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MorningStar Farms (Kelloggs) Net News

Why Kellogg’s MorningStar Farms is going 100% plant based | Food Dive

 

Q&A

Why Kellogg’s MorningStar Farms is going 100% plant based

AUTHOR

Lillianna Byington@lil_byington

PUBLISHED

March 13, 2019

As the plant-based trend spreads, Kellogg is using its MorningStar Farms business to move forward as a leader in the space.

At Natural Products Expo West last week, the legacy veggie protein brand launched a new vegan “Cheezeburger” and announced its commitment for its portfolio to be 100% vegan by 2021.

The new promise will allow Kellogg to expand the accessibility of its plant-based products and reduce its use of more than 300 million egg whites a year. MorningStar Farms’ full product line includes Falafel, Meat Lovers, Veggie Lovers and Tex-Mex burgers as well as Chik’n nuggets and patties. But they aren’t stopping there.

Melissa Cash, head of global marketing, strategy and innovation for plant-based protein and natural brands at Kellogg, talked to Food Dive at Expo West about how the brand plans to launch more plant-based products in the coming years, why they chose this new vegan burger and how more consumers are shifting their tastes to plant-based products.

This interview has been edited for clarity and brevity…

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Food Processing News

Plant Protein Popularity Picks Up

Plant Protein Popularity Picks Up

Plant sources of proteins possess some benefits over animal-sourced ingredients. However, how do they stack up nutritionally?

By Claudia O’Donnell, Contributing Editor

Oct 06, 2016

Do you want to live a healthy, happy 100 years or longer? Author Dan Buettner’s books The Blue Zones and The Blue Zones Solutions delve into the lifestyles and beliefs of five populations documented to have some of the highest concentration of centenarians in the world.

The populations, whether located in Sardinia, Italy; Okinawa, Japan; Nicoya, Costa Rica; or Loma Linda, Calif., have key elements in common. They include social connections, physical movement, certain attitudes and beliefs and, yes, diets.

Blue Zone diets are not vegetarian. Meat was consumed, although in small portions of three to four ounces some five times a month on average. The diets were, however, plant-based, often with a focus on beans.

Interest in plant foods, including as a protein source, has been increasing. In an April 2016 Packaged Facts National Consumer Survey, 42 percent of consumers said high protein was “especially important” in choosing foods to eat, says Research Director David Sprinkle. More specifically, a February 2016 Packaged Facts report “Food Formulation and Ingredient Trends: Plant Proteins” found 43.2 percent of U.S. consumers said they somewhat or strongly agreed that they sought out vegetarian sources of proteins. This fell to 28 percent of those 35 and older, Sprinkle notes.

Drivers behind this trend extend beyond personal health to include ethical considerations. The globe’s population is predicted to grow from 7.4 billion to over 9 billion in less than 24 years. With some countries already struggling to feed significant segments of their population, the expectation is that as the mouths to feed on earth increase and irrigable land decreases, food insecurity will increase. Additionally, animal welfare and agricultural practices (environmental health) are important for many…

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Food Processing News

Product Focus: Plant Protein

Product Focus: Plant Protein

As protein becomes more sought-out by consumers, many manufacturers are infusing select products with a wide range of plant proteins.

Jan 22, 2018

Protein is one of the most sought-out nutrients by today’s consumers. With many trying to increase their intake of plant-based foods, varied plant proteins, ranging from pseudo-grains such as flax, hemp and quinoa to pulses and nuts, are finding their way into dairy alternatives, beverages, baked goods and snack foods.

The International Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation’s 2017 Annual Food and Health Survey showed 73% of shoppers view plant proteins as healthy, as compared to only 38% for animal protein. And while less than 2% of shoppers view plant protein as unhealthy, this is how 10% characterize protein from animal sources.

This is fueling more innovation with plant proteins; however, one of the challenges that product developer’s face is masking their often beany, grainy or green flavor profiles. Product developers often find that plant protein blends work best. For example, in the beverage sector, Califia Farms, Bakersfield, Calif., reformulated and extended its line of Protein Almondmilk to now offer 8g of protein per serving, which is comparable in protein content to an 8-oz. glass of dairy milk. The protein comes from rice, peas and maca root powder. The line includes Maca-‘Nilla (vanilla and cardamom), Choc-A-Maca (chocolate) and Maca-Spresso (coffee). Emeryville, Calif.-based Rebbl now offers Cold-Brew Protein. A 12-oz bottle contains 12g of protein from peas and sunflowers in a coconut milk and cold-brew coffee base…

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