshined Beyond’s by a slim margin.

As for the pork, we’ll just have to wait and see how the rest of the world feels…

Source: Impossible Foods CEO slams ‘the most destructive technology on Earth by far’






Categories
NET NEWS

Arby’s Debuts “Meat-Based Vegetables” and Social Media is Not Having It

AFC NOTES: Arby’s thinks they’re being funny, but there’s nothing funny about animals forced to suffer unspeakable pain and terror.

Unlike the plant-based burgers that actually taste like meat, Arby’s so-called carrots are nothing more than turkey hot dogs. There was no effort put into making them taste like a plant. Instead of shaping the turkey sausage or hot dog equally from end to end, they made a wedge shape of it, colored it orange, stuck a piece of parsley in the top and called it a carrot.

Arby’s better be careful calling an animal a plant. Vegan companies are being forced to drop name references to traditionally animal-based foods or be sued. It’s time to sue Arby’s for calling a turkey hot dog a carrot.



ARBY’S DEBUTS “MEAT-BASED VEGETABLES” AND SOCIAL MEDIA IS NOT HAVING IT

After vowing to never add the Impossible Burger to its menu, Arby’s has created a new concept that pokes fun at the booming plant-based meat industry. And many social media users are not pleased.

by ANNA STAROSTINETSKAYA

JUNE 26, 2019

Today, fast-food chain Arby’s—known for its slogan “we have the meats”—unveiled a new marketing concept: “megetables,” or plants made out of meat. The idea was created in response to the rapid growth of plant-based meat—made by companies such as Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods—on fast-food menus. “People love meat already. What Americans have a harder time doing is enjoying vegetables,” Arby’s Chief Marketing Officer Jim Taylor told Fast Company. “So we said, ‘If they can make meat out of vegetables, why can’t we make vegetables out of meat?’

We’re going to introduce to the world a category we call ‘megetables’—we’ve applied for trademark. Our first vegetable is going to be the marrot.” The “marrot”—turkey that is shaped into a carrot—may be sold for a limited time based on customer response, which, evidenced by commenters on Facebook, is skewing negative.

“Imagine being this insecure about the fate of your industry. Go with the flow, my friends, you’re not doing yourselves any favors fighting the inevitable,” user Alex Perez said.

In May, Arby’s made a public statement about its stance on plant-based meat options. “Arby’s is not one of the restaurant companies interested in working with Impossible Foods,” the company said. “The chances we will bring plant-based menu items to our restaurants, now or in the future, are absolutely impossible.”

Commenter Hooper Brown responded, stating, “Wow, such a strong moral position to take. I’m so thankful Arby’s has committed to have its head in the sand. I hope to quote this again in a few years when shareholders change their mind.”

Many commenters on Facebook were confused about the chain being so opposed to adding plant-based meat (“Don’t seek out foes where there’s nothing but allies and money to be made,” Felix Chesire Thompson commented), with some pointing out that foot traffic at Burger King locations that offer the Impossible Whopper has increased by 18.5 percent.

Photo Credit: Arby’s

Source: Arby’s Debuts “Meat-Based Vegetables” and Social Media is Not Having It | VegNews






 

Categories
BURGER KING IMPOSSIBLE FOODS NET NEWS

Behold the Beefless ‘Impossible Whopper’

By Nathaniel Popper

Photographs and Video by Matt Edge

OAKLAND, Calif. — Would you like that Whopper with or without beef?

This week, Burger King is introducing a version of its iconic Whopper sandwich filled with a vegetarian patty from the start-up Impossible Foods.

The Impossible Whopper, as it will be known, is the biggest validation — and expansion opportunity — for a young industry that is looking to mimic and replace meat with plant-based alternatives.

Impossible Foods and its competitors in Silicon Valley have already had some mainstream success. The vegetarian burger made by Beyond Meat has been available at over a thousand Carl’s Jr. restaurants since January and the company is now moving toward an initial public offering.

White Castle has sold a slider version of the Impossible burger in its 380 or so stores since late last year.

But a national rollout at Burger King’s 7,200 locations would dwarf those previous announcements and more than double the total number of locations where Impossible’s burgers are available…






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BEYOND MEAT BURGER KING IMPOSSIBLE FOODS TEST PRODUCT REVIEWS

The Impossible Burger – update

This is one popular burger. Everybody wants it. Even burger joints that sell only animal meat want it. Fortunately for me several locations all at once, near enough so I could get to them, started putting it on their menus.

We ordered it at Earth Bistro in Cleveland, a restaurant that makes everything they serve on the menu vegan-friendly. Can be made vegan.

Probably, but I don’t know for sure, most burger eaters like their burgers medium rare. This was my experience with The Impossible Burger.

Yes, it had a blood taste, but it textured too soft. It seemed barely cooked, barely even warm. In fact the bun was warmer than the burger.

Steve felt like I did. It was okay as far as burgers that bleed go, but he likes his burgers well done. So do I.

When speaking to the owner, he said of course they were still learning to work with it, and that if cooked beyond a certain temperature, it stiffens considerably according to the instructions.

I’m not sure if they actually wasted one by experimenting with it, but you really need to do that.

Firming this burger up, allowing for a longer cook time so when it gets to the customer it is still hot is important.

It wasn’t cohesive enough, and of course it plopped out the sides of the sandwich when I bit into it, more like a chicken salad only made with a burger.

The Impossible Burger is too fragile. Not wanting to lose a burger, cooks are so afraid to go beyond the temperature suggested, that they undercook it. That’s my take on it.

Tighten it up and don’t be afraid to add a little salt.

I won’t order another one until it’s improved. I certainly do appreciate the effort that went into the development of this burger. I look forward to the new and improved IMPOSSIBLE BURGER – maybe a separate one that’s well done. Two varieties: Medium rare – well done.


UPDATE on 7 March 2018

I posted my short review of THE IMPOSSIBLE BURGER onto THE IMPOSSIBLE BURGER Facebook Page. This was there response:

Impossible Foods Thank you for reaching out, Sharon! We’re sorry to hear that your experience didn’t meet your expectations. We’re always working to improve, and we really appreciate your feedback. 👍

If you decide to give the Impossible Burger another go, we’d recommend requesting that it be prepared more well-done. Everyone likes their burgers cooked differently, but we enjoy a medium well preparation of our product.”

My Comment > So, it can be cooked longer than the chef cooked it. Cooks and chefs all over should know this. Like the person from Impossible Foods said, they enjoy a medium-well, which probably is perfect. I will try it again and make my requests and report back. Thank you to IMPOSSIBLE FOODS for clearing that up for me – and anybody else who experienced the same problem.

 






 

Categories
I WANT

WHITE COFFEE

I want white coffee.

Take the black/brown color out of coffee. I’m not talking about milk here.

An animal doesn’t have to be enslaved, tortured and slaughtered do they?

Black/brown coffee stains my teeth. Buying teeth whitener is expensive and may be harmful.

I want white coffee beans – at least cream color – off white.

If possible.






 

Categories
IMPOSSIBLE FOODS

The All-Vegan Impossible Burger Will Be Everywhere Soon 

From One Green Planet:

The Impossible Burger has just opened a new production facility. Welcome to the future of food.

Since the Impossible Burger’s debut on the meat-centric menu of restaurateur David Chang’s Momofuku Nishi, Impossible Foods’ premier product has continued to gain momentum. Every day, hungry customers would line up outside Momofuku Nishi waiting to get a taste of  the vegan “burger that bleeds.” Thanks to an innovative combination of wheat and potato protein, coconut oil, and heme, an iron-rich compound, the Impossible Burger is closer to the real thing than any other burger. No matter if they were vegan, vegetarian, or meat-eater — everyone wanted to experience how true to the taste and texture of a beef patty the Impossible Burger truly was.

Shortly after, the Impossible Burger was added to the menu of several high-end restaurants, each with their own interpretation of how to serve it. Most recently, Bareburger, an organic restaurant chain with 44 locations in five countries, added the Impossible Burger at one of their NYC locations with plans to expand to other U.S. locations, offering a customizable experience and bringing the meat-free burger that tastes like the real thing even closer to mainstream consumers. Bareburger CEO and co-founder Euripides Pelekanos told Fortune that unlike other vegan burgers, the Impossible Burger is “geared toward meat eaters,” continuing, “It’s not going to live as [a] veggie burger on the menu. It’s going to live side-by-side with the beef burger.” At a time when more people than ever are cutting back on meat consumption, the plant-based Impossible Burger is giving consumers something that has been missing up until now: a meatless option that is practically indistinguishable from the real thing.

However, the success of the Impossible Burger at high-end restaurants was only the beginning. Rather than settle for being the sole vegan burger option, Impossible Foods’ CEO Patrick Brown is looking to make the burger that bleeds the new norm at every burger chain. And now, a future where even more Americans can pick up the Impossible Burger from a local restaurant is closer than most of us thought possible. Impossible Foods just cut the ribbon on a large-scale production facility located in Oakland, California.

As reported by The Good Food Institute, the facility will allow Impossible Foods to increase their production capacity from enough burgers to supply only eight restaurants to enough for 1,000 restaurants. That’s at least one million pounds of meatless meat per month (enough to make four million burgers), which is 250 percent more than their current capacity, according to a report by Yahoo! Finance. The entire game is about to change. But what makes this burger so different from the prepackaged veggie burgers we’re already familiar with?…

Finish reading: The All-Vegan Impossible Burger Will Be Everywhere Soon | One Green Planet