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Beyond Meat Food Processing News

Beyond Meat Loses in North, Wins in South

Beyond Meat Loses in North, Wins in South

By Pan Demetrakakes, Senior Editor

Jan 31, 2020

Beyond Meat got hit with bad news in the Great White North, but took a big step forward in the South.

The meat-analogue company had been providing plant-based breakfast sausage patties and hamburgers to Tim Horton’s, the Canadian fast food chain. Horton’s started a test market in May, and by summer, Beyond Meat hamburgers were sold at Horton’s nationwide, and sausage patties at 4,000 locations.

But enthusiasm waned, and Horton’s started scaling back its Beyond Meat offerings, eventually confining them to restaurants in Ontario and British Columbia. The company announced earlier this month that those locations will also stop selling Beyond products.

“Ultimately, our guests choose to stay with the meat option in their breakfast sandwiches,” a spokesperson for Horton’s parent company told Canadian Manufacturing.

On the other hand, Beyond Meat scored a coup with KFC in Tennessee and North Carolina. It will start supplying plant-based fried chicken analogues to dozens of restaurants in the Nashville and Charlotte areas. The nugget-like product is about 80 calories apiece.

KFC did a one-day test of the nuggets in August at a store in suburban Atlanta, which sold out in less than five hours. Stores in Nashville and Charlotte will start selling the product in February.

Source: Beyond Meat Loses in North, Wins in South






 

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BURGER KING Daiya Dairy Free Follow Your Heart Non-Dairy Impossible Foods Net News TEST PRODUCT REVIEWS Tofutti

Lawsuit claims Burger King’s Impossible Whoppers are contaminated by meat

CNAP RESPONSE: Burger King’s claim that The Impossible Whopper is 100% Whopper and 0% beef is not true.

It can’t be both. A 100% beef whopper is not 100% Impossible Whopper.

A Whopper is defined as containing 100% animal product, namely beef.

In addition, nobody calls a Whopper, a Whopper Sandwich. I’ve never heard it, except when people are writing about it.

To America and the world a Whopper is a big burger on a big bun. Nobody says they’re going to have a burger sandwich – in real time. Burger King is a little late to the table in changing what they call their Whopper into a sandwich. It’s like a hot dog. Nobody calls a hot dog in a bun, a hot dog sandwich, unless it’s made on rectangular bread.

The lawyers and Madison Avenue are trying to trick people into believing they’re eating something they’re not, by the confusing, ambiguous language they use.

There’s no wonder the confusion regarding this product. There should have been none. When I say I develop animal-free recipes with the animal meat-eater in mind, it doesn’t mean I add animal meat. Burger King made a mistake by dividing people.

Why lie? Why deceive the public in what you’re selling and what they’re buying?

According to Burger King:

The WHOPPER = “Our beef patties are made with 100% beef with no fillers, no preservatives, no additives, no nonsense. We also make our flagship product, the WHOPPER® Sandwich, with 1/4 lb* of savory flame-grilled beef.”

IMPOSSIBLE WHOPPER = “100% Whopper, 0% beef.

Our Impossible™ WHOPPER® Sandwich features a savory flame-grilled patty made from plants topped with juicy tomatoes, fresh lettuce, creamy mayonnaise, ketchup, crunchy pickles, and sliced white onions on a soft sesame seed bun. 100% WHOPPER®, 0% Beef.”

The registered mark is the same on an Impossible Whopper and a Whopper description put out by Burger King advertisers. So, if an Impossible Whopper is made with a 100% WH0PPER® which is made with 100% beef, there is a conflict. It can’t be both.

The 100% WHOPPER = 100% BEEF, not 100% plant.

So, don’t call the plant version of the Whopper a Whopper that is 100% WHOPPER®. It isn’t.

  • Clear that up before you get sued for that too.

I’m not a friend of BURGER KING. But I am a friend of ANIMAL-FREE MEATS DAIRY & FOODS.

Get an animal-free mayonnaise and cheese. Something white for the cheese, so employees don’t mix up the orange dairy cheese with the plant white cheese.

It’s already available. daiya brand and Follow Your Heart brand make the best cheeses for burger purposes. They soften quickly against the heat of the burger – daiya quicker than Follow Your Heart.

daiya is round and FYH is square. I like the round version for shape on a burger; it still wraps down over the burger nicely.

Tofutti brand Inc. is a contender, but the cellophane wraps are cumbersome and it’s not as healthy – good though; it tastes good against any burger. It also melts quicker against the heat of the food than the others – sometimes too much.

The animal-free mayonnaise that holds up the best is JUST MAYO.

Vegenaise brand, although good, has a consistency problem as you approach the bottom of the jar. JUST MAYO doesn’t; it feels thicker, which is better for restaurants.

IMPOSSIBLE WHOPPER

THE IMPOSSIBLE WHOPPER ISN’T A WHOPPER

THE IMPOSSIBLE WHOPPER UPDATE



Lawsuit claims Burger King’s Impossible Whoppers are contaminated by meat

By Jonathan Stempel and Richa Naidu,

Reuters 18 November 2019

Plant-based alternatives health-craze is here to stay

By Jonathan Stempel and Richa Naidu

(Reuters) – Burger King was sued on Monday by a vegan customer who accused the fast-food chain of contaminating its meatless “Impossible” Whoppers by cooking them on the same grills as its traditional meat burgers.

In a proposed class action, Phillip Williams said he bought an Impossible Whopper, a plant-based alternative to Burger King’s regular Whopper, at an Atlanta drive-through, and would not have paid a premium price had he known the cooking would leave it “coated in meat by-products.

“The lawsuit filed in Miami federal court seeks damages for all U.S. purchasers of the Impossible Whopper, and an injunction requiring Burger King to “plainly disclose” that Impossible Whoppers and regular burgers are cooked on the same grills.

Burger King, a unit of Toronto-based Restaurant Brands International Inc, declined to comment, saying it does not discuss pending litigation.

Its website describes the Impossible Burger as “100% Whopper, 0% Beef,” and adds that “for guests looking for a meat-free option, a non-broiler method of preparation is available upon request.

“Williams’ lawyer did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the disclaimer or the available cooking options.Impossible Foods Inc, which helped create the Impossible Whopper, has said it designed the product for meat eaters who want to consume less animal protein, not for vegans or vegetarians.

“For people who are strictly vegan, there is a microwave prep procedure that they’re welcome to ask for in any store,” Dana Worth, Impossible Foods’ head of sales, said in a recent interview.

Burger King began selling the Impossible Whopper in August.

Restaurant Brands also owns the Canadian coffee and restaurant chain Tim Hortons, and is overseen by Brazilian private equity firm 3G Capital.

The case is Williams v Burger King Corp, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida, No. 19-24755.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York and Richa Naidu in Chicago; Editing by Tom Brown)

Source: Lawsuit claims Burger King’s Impossible Whoppers are contaminated by meat