Plant-Based Food Tech Company Good Catch® Secures Over $32M In Series B Financing Round

 

Plant-Based Food Tech Company Good Catch® Secures Over $32M In Series B Financing Round

Rising global interest fuels robust investment in alternative protein products, highlighting significant shift in consumer behavior and mindset

NEWS PROVIDED BY

Good Catch 

Jan 15, 2020, 09:55 ETNEW YORK, Jan. 15, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Gathered Foods, makers of Good Catch® plant-based seafood products, today announced the closing of an oversubscribed Series B funding round, which includes two key strategic industry investors: Greenleaf Foods and 301 INC, the venture arm of General Mills.

Gathered Foods, makers of Good Catch® plant-based seafood products, today announced the closing of an oversubscribed Series B funding round, which includes two key strategic industry investors: Greenleaf Foods and 301 INC, the venture arm of General Mills.

Led by Stray Dog Capital and Rocana Ventures and including several prominent impact investors such as Almanac InvestmentsCPT Capital and New Crop Capital, the net proceeds from the investment, totaling over $32 million, will be used for significant expansion in distribution across North America, Europe and into Asia, the opening of its state-of-the-art manufacturing facility, and new product and food service channel launches in early 2020.

Valued at $4.5 billion, the U.S. plant-based foods retail market grew five times faster than the total U.S. retail food sales over the past year.

“Consumer demand of trailblazing plant-based alternatives is nearly insatiable, and this trend is led by taste and availability. This next phase for Good Catch is laser focused on meeting consumer desires with culinary applications across all channels,” said Chris Kerr, CEO and Co-Founder of Gathered Foods. “This round of investment emphasizes the food industry’s recognition of our strategy, our reception by consumers, and anticipation for more innovation to come.”

“When we met the Good Catch team, we were immediately captivated with their mission to develop more sustainable plant-based seafood products that taste as delicious as traditional seafood,” said John Haugen, Managing Director of 301 INC.

“Good Catch stands out as a strong, expandable brand with passionate leadership, and we’re excited to partner to grow.”

Behind the success of Good Catch are founding chef partners and brothers, Chad and Derek Sarno. They have worked tirelessly to help create the company’s proprietary six-legume blend (peas, chickpeas, lentils, soy, fava beans and navy beans), utilized as the base of these inaugural Good Catch products.

The added superior umami flavor from seaweed and algae extracts creates that real seafood flavor. All Good Catch products are free of dairy, GMOs, mercury, toxins, microplastics, microfibers and are safe and enjoyable for those with shellfish allergies. These products exhibit the same texture, flavor, and nutritional value as conventional seafood, without harming the environment.

“Good Catch is pioneering a new, promising sector of the fast-growing plant-based protein category and we’re thrilled to support their continued growth and progress as they deliver consumers great-tasting plant-based seafood products that support their brand mission—and ours, as well,” said Dan Curtin, President and CEO of Greenleaf Foods, SPC.

According to the United Nations, nearly 90% of the world’s marine fish stocks are now fully exploited, overexploited or depleted, with fisheries subsidies playing an integral part. Keeping startling statistics such as this in mind, Good Catch believes that the only truly sustainable seafood is one that allows fish to remain in the ocean, undisturbed.

Seafood is consumed globally and found within myriad culinary applications. From an environmental standpoint, Good Catch is hopeful that by creating delicious seafood alternatives, they’ll be able to make a real environmental impact.

“On the heels of widespread adoption of plant-based meat and increasing consumer concern about the environmental impacts of food production, the market is ripe for Good Catch’s next-generation plant-based seafood,” said Caroline Bushnell from the Good Food Institute, “Plant-based seafood provides a host of environmental benefits, including alleviating pressures on rapidly depleting fisheries, providing relief to fragile ocean ecosystems, reducing the impact of fishing nets on the ocean plastic problem, and reducing production-related GHG emissions.”

As the appetite for plant-based seafood continues to grow, the goal is to make Good Catch accessible and available for everyone. Good Catch products are now available in over 4,500 retail outlets across the United States, and will be launching in the UK in the coming weeks.

About Good Catch

Good Catch is a chef-driven revolutionary food company developing flavorful, 100% plant-based seafood alternatives. Founded by pioneering chefs Chad and Derek Sarno, Good Catch products offer the taste, texture, nutrition, and experience of seafood without harming the environment.

United by love of good food, plant-based eating, and animal welfare, Good Catch is on a mission to raise consciousness, reduce harm, and preserve environmental resources, all while delivering a great culinary experience. The team is dedicated to creating great tasting plant-based foods for everyone, from vegan to omnivore and everything in between.

Good Catch Plant Based Fish-Free Tuna is available nationwide in three versatile flavor offerings including Naked in Water, Mediterranean, and Oil & Herbs, with new products coming to market in Spring 2020.

The Good Food Institute (July 16, 2019) Plant-Based Food Retail Sales Are Growing 5x Total Food Sales. Retrieved from https://www.gfi.org/spins-data-release-2019

United Nations (July 13, 2018) 90% of fish stocks are used up – fisheries subsidies must stop. Retrieved from https://unctad.org/en/pages/newsdetails.aspx?OriginalVersionID=1812

SOURCE Good Catch

Related Links

https://goodcatchfoods.com






LOOKIN’ 4 UMAMI

A LESSON IN CREAMY

CREAM OF ASIAN PEAS 2

CREAMY ASIAN APRICOT SAUCE

Hey, I find it strange that so-called food scientists have isolated a taste sensation in soy sauce or shoyu called umami. I have yet to experience it. Maybe my buds are lacking those needed for that discernment. If not lacking, I can’t find anything, in my global-sensitive buds, resembling anything that I would interpret as a profound palatable experience upon consuming soy sauce. Swishing, gurgling, whistling, tried it all and I got nothing.

Until…I combined soy sauce with a creamy agent. The cream in the sauce screamed eureka! when the umami opened for the first time on my taste bud radar in the presence of soy sauce.

I’m wondering if it isn’t the dried fish or other animal additions to most Asian dishes that give those dishes an animal taste – but frankly wouldn’t it do the same with or without the soy sauce?

Tomato – also called a umami food, but usually found in the presence of cheese or other animal components.

Mushrooms? Same thing – always mixed with animal ingredients to enhance the animal flavor.

So for me it happened with a non-animal cream. Better now than never.

The most potent umami food on the planet barring animals – when you define umami as animal-like or enhancing the animal flavor and not simply savory (which by definition connotes an herbal necessity, which soy sauce lacks) is Kalamata olive and anything coming from it.

It is the meat. It is the lamb. It is anything you want it to be with the proper seasonings and additives.

Extra virgin olive oil is many times used by this chef as an animal alternative – no matter the dish presented. It has always been about the fat, or on a coarse piece of animal the gravy, which traditionally has been mostly fat.

If indeed soy sauce alone possesses all the necessary components to be called umami, then this cream sauce augments the umami sufficiently so that my umami-designated buds can discern it. Interestingly, soy has become one of the world’s foremost go-to foods for animal-replacement therapy.

So, in my view, umami-designated taste buds or combination of buds discern the animal taste, no matter the part of the animal. It is those buds that were meant to preserve all species from being eaten, so that when we discerned an animal on our bud-palate, we would instinctively spit it out. Over time as humans became accustomed to eating that which they were designed to reject, the body assimilated, adjusted, turned a blind eye to the existence of another being in its organism – not without its costs though.

Like the heroin addict’s body that adjusts to heroin to keep the body balanced, in the end the heroin which is supposed to be rejected – and always is initially – wins by destroying the human who indulges in it.

Cigarette smoke acts the same way. Initially our body rejects it, but we keep going back for more, till our body adjusts to it, causing symptoms of withdrawal when the cigarette smoke is blocked from entering the organism.  The same is so with alcohol. And coffee and other drugs and substances.

If you cook a mushroom just long enough, it will resemble in texture the mucous membrane, connective tissue, collagen, fat of the animal. A raw mushroom does nothing to excite that resemblance to an animal. Only when cooked does that happen.

Tomatoes. That’s a tough one. Looking for umami and the animal-like component. And maybe that’s it right there. It’s tough. Look at a whole dried tomato, open it, pull it apart, stretch it, yeah, I get the feel and the optics before it even reaches my mouth. The chew is there. Raw tomatoes don’t do that – not for me. Not yet.

Sesame? Sesame oil, not the seeds. Some seeds just texture too much like sand, but squeeze the oil out of them and it’s a whole new day.

One might think that these plant foods were predetermined to satisfy in the human and other animals the desire for eating each other. There had to be a genetically determined way to cause an animal to seek out certain foods, but also to block certain actions taken against other species vying for the same space on the planet. You can’t eat all of your enemies.

It’s all about umami and it’s all in the buds. Chew it and spit it out or chew it and swallow it.

If it can’t get past your nose it can’t get to your palate. There are lots of contradictions in nature that prove that * rule of thumb wrong: Limburger cheese, beer cheese, many cheeses, bread fruit, cooked crucifers, hard-boiled eggs, chitterlings, collard greens, caviar, sardines etc.

So why do we eat something our senses tell us to reject? Because we don’t trust our senses under all circumstances, because we see others do it, because we like breaking our own genetically determined rules for survival, because we like to tempt fate, because it feels good, even though the consequences are bad – but mostly bad long-term. It’s the short-term enjoyment, pleasure, adventure, risk-taking that exhilarates us. That’s how we read it > exhilaration, instead of fear. So there’s a trip-wire someplace that misguides us to think fun instead of fear.

* [RE: RULE OF THUMB reference. You could beat your wife with a stick no thicker than your thumb, but most people don’t make that connection any more. I didn’t. I had to look it up. I thought is was more like a measurement, thumb to eye, like the artist moving their thumb further and further away as if sizing up something – what does the artist see?


Glutamate is the most prominent neurotransmitter in the human body/brain. An excess of glutamate has been linked to numerous neurological-based diseases and disorders. Glutamate is most prominently found in animals, but also exists in plant-life.

“Excitotoxicity (Wikipedia)

In humans, it is the main excitatory neurotransmitter, being present in over 50% of nervous tissue….

…Overstimulation of glutamate receptors causes neurodegeneration and neuronal damage through a process called excitotoxicity. Excessive glutamate, or excitotoxins acting on the same glutamate receptors, overactivate glutamate receptors (specifically NMDARs), causing high levels of calcium ions (Ca2+) to influx into the postsynaptic cell.

High Ca2+ concentrations activate a cascade of cell degradation processes involving proteases, lipases, nitric oxide synthase, and a number of enzymes that damage cell structures often to the point of cell death. Ingestion of or exposure to excitotoxins that act on glutamate receptors can induce excitotoxicity and cause toxic effects on the central nervous system. This becomes a problem for cells, as it feeds into a cycle of positive feedback cell death.

Glutamate excitotoxicity triggered by overstimulation of glutamate receptors also contributes to intracellular oxidative stress. Proximal glial cells use a cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) to transport cystine into the cell and glutamate out. Excessive extracellular glutamate concentrations reverse xCT, so glial cells no longer have enough cystine to synthesize glutathione (GSH), an antioxidant. Lack of GSH leads to more reactive oxygen species (ROSs) that damage and kill the glial cell, which then cannot reuptake and process extracellular glutamate. This is another positive feedback in glutamate excitotoxicity. In addition, increased Ca2+ concentrations activate nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the over-synthesis of nitric oxide(NO). High NO concentration damages mitochondria, leading to more energy depletion, and adds oxidative stress to the neuron as NO is a ROS.“…wikipedia

…Further, glutamate occupies a central position in amino acid metabolism in plants.”


Glutatamate is an amino acid associated with proteins – animal or plant.

In fact, the existence of glutamate in animals and plants is pervasive.

Since eating plants has not been associated with neurological diseases and disorders (NDAD), it might be wise to reduce the amount of glutamate ingested by reducing significantly or totally the amount of animal products ingested.

You can still have your umami and eat it too – only through plants, would be the correct survival advantage choice to make, not through animals.








 

Cream Of Asian Peas

CREAM OF ASIAN PEAS 2

CREAM OF ASIAN PEAS

Cooked peas swimming in a umami-rich Creamy Asian Apricot Sauce! Hey, Asians eat creamy. They love creamy! This is for you!

Makes  almost 1 cup sauce and 3-1/2 cups peas

Continue reading “Cream Of Asian Peas”

LOCATE YOUR TASTE BUDS

Did you know that taste buds are located around the small structures known as papillae found on the upper surface of the tonguesoft palate, upper esophagus, the cheek and epiglottis. Betcha thought taste buds were only on the tongue. Me too.

Wine tasters known for swishing the wine around the mouth are not only aerating it, they’re experiencing the wine through all of their taste buds, much like we do with food. Some even reach the buds on their upper esophagus by gargling the wine.  So in essence you could say they’re eating the wine.

TASTE SENSATION: Salty, sweet, sour, bitter and umami. So what’s umami mean? Seems like we should know that and not have to look it up. Savory. Umami is a Japanese word. So, in English it’s savory.

People taste umami through receptors specific to glutamate. Glutamate is widely present in savory foods, such as meat broths and fermented products, and commonly added to some foods in the form of monosodium glutamate (MSG). Since umami has its own receptors rather than arising out of a combination of the traditionally recognized taste receptors, scientists now consider umami to be a distinct taste.

Somebody on a food show recently referred to umami as including all the taste sensations. So the meaning may be in the process of becoming morphed into a definition that people can better relate to or understand.

Acrid use to be considered one of the taste sensations, but it looks like it no longer is, so the exact nature of taste buds and what they detect is somewhat fluid. Acrid is like the taste of olives – pungent. To me acrid/pungent is different from salty, sweet, sour, bitter, savory.

For more info on taste buds.

For more info on umami.