Taxing red meat would save many lives, research shows

Taxing red meat would save many lives, research shows

The cost of bacon and sausages would double if the harm they cause to people’s health was taken into account

Damian Carrington Environment editor Tue 6 Nov 2018 13.00 EST Last modified on Tue 6 Nov 2018 14.00 EST


A ‘sin tax’ on meat products such as beef, lamb and pork is inevitable in the longer term, say some experts. Taxing red meat would save many lives and raise billions to pay for healthcare, according to new research. It found the cost of processed meat such as bacon and sausages would double if the harm they cause to people’s health was taken into account.

Governments already tax harmful products to reduce their consumption, such as sugar, alcohol and tobacco. With growing evidence of the health and environmental damage resulting from red meat, some experts now believe a “sin tax” on beef, lamb and pork is inevitable in the longer term.

The World Health Organization declared processed red meat to be a carcinogen in 2015, and unprocessed red meat such as steaks and chops to be a probable carcinogen. However, people in rich nations eat more than the recommended amount of red meat, which is also linked to heart disease, strokes and diabetes.

The new research looked at the level of tax needed to reflect the healthcare costs incurred when people eat red meat. It found that a 20% tax on unprocessed red meat and a 110% tax on the more harmful processed products across rich nations, with lower taxes in less wealthy nations, would cut annual deaths by 220,000 and raise $170bn (£130bn)…

FINISH READING: Taxing red meat would save many lives, research shows | Environment | The Guardian


ALSO:  PETA SUPPORTS TAXING MEAT


 





 

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Inventively, PETA became a shareholder in Hermès to confront it about its use of exotic skins

Last June, the animal rights group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) released the gruesome details of an investigation into farms in the US and Zimbabwe that were cutting crocodiles and alligators open while still alive to harvest their highly valued skins. Those skins, it says, were destined for French luxury house Hermès. (The brand didn’t deny the charges, but called it an “isolated irregularity” missed by audits designed to prevent such practices.)

About a month later, to put pressure on the company to stop using such suppliers, PETA employed an unusual tactic: The group, known for its showy protests, bought shares of Hermès International on the Paris stock exchange to voice its views as an Hermès shareholder.

Yesterday (May 31), PETA showed exactly how it is putting those shares to use. PETA representatives attended the Hermès annual shareholders’ meeting in Paris, and the animal rights group used the opportunity to publicly confront Hermès CEO Axel Dumas.

In front of hundreds of shareholders and the press, a PETA France spokeswoman, Isabelle Goetz, read out allegations of cruelty to animals. “Will Hermès some day stop using exotic skins?” she asked Dumas and other board members, according to AFP.

 

Finish reading: Inventively, PETA became a shareholder in Hermès to confront it about its use of exotic skins — Quartz